Greetings from Western Canada

Mr. Cross
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Greetings from Western Canada

Post by Mr. Cross » Mon Jan 21, 2019 11:12 pm

Hello,

My name is Elijah. I am 30 years old.

I played electric and acoustic guitar in my teens and early twenties; but have not played anything in a good 5+ years.

I recently discovered Renaissance and Baroque music, and have been listening to a lot of lute works from those periods in particular. This has rekindled my desire to play the guitar, but this time learning how to read music, and not just tablature. I have yet to listen to much classical guitar from the classical period.

I have a young family, so free time is very rare. Hopefully I can slowly work my way through a method book for now—I’m thinking of using that of Frederick Noad.

If I do pursue the classical guitar at this stage, I will have a tonne of questions.

I’m thankful to have found this forum.
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GeoffB
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Re: Greetings from Western Canada

Post by GeoffB » Tue Jan 22, 2019 4:10 pm

Hello Elijah,

Welcome to the forum! I'm sure you'll find plenty to interest you here. Please have a look at this page for some useful information to get you started, including links to the rules and helpfiles. After your second message has been approved, you will have access to all members' scores and recordings plus the first 3 levels of the Delcamp score collections. After you have posted 20 messages, you can apply for the 020 group, which will give you access to the remaining levels. Just ask if you have any questions. I look forward to seeing you around!

Best wishes,
Geoff
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Mr. Cross
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Re: Greetings from Western Canada

Post by Mr. Cross » Tue Jan 22, 2019 11:43 pm

Geoff,

Thank you very much.

The more I look into it, the harder classical guitar looks; I really don’t want to bite off more than I can chew.
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GeoffB
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Re: Greetings from Western Canada

Post by GeoffB » Wed Jan 23, 2019 11:21 am

There's certainly a lot to learn to reach a high standard (the figure of 10,000 hours of study is occasionally quoted), though even very simple tunes played on a classical guitar can be pretty satisfying, if you can spare a little time to practise daily. The pleasure is in the journey as much as the destination. We do have quite a few members, though, who started when younger, had a long gap when family and career took over their lives, and then returned to the guitar in their 50s or later when time was less of an issue, and never looked back.
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Mr. Cross
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Re: Greetings from Western Canada

Post by Mr. Cross » Wed Jan 23, 2019 4:21 pm

Can much progress be made with only 15 minutes a day? Or is it necessary to practice for longer in order to fit in everything that needs practicing?
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Steve Ganz
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Re: Greetings from Western Canada

Post by Steve Ganz » Wed Jan 23, 2019 5:47 pm

Mr Cross,
A quality 15 minutes per day will lead to progress. Quantifying or evaluating the progress is up to you.
But how will you learn to use those 15 minutes?
If you live in Vancouver, there are many teachers that can help to direct your efforts.
Steve

Mr. Cross
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Re: Greetings from Western Canada

Post by Mr. Cross » Wed Jan 23, 2019 5:55 pm

I live in Kelowna.

I have two young toddlers and a pregnant wife, so I won’t be looking for lessons at this time. At best I’ll be teaching myself; but even that is questionable. I don’t want to have a false start.
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dta721
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Re: Greetings from Western Canada

Post by dta721 » Wed Jan 23, 2019 6:55 pm

Mr. Cross wrote:
Wed Jan 23, 2019 5:55 pm
I live in Kelowna.

I have two young toddlers and a pregnant wife, so I won’t be looking for lessons at this time. At best I’ll be teaching myself; but even that is questionable. I don’t want to have a false start.
Other than F. Noad book, Aaron Shearer Vol I & II is another "text book" for you.

I think if you can spend 15 min daily on this book, soon enough you'd be motivated to even budget more time to learn at your own pace. Then, there can be no look back :)

Enjoy your journey!

Mr. Cross
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Re: Greetings from Western Canada

Post by Mr. Cross » Thu Jan 24, 2019 2:42 am

Thank you, gentlemen.

I’m still researching method books before I dive in.
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Mollbarre
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Re: Greetings from Western Canada

Post by Mollbarre » Thu Jan 24, 2019 1:48 pm

Even if there's no time/money for weekly lessons I'd suggest finding someone to give you occasional lessons.

I had one guitar lesson - 2 years ago - to make sure I wasn't doing anything inherently wrong from the get go. That was pretty much the first time I had even held a guitar.

Then - I let it all slide, until last month when I got a new guitar. I've messed about with it on my own (with books!) but now I have more questions that need to be addressed by a professional - so I will book another lesson. I don't want to go too far off track.

In short: You just cant "see" what you're doing wrong on your own. And since we all tend to practice what we find easy (even if it's wrong) and neglect what we find hard, when we don't get guidance we can rapidly just learn to get really good at doing it all wrong. And relearning to do it correctly is very difficult.

I play other instruments - and I've started teaching beginners (NOT guitar :wink: ) - so I'm coming at this from a number of angles...
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Rick Beauregard
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Re: Greetings from Western Canada

Post by Rick Beauregard » Thu Jan 24, 2019 4:48 pm

Lessons may be a challenge with your family situation. If you haven’t found them already, look at the free lessons here on Delcamp. Whatever time you can squeeze out of your day will be rewarding to you I am sure. Once you’ve worked at it for a while, seek out some nice beginner lullaby’s and your kids will love it too and you’ll be touching their lives in a way that can’t be duplicated. You might ask this forum for recommendations.
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Jason Kulas
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Re: Greetings from Western Canada

Post by Jason Kulas » Fri Jan 25, 2019 3:57 pm

I'm self-teaching from Noad. One of the most popular self-teaching books. Very quickly, even with short practice sessions, you will be playing simple practice pieces that will sound beautiful to you. Which will be rewarding and motivating.

If you're good at paying attention to pictures and videos, you can check your posture/position/technique/etc.

I would recommend one additional book to start, Stanley Yates' book "Modern Classical Guitar Method". He will cover modern thinking in ergonomics of how you should be holding/playing/fingering the guitar. And it links to online video.

There's also a free course of instruction on this site, with videos, and student evaluation/feedback.
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Jason Kulas
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Re: Greetings from Western Canada

Post by Jason Kulas » Fri Jan 25, 2019 6:56 pm

Regarding the free course here...you can get feedback on your progress from other players...and if you take all the courses, it's the equivalent of 6 years of music school. If you take the optional final exams, apparently it has official status in France, and would count towards your entrance requirements if you were to apply to study music there. The forum for the classes is: viewforum.php?f=41 . The post about registering is: viewtopic.php?f=41&t=54023 . And the FAQ about the course is: viewtopic.php?f=41&t=62687
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