Getting same sound with every finger

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ski

Re: Getting same sound with every finger

Post by ski » Fri Mar 19, 2010 5:56 am

many guitar players have struggled in this problem before..

sometimes you want to play the sound in SAME QUAILTY in every finger, sometimes you want to make a DIFFERENCE

but everyone is physically different, this kind of unity may not be achieved perfectly in some people, including me..

personally, i use i,a for fast passage/runs becoz they sound quite equal, which may not be well accpeted by other members in this forum, but i know this is due to the unique physics of my fingers and i just need to perform in my own way. This turns out to be quite rewarding, my strength of ring finger improved a lot since i paid much attention to it with 'i' finger.

pain + passion + patience = gain in CG

Cincy2
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Re: Getting same sound with every finger

Post by Cincy2 » Fri Mar 19, 2010 11:17 am

KenK wrote: Check the back of your hand when you play.
It should for the most part be parallel to the soundboard.
(Unless you play South American style)
This was my problem. Easily identified but a little harder to make a habit.

Cincy
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KenK

Re: Getting same sound with every finger

Post by KenK » Fri Mar 19, 2010 2:02 pm

Cincy2 wrote:
KenK wrote: Check the back of your hand when you play.
It should for the most part be parallel to the soundboard.
(Unless you play South American style)
This was my problem. Easily identified but a little harder to make a habit.

Cincy
Hi Cincy-

Yes it is hard to make a fundamental position change.
When I did it, constant use of a mirror was the key.

KenK

ThePredster

Re: Getting same sound with every finger

Post by ThePredster » Fri Mar 19, 2010 7:36 pm

I must ask. How do you play tremolo without your finger falling on the adjacent string? I have a somewhat more equal sound but in practicing I find myself muting the adjacent string.....

ThePredster

Re: Getting same sound with every finger

Post by ThePredster » Sat Mar 20, 2010 3:46 pm

After reading from this site classicalguitarlatinstyle.com
It says on your left hand, your knuckes should be moving your hand and not your joints. I've always used the joints and I'm probabaly going to change that. Now does this apply to the right hand? Should I be using the joints like I've always been or knuckle movement.
Thankyou :merci:

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Re: Getting same sound with every finger

Post by LVR » Sat Mar 20, 2010 7:39 pm

You should primarily be using the joint between the hand and the finger: MP joint in medical terminology. I think you are referring to this as the knuckle, which is fine as long as we're all talking about the same thing. This is where the driving force should be. You may have to flex the joints between the finger bones a bit as well, especially on the follow-through, but no clawing motions please.
The basic thing about playing the guitar is the pleasure you get from it. There's nothing wrong with pleasure is there?
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Adam S. Vernon

Re: Getting same sound with every finger

Post by Adam S. Vernon » Sun Mar 21, 2010 3:41 am

For what it's worth, my index finger was the one with the weak tone compared to the rest. The issue was nail shape. I found the right shape, and my index sounds great now. Just keep pluggin' away at it and you'll work it out.

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Re: Getting same sound with every finger

Post by glassynails » Sun Mar 21, 2010 2:17 pm

The A nail has to be longer than all the rest to get a nice tone (at least for me). My nails are progressively longer from I to A. Index requires nail a little longer than the tip, middle maybe around 1mm to 1.5, and A I have at about 2 to 2.5 mm.

:)
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JohnRoss

Re: Getting same sound with every finger

Post by JohnRoss » Sun Mar 21, 2010 4:02 pm

ThePredster wrote:I cant get the same tone from every finger... What makes it sound so different?
Bear in mind that the action of sounding a string is - or should be - more complicated than just a simple striking action. The finger moves the string into tension, away from its resting position (tirando, upwards, apoyando, downwards) and releases it (imagine that your finger were infinitely strong - if there were no release movement, it would just keep pulling until the string broke). So your finger needs to "stroke" the string, pull and release. As this is generally too complex to actually think about as you are doing it, it is better to rely on your ears than on your fingers. You are probably trying to get this "same tone" by doing the same movements, which is very difficult because each finger has a different position, angle, distance and so on in relation to the string. So instead of trying to get an even tone using your fingers, I suggest you use your ears.

