Matt Palmer's Fast Scale Book and approach

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guitarrista
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Re: Matt Palmer's Fast Scale Book and approach

Post by guitarrista » Wed Jan 23, 2019 9:42 pm

Terpfan wrote:
Tue Jan 22, 2019 11:13 pm
Adrian Allan wrote:
Tue Jan 22, 2019 9:45 pm
(as I believe that a fast clean scale is the true test of guitar technique - let's face it, even masters like Bream and Yepes found fast scales hit and miss on a bad day).
It seems the key to fast clean scales is breaking down longer scales to smaller pieces and sequencing it together.
That's only one aspect of it. There are several more - left-hand-right-hand synchronicity, string-changing, minimizing tension. All of these have to be worked out in order to play long scales fast.
Konstantin
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1982 Anselmo Solar Gonzalez

Terpfan
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Re: Matt Palmer's Fast Scale Book and approach

Post by Terpfan » Thu Jan 24, 2019 1:31 am

For me, in the longer scale runs, the timing start to deteriorate at the end. Not sounding crisp. By braking down scales, every new section feels like starting over a scale, making it more crisp. So Villa Lobos etude 7 opening, I'll practice first 3 strings and next 3 strings so even if first section is not perfect, second section has new life in it. I'll post a video later. Hard to explain. (I am talking about fast scales)

msa3psu
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Re: Matt Palmer's Fast Scale Book and approach

Post by msa3psu » Thu Jan 24, 2019 3:02 pm

breaking it down into parts also helps you know where you are and where you're going. I have students who think that fast playing, especially scales is meant to be almost involuntary because there's no time to think about it and that you have to practice until they are completely instinctive. This is partly true but it is also necessary to think while playing fast. I always have a few waypoints worked out and try to mentally be aware of hitting them on the way through the scale.

Terpfan
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Re: Matt Palmer's Fast Scale Book and approach

Post by Terpfan » Thu Jan 24, 2019 7:21 pm

msa3psu wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 3:02 pm
breaking it down into parts also helps you know where you are and where you're going. I have students who think that fast playing, especially scales is meant to be almost involuntary because there's no time to think about it and that you have to practice until they are completely instinctive. This is partly true but it is also necessary to think while playing fast. I always have a few waypoints worked out and try to mentally be aware of hitting them on the way through the scale.
Yes, in longer scales run like Chaccone, many use slurs between scales as a waypoint.

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guitarrista
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Re: Matt Palmer's Fast Scale Book and approach

Post by guitarrista » Thu Jan 24, 2019 8:04 pm

msa3psu wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 3:02 pm
I have students who think that fast playing, especially scales is meant to be almost involuntary because there's no time to think about it
As you suggest, this is likely not the right approach. Being able to play a long scale fast actually means being able to grasp every note with your mind without losing track, and means being aware of, say, the beginning note of every group of notes per string (your 'anchors' in the scale run); it is as if time slows down, so it does not actually sound that fast to you. Same thing with tremolo, IMO.
Konstantin
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1982 Anselmo Solar Gonzalez

Terpfan
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Re: Matt Palmer's Fast Scale Book and approach

Post by Terpfan » Thu Jan 24, 2019 11:22 pm

guitarrista wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 8:04 pm
msa3psu wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 3:02 pm
I have students who think that fast playing, especially scales is meant to be almost involuntary because there's no time to think about it
As you suggest, this is likely not the right approach. Being able to play a long scale fast actually means being able to grasp every note with your mind without losing track, and means being aware of, say, the beginning note of every group of notes per string (your 'anchors' in the scale run); it is as if time slows down, so it does not actually sound that fast to you. Same thing with tremolo, IMO.
I dont think you can grasp every notes in your mind especially playing fast. I think maybe at quarter note at 108 I can visualize every note... finger are different story.. it can go a lot faster with muscle memory.

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guitarrista
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Re: Matt Palmer's Fast Scale Book and approach

Post by guitarrista » Fri Jan 25, 2019 12:07 am

Terpfan wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 11:22 pm
guitarrista wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 8:04 pm
msa3psu wrote:
Thu Jan 24, 2019 3:02 pm
I have students who think that fast playing, especially scales is meant to be almost involuntary because there's no time to think about it
As you suggest, this is likely not the right approach. Being able to play a long scale fast actually means being able to grasp every note with your mind without losing track, and means being aware of, say, the beginning note of every group of notes per string (your 'anchors' in the scale run); it is as if time slows down, so it does not actually sound that fast to you. Same thing with tremolo, IMO.
I dont think you can grasp every notes in your mind especially playing fast. I think maybe at quarter note at 108 I can visualize every note... finger are different story.. it can go a lot faster with muscle memory.
I don't mean being individually conscious of every note; just not losing track, and hearing (not necessarily consciously identifying and processing) every note instead of just a blur.
Konstantin
--
1982 Anselmo Solar Gonzalez

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