Do you change the angle of your hand or fingers using freestrokes when doing fast arpeggios?

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twistedblues
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Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2017 7:48 pm

Do you change the angle of your hand or fingers using freestrokes when doing fast arpeggios?

Post by twistedblues » Tue Dec 19, 2017 7:00 am

Do you change the angle of your hand or fingers using freestrokes when doing fast arpeggios?

How do you know you are doing a freestroke correctly and not the bicycle without a teacher?

ben etow
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Joined: Tue May 31, 2011 4:23 pm
Location: Brussels

Re: Do you change the angle of your hand or fingers using freestrokes when doing fast arpeggios?

Post by ben etow » Wed Dec 20, 2017 6:40 pm

I do not change the angle of the finger or hand when playing reststrokes and freestrokes, but I move the arm slightly upwards for reststrokes as I play freestrokes with the left part of the fingertips and reststrokes with the right part of the fingertips (except for the thumb).

Nick Cutroneo
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Location: Manchester, CT

Re: Do you change the angle of your hand or fingers using freestrokes when doing fast arpeggios?

Post by Nick Cutroneo » Wed Jan 24, 2018 6:01 am

twistedblues wrote:
Tue Dec 19, 2017 7:00 am
Do you change the angle of your hand or fingers using freestrokes when doing fast arpeggios?
What I change is the placement of my forearm. This does change the "angle" of the hand to a certain extent. The concept of having a RH position optimized for rest stroke and a RH position optimized for free stroke isn't new. If you check out this most recent video I did on instagram, you'll see what I'm talking about with free stroke vs rest stroke. This is also exaggerated due to me going from playing the lower strings to the higher strings, but it's the same concept.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BeULFxZnPT8/
How do you know you are doing a freestroke correctly and not the bicycle without a teacher?
Your teacher should have spoken to you about how the fingers move into the hand and what you should be looking for. I tell my students to practice in front of the mirror. We spend a lot of time in lessons (especially in the beginning or refining technique) working towards playing correctly with me re-inforcing proper movements vs. improper movements. I do this with a mirror in front of them so they can "see" what I see. It takes a while, but ultimately the student will be able to differentiate between proper and improper movements. At that point it's a matter of reinforcing.

A good place to start about bicycling fingers is to play from the large knuckle joint (base knuckle). Make sure the mid joint is actually moving (in space - NOT flexing). An easy way to determine this is to place your left hand fingers on your mid joints of the RH, then pluck. If you are pushing against the left hand fingers, you aren't playing from the base knuckle.
Nick Cutroneo - Classical Guitarist, performer/teacher/suzuki instructor

Todd Tipton
Teacher
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Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2008 3:21 pm
Location: Cincinnati, OH, USA

Re: Do you change the angle of your hand or fingers using freestrokes when doing fast arpeggios?

Post by Todd Tipton » Wed Jan 24, 2018 7:53 pm

As Nick already said, you don't change the angle. I talk a bit about what I do in my studio; every student is unique. Sometimes, we really need to learn deliberate, slow, and contrived motions in order to begin building the habits of the fingers moving how we want them to move in default playing. With careful guidance, this is sometimes achieved starting from the end. What I mean is, necessity can be the mother of invention. Sometimes starting with the fast movement can be a great teacher (with guidance). The only way to achieve those rapid movements with freedom of excess tension is to move most efficiently. Many times, students can find those movements unconsciously. And then, that experience can help show a student how the fingers should move in default playing. It can also help in shaping the nails so that you get the best tone without altering the hand. While every student is different, I would say that most of my students get a good mix of both approaches. Similar to what I said in an earlier post this morning, neither approach is right or wrong. Rather, they are both attempts to correct something and to lead students into good default movements.
Dr. Todd Tipton, classical guitarist
Cincinnati, OH, USA (available via Skype)

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