For example, this little routine helped me get over a slightly different technical obstacle (you can even do it without apoyando if you start at the third point):

- With one finger, let's say i, play a note apoyando or rest stroke, making your finger "land" on the string below (don't play loud, don't play fast, these are other qualities you get with other uses of your muscles).
- Repeat the note but more apoyando, i.e., depressing the string further into the guitar. Then even more, be excessive. Then less.
- Now a little bit tirando or free stroke, pulling the string up rather than pushing it down and not having it rest on the next string but move a bit above it. Now more tirando, further upwards, then tirando practically perpendicular to the sound board, again, be excessive, try and make the string snap against the neck.
- Go through the above sequence backwards. You will then have played through most of the tone register available to you with that particular finger, including extreme tones you would not want to use in your playing.
- Do the same with your other RH fingers.
- Play repeated notes with alternating RH fingers, either apoyando or tirando but in either case moderately, depressing the string a little or pulling it up a little. But now, don't think about your finger movements - instead, listen, and try to get the same sound with each finger.

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lagartija
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Re: Getting same sound with every finger

Post by lagartija » Sun Mar 21, 2010 6:02 pm

That's interesting, John...... For both apoyando and tirando I push the string down towards the soundboard. Never pulling up. The only difference is that the follow through takes me past the next string in tirando and in apoyando it stops on the next string....
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JohnRoss

Re: Getting same sound with every finger

Post by JohnRoss » Sun Mar 21, 2010 7:01 pm

lagartija wrote:That's interesting, John...... For both apoyando and tirando I push the string down towards the soundboard. Never pulling up. The only difference is that the follow through takes me past the next string in tirando and in apoyando it stops on the next string....
Fair enough, I expect you're right and I'm wrong. The idea, though, was precisely not to dwell too much on what the fingers are doing, but to vary between apoyando and tirando and become aware that you can produce a greater depth of apoyando or tirando tone at will, and so help eliminate the problem of getting different tones with different fingers. I use my 'c' a lot, though I stopped doing so for a long time because I was getting bogged down with exactly what the finger motion should be, which side of the nail to ramp, and so on. Going back to using my 'c' again made me realise that all of that is far less important than knowing what you want to hear.

To put it another way, think of the difference between an artist and the rest of us. We tend to think it's the years of training and so on, powers of observation,an innate talent or whatever, and of course they are important. But if the artist has a pencil and I have a pencil and we have to draw a portrait of someone, the difference will not be determined so much by our knowing what the person looks like, we both know that, or even by our relative competence in using the pencil. The real difference is that the artist knows what the portrait should look like before he starts drawing, and I don't.

Nikos_Greek
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Re: Getting same sound with every finger

Post by Nikos_Greek » Wed Jan 24, 2018 7:00 am

In summary some of the exercises that have helped me to achieve to a good extent homogeneity of tone in all ima fingers:
G iulianni 120 studies, rasgueados, scales in all possible rh finger combinations (tirando and apoyando). It takes time but eventually you improve the tone you produce along with a better control over rh finger movement.

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prawnheed
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Re: Getting same sound with every finger

Post by prawnheed » Wed Jan 24, 2018 11:21 am

JohnRoss wrote:
Sun Mar 21, 2010 4:02 pm
ThePredster wrote:I cant get the same tone from every finger... What makes it sound so different?
Bear in mind that the action of sounding a string is - or should be - more complicated than just a simple striking action. The finger moves the string into tension, away from its resting position (tirando, upwards, apoyando, downwards) and releases it (imagine that your finger were infinitely strong - if there were no release movement, it would just keep pulling until the string broke). So your finger needs to "stroke" the string, pull and release. As this is generally too complex to actually think about as you are doing it, it is better to rely on your ears than on your fingers. You are probably trying to get this "same tone" by doing the same movements, which is very difficult because each finger has a different position, angle, distance and so on in relation to the string. So instead of trying to get an even tone using your fingers, I suggest you use your ears.

For example, this little routine helped me get over a slightly different technical obstacle (you can even do it without apoyando if you start at the third point):

- With one finger, let's say i, play a note apoyando or rest stroke, making your finger "land" on the string below (don't play loud, don't play fast, these are other qualities you get with other uses of your muscles).
- Repeat the note but more apoyando, i.e., depressing the string further into the guitar. Then even more, be excessive. Then less.
- Now a little bit tirando or free stroke, pulling the string up rather than pushing it down and not having it rest on the next string but move a bit above it. Now more tirando, further upwards, then tirando practically perpendicular to the sound board, again, be excessive, try and make the string snap against the neck.
- Go through the above sequence backwards. You will then have played through most of the tone register available to you with that particular finger, including extreme tones you would not want to use in your playing.
- Do the same with your other RH fingers.
- Play repeated notes with alternating RH fingers, either apoyando or tirando but in either case moderately, depressing the string a little or pulling it up a little. But now, don't think about your finger movements - instead, listen, and try to get the same sound with each finger.
This is good advice.

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