Hello from Los Angeles/Sherman Oaks, the Valley!

macnylonguitar
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Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2019 2:51 am

Hello from Los Angeles/Sherman Oaks, the Valley!

Post by macnylonguitar » Tue Feb 05, 2019 4:18 am

Greetings, John K here...

I have been playing 46 years, haver a Bachelor's of Music degree in jazz and classical guitar from Western Connecticut State University, 1987

Professionally, I have been an Apple systems engineer for many many years, having worked at Apple HQ in 2001-2003, iTunes 1.0... Trust me all things guitar, and especially nylon guitar are by a wide margin, far more fun and interesting.

It wasn't until after 5 plus years after I graduated in 1987 that I was introduced to the likes of "fingerstyle" guitar: steel string payers initially, then nlyon: Preston Reed, Chris Proctor, Pierre Bensusan, and solo Earl Klugh.

I took a class with John Knowles (Chet Atkins good friend) and asked him about right hand tone and technique, and he said Chet told him (and others) "find a teacher that will teach you that, without necessarily having to swear an allegiance to any musical genre". I ventured out, and found Ben Verdery at Yale in New Haven, CT, and took no more than two lessons...got my nails and tone majorly improved, and on my way.

Since I started guitar when I was 8, I was always drawn to the nylon guitar, and the first piece I Iearned (by ear, no transcription) was "Mood For a Day" by Steve Howe (Yes). Thumb and index only...(make it harder on myself). Later I got much more efficient right hand fingerings..

Even after being influenced by countless guitarists of so many genres: some of which were: Al Di Meola, Wes Montgomery, Allan Holdsworth, etc., I heard Earl Klugh's Solo Guitar album, and was stunned and mezmorized.. no overdubs..

What I found out later is even though Earl has some stellar arrangements, he is not limited to arrangements... he can and will truly "improvise" chordal / fingerstyle pieces, like a Bill Evans on piano..(His knowledge of the fret board harmony, and diving into voicings, George Van Epps, etc, helped him to get that mastery.

To this day, Earl is one of my favorites in his approach, right hand technique, tone, harmony / substitutions. I never realized the guitar could do this, or a nylon guitar could sound this full and beautiful on "jazz" tunes.

I also play electric: jazz and fusion, and am having a headless guitar built for me by luthier Rich Chaffins in West Virginia, sort of Strandberg influenced, the idea of being a jazz guitar (chambered walnut), doing Ed Bickert, Ted Greene, Pat Martino type stuff, but also some fusion: a la Holdsworth, Darryl Gabel,etc..

I myself have been diving into fretboard harmony and studying it, I'd say systematically for the last 7-10 years, and I have some made some great breakthroughs, to sort of simplify / organize it.

Instead of just memorizing frets / fingers, and maybe having no idea of the chord(s) one is playing, say in one voicing, that same chord shape can / and will have 5 different names / functions. I am in the process of putting together some YouTube videos on this..and then consequential material / lessons to get a unifying understanding of fretboard harmony..

I also have had the luthier nylon guitar bug for over 25 years now. Have had several hi end luthier nylons and steels: Kenny Hill, Jose Oribe, Larrivee, 1999 Taylor 912c (Chris Proctor).

The last year or so I have been actively hunting for that next guitar. For me that means a lot of listening and most importantly, playing.

But getting access to, and playing hi end guitars of this nature and caliper, as many of you here know, is not necessarily easy..

On the web, I have been listening to some guitars that spoke to me: Manuel Adalid, Douglass Pringle, Tim McCoy..but one has to actually play the guitar, no substitute.

I just went to GSI here in Santa Monica and lined up about 7 guitars, $5K-$6k range, now that I have realized after these many years, that's what the price range is for that caliper level of guitar.

I played a guitar that shocked me: not just the huge volume / resonance, but the ease of the left hand in fingering, the action was shockingly low for a nylon / "classical", and can go way lower (and with normal tension strings), the neck was shallow depth, am thinking 21 mm or so (with carbon fiber strips)...to get huge volume required not really a ton of right hand power:

A 2018 cedar Sakurai / Kohno, Professional J.

This guitar blew me away, how easy it is to play. The upper trebles are solid (stiff) in left hand feel and the tone / volume, never heard this in another nylon I have ever played before.

The fretboard stunned me.. what feels like a radius, perhaps 20", perhaps stainless steel shinny frets. I thought I was playing just a wider version (52 mm) of say a Kiesel HH2 fretboard. I could do all my left hand legato runs, and that is just not possible with high action.

