Do you wonder ever if it's all worth it?

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RaajShinde
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Joined: Sun Dec 03, 2017 5:59 pm
Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan

Re: Do you wonder ever if it's all worth it?

Post by RaajShinde » Mon Feb 12, 2018 3:35 pm

Is it worth it?

For me, it is. I just started my CG journey a scant month+ ago, at the age of 54, so a bit of late-ish start. I have always had a desire to play guitar and love how much beautiful music there is to play in the CGF world. I am also interested in other forms of music - jazz/rock, prog metal etc. and hope to be able to utilize some of the skills I develop learning CG in these other worlds too.

So why is it worth it for me personally? I work more than full-time for a living and it's not like I have much time on my hands. Making the time every day to learn and play is hard and requires a ton of discipline. There are days when I attempt/struggle to read and play a simple piece from the RCM Beginning Repertoire book and then I see someone like Per-Olov Kindgren play Ave Maria on Youtube. It can be a demoralizing experience and I have often asked myself if trying to learn CG at this age is just plain silly on my part. What keeps me going is the sheer challenge of learning to read music, learning theory and the physical skills in both hands. My hope is that all this effort is knitting a huge number of new neural connections and synaptic pathways, enhancing what is already there, and hopefully bringing the benefits to all other areas of my life, in addition to the satisfaction of actually playing music. After five decades of muddling through life, I think I've begun to learn the meaning and implications of the idea that it is the journey that matters, not necessarily the destination. I think there is joy in undertaking a non-trivial journey and then making progress on that path, howsoever small that progress may be. CG is definitely that journey for me.

Finally, I am glad that I don't have to do this for a living! With my level of talent, I am pretty sure my family would starve! It is wonderful that we live in world where we can pursue hobbies like CG. :)

Cheers!
The Sage is occupied with the unspoken
and acts without effort.
Teaching without verbosity,
producing without possessing,
creating without regard to result,
claiming nothing,
the Sage has nothing to lose.

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David Gutowski
Posts: 621
Joined: Fri Apr 22, 2016 4:14 am
Location: Southwest USA

Re: Do you wonder ever if it's all worth it?

Post by David Gutowski » Wed Feb 14, 2018 5:28 am

Pick up a copy of music book titled: Hanon for Guitar, Alfred Pub. (Amazon) and play in the lower, middle and upper position at first (natural notes-no sharps, flats). Cost around 10.00 and is a great book to learn all the notes and note position up the fret board. Then play all sharps/flats up the neck. Verbalize the notes as much as possible as you play. You will find if you can identify where all the notes are and where they are on the staff paper (music paper) playing is a lot easier and you will make faster progress. Each time you play through the book make a pencil note for a count. Set your goal for twenty times-takes a while but after about 20 times playing it should come natural. Did you know the stats on how many guitar players actually know and can identify each note on the fret board? Only about 20% of players...and ironically enough it's endemic to the guitar only. On most all other instruments, players can id the notes except for cg. And that's the truth, I didn't make it up. (how's my spelling?)
3 hard things for humans: dentist visit, public speaking, offering forgiveness.

Muse: chg pitch measure rhym feel tempo improvise melody harmonize arpeggios stucco your legato & practice

Carrillo Concert
Yulong Chamber '17
Bozo 123

RaajShinde
Posts: 112
Joined: Sun Dec 03, 2017 5:59 pm
Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan

Re: Do you wonder ever if it's all worth it?

Post by RaajShinde » Tue Feb 20, 2018 4:03 pm

David Gutowski wrote:
Wed Feb 14, 2018 5:28 am
Pick up a copy of music book titled: Hanon for Guitar, Alfred Pub. (Amazon) and play in the lower, middle and upper position at first (natural notes-no sharps, flats). Cost around 10.00 and is a great book to learn all the notes and note position up the fret board. Then play all sharps/flats up the neck. Verbalize the notes as much as possible as you play. You will find if you can identify where all the notes are and where they are on the staff paper (music paper) playing is a lot easier and you will make faster progress. Each time you play through the book make a pencil note for a count. Set your goal for twenty times-takes a while but after about 20 times playing it should come natural. Did you know the stats on how many guitar players actually know and can identify each note on the fret board? Only about 20% of players...and ironically enough it's endemic to the guitar only. On most all other instruments, players can id the notes except for cg. And that's the truth, I didn't make it up. (how's my spelling?)
Thanks, David. Appreciate the pointers. I will grab the Hanon book. I got Bruce Arnold's Single String Studies for Classical Guitar and have begun working on those to learn to read and identify the notes on the fretboard. I hope to get here eventually... :)

Cheers!
The Sage is occupied with the unspoken
and acts without effort.
Teaching without verbosity,
producing without possessing,
creating without regard to result,
claiming nothing,
the Sage has nothing to lose.

User avatar
David Gutowski
Posts: 621
Joined: Fri Apr 22, 2016 4:14 am
Location: Southwest USA

Re: Do you wonder ever if it's all worth it?

Post by David Gutowski » Wed Feb 21, 2018 4:49 am

RaajShinde wrote:
Tue Feb 20, 2018 4:03 pm
David Gutowski wrote:
Wed Feb 14, 2018 5:28 am
Pick up a copy of music book titled: Hanon for Guitar, Alfred Pub. (Amazon) and play in the lower, middle and upper position at first (natural notes-no sharps, flats). Cost around 10.00 and is a great book to learn all the notes and note position up the fret board. Then play all sharps/flats up the neck. Verbalize the notes as much as possible as you play. You will find if you can identify where all the notes are and where they are on the staff paper (music paper) playing is a lot easier and you will make faster progress. Each time you play through the book make a pencil note for a count. Set your goal for twenty times-takes a while but after about 20 times playing it should come natural. Did you know the stats on how many guitar players actually know and can identify each note on the fret board? Only about 20% of players...and ironically enough it's endemic to the guitar only. On most all other instruments, players can id the notes except for cg. And that's the truth, I didn't make it up. (how's my spelling?)
Thanks, David. Appreciate the pointers. I will grab the Hanon book. I got Bruce Arnold's Single String Studies for Classical Guitar and have begun working on those to learn to read and identify the notes on the fretboard. I hope to get here eventually... :)

Cheers!
Another good technique to use, if you're serious about making progress, is get a thing called Composer Template from LongBeachMusic.com (Amazon-under 20 bucks). It's a small plastic template with music notations and includes 50 sheets of staff paper...just make copies and you'll have endless supply. After learning some cords and scale notes (best books for those is called Uncle Tim's Building blocks & Uncle Tim's Book of Cords by Tim Gillespie Mountain Studios Press) these books are primarily for acustic guitar but great to learn all the scales and matching "cowboy" cords and they correspond nicely to the cg. As you learn and practice the scales and matching cords, jot down a few progressions on the staff paper and you can make up a few simple musical pieces. Almost all good cg players compose their own pieces and it's a lot easier than you think.
Hope this helps and remember to listen to what your playing and of course have fun.
David
3 hard things for humans: dentist visit, public speaking, offering forgiveness.

Muse: chg pitch measure rhym feel tempo improvise melody harmonize arpeggios stucco your legato & practice

Carrillo Concert
Yulong Chamber '17
Bozo 123

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