The basses are huge, and also shocking, the middle strings, 4,3,2, were cutting / popping out. Cut right thru. On prior nylons, those strings /notes, especially in the 5th fret and up areas, are practically dead sounding and muffled.

I believe there is a Kohno / Sakurai Fan Club here (thread?), please I want to sign up. My next nylon guitar, for sure, will be this guitar. My search is over... Cedar or spruce? Always been a spruce fan, but cedar was great on this guitar...

When I took that class with John Knowles in the early 1990's in Connecticut, what was John playing, a Kohno, makes too much sense to me now. Look forward to this site and thanks so much... john
Last edited by macnylonguitar on Tue Feb 05, 2019 8:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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George Crocket
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Re: Hello from Los Angeles/Sherman Oaks, the Valley!

Post by George Crocket » Tue Feb 05, 2019 7:15 am

Hello John. Welcome to the Delcamp classical guitar forum. Thanks for the extensive introduction.

If you have not already done so, please have a look at our welcome page for more information about the forum and its rules.

Once you have posted a second message you will be able to access all the mp3 files and videos in our recording sections, all the members' scores and levels 1 - 3 of the Delcamp score collection, and post your own scores and recordings. After 20 posts you may subscribe to the 020 usergroup with associated membership privileges including access to the higher levels of sheet music in Delcamp's library (see here).

It is helpful if members include their location in their Profile - click on your username and edit.

You will find the Kohno and Sakurai fan club thread here.

Enjoy your visits.
George
2010 Stephen Eden spruce/cocobolo classical guitar
2012 Stephen Eden cedar/IRW classical guitar

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Jason Kulas
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Re: Hello from Los Angeles/Sherman Oaks, the Valley!

Post by Jason Kulas » Tue Feb 05, 2019 3:13 pm

Welcome!
macnylonguitar wrote:
Tue Feb 05, 2019 4:18 am
found Ben Verdery at Yale in New Haven, CT, and took no more than two lessons...got my nails and tone majorly improved, and on my way.
Hah, I'm near Yale, maybe I should do that! How long had you been playing Classical before you went to Ben?
Yamaha G-50A. Connecticut, USA

macnylonguitar
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Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2019 2:51 am

Re: Hello from Los Angeles/Sherman Oaks, the Valley!

Post by macnylonguitar » Tue Feb 05, 2019 8:09 pm

Jason, what's up... I had been playing nylon fingerstyle (classical) for many years..since I was 14, so 11 years, and but only 4 years in college, but really did not have a proper right hand technique...Really the the teacher should be teaching "tone", volume, and accuracy, and efficiency, ease...and the student will naturally adjust to get that...


With me I found a lot of it was the nails.. I didn't know about Scott Tenant's Pumping Nylon nails section, book was probably not out at that time, and no YouTube yet..

When one is clear on the final objective, for guitar, etc, actually anything in life, the answers can come quick, and from anywhere /everywhere..and they are usually suited exactly to our need at that time... Interestingly I may hit up Scott T here in Pasadena CA, not far from me, and run some right hand stuff by him...He is great at this stuff as is Matt Palmer... I have this weird "high arch angle" in my right wrist, and my hand can get tired from playing, it's the specific angle I am used to, and when I flatten my right the nail angle changes, and it feels so weird...thx, john

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Jason Kulas
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Location: Connecticut, USA

Re: Hello from Los Angeles/Sherman Oaks, the Valley!

Post by Jason Kulas » Tue Feb 05, 2019 9:51 pm

Yeah, I've watched a lot of videos about nails (including Tennant's), read some articles, etc. It's so individual. How long your fingers are, their relative lengths, the way they meet the strings, the fleshiness/shape/taper of your fingertips, the shape/quality of your natural nail, etc. I'm trying to get the best nails sustainable in my physically-active lifestyle. A "wrong" nail setup forces you to change your fingering technique to adjust for what your nail enables (or doesn't enable).
Last edited by Jason Kulas on Tue Feb 12, 2019 2:20 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Yamaha G-50A. Connecticut, USA

macnylonguitar
Posts: 5
Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2019 2:51 am

Re: Hello from Los Angeles/Sherman Oaks, the Valley!

Post by macnylonguitar » Wed Feb 06, 2019 1:50 am

Agreed, totally individual...the whole experience is... even one guitar sounding one way on one player and different on another. Experimentation, Discovery, Intuition...For me anyway, I now know rather quickly, whether it be tone, composing, lines, you name it...if it's right for me or not.. thx, john k

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