D02 Classical guitar lesson 05

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Lucian Bistreanu
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Lucian Bistreanu » Mon Jan 15, 2018 9:55 am

here is my first attempt at Andante

Ed Butler
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Ed Butler » Mon Jan 15, 2018 1:07 pm

Lucian - like me you have the habit of "not trusting" the left hand , fingers thus causing you to pause between measures. But for you, you have so little movement in your left hand and are very light with your fingers that you can "trust" your fingering and more often than not they will be in the correct place. Keep practicing by not allowing yourself to look at the left hand (something I need to work on also) and your hesitations between measures will go away. Good job.

Ed

Lucian Bistreanu
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Lucian Bistreanu » Mon Jan 15, 2018 2:38 pm

Thank you Ed. I guess you're right, I'll try to practice without looking at the fret board next time.

Lucian

Jules Wilkins
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jules Wilkins » Tue Jan 16, 2018 4:07 am

Hello Lucian.
I am going to make a suggestion that builds upon Ed's observation and hopefully you will find beneficial. Begin your next several practices with a calibration exercise. You place a finger on top of the fifth fret (high E string) and strike it. It will sound muffled if you are hitting the right spot. Now back up the finger ever so slightly and strike again, and keep doing that until you get a good clear note. Note how your finger is just back of the fret. Remember that spot well because that is where you want to be hitting every string on every fret. Now, ease up on the pressure bit by bit while still striking the string, and keep doing this until the string buzzes. Now increase the pressure just a hair so that you once again hear a clean note. You have just discovered the correct pressure required for that string. Do the same on the remaining strings. You should notice that the lower base strings require a tad more pressure, but whatever the pressure I promise you it is a lot less than you are used to applying. Now, go back and play an easy piece...one you know by heart and preferably one that limits your fingers to the first three frets (as that pinky is a lot harder to train). Play the piece a few times with too light a pressure such that every note buzzes just a tad. Then play it again with just that extra bit of pressure. When you are doing this though DO NOT LOOK at your hand, or at least keep practicing until you can do it without looking. You head knows where what strings meet which frets, but it is cheating because it uses your eyes. It is now time to teach your fingers where those magic spots are and what the frets feel like when you hit them just right. Make sure you are using the tips of your fingers and not the pads. Take all of this painfully slow. You are teaching your fingers something that they will simply have to learn sooner or later so it may as well be now.
I am asking a lot of a fellow student, but I am confident that if you do this it will improve your play significantly.
And I have one last request. If you see me not following my own advice, be sure to take me to task. :lol:
"We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve." — Bill Gates
"The biggest room in the world is the room for improvement." — unknown

Lucian Bistreanu
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 188
Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 10:48 pm

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Lucian Bistreanu » Tue Jan 16, 2018 12:28 pm

Hello Jules,
Thank you for your suggestion. Actually I discovered that kind of exercise back when I started learning the guitar (about a year and a half) and I practiced it a little bit just until I forgot about it, as I forgot many others founded on the net.
But today, after reading your comment I did it again with much more positive results than back when I used it for the first time. Now, I guess it's time not to forget to practice it :)
Thank you again!

Lucian

update
I found the video I watched for the left hand
https://youtu.be/4Vps1q31mns

Ed Butler
Student of the online lessons
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Location: Plymouth, MA, USA

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Ed Butler » Tue Jan 16, 2018 1:53 pm

Jules - that is very good advice and something I need to do and will include daily in my practice routine.

Ed

Tom Wimsatt
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Location: Northern Alabama

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Tom Wimsatt » Tue Jan 16, 2018 10:36 pm

My post for Andante Affettuoso. This was a tough one!
1989 Takamine C132S
Yamaha CG-100A

Ed Butler
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 317
Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2016 11:46 am
Location: Plymouth, MA, USA

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Ed Butler » Wed Jan 17, 2018 3:43 pm

Tom - I liked your recording. For me and my practice it made the piece more "accessible". When the instructor plays, it is so fast that to my ear it is sometimes hard to pick up/maintain the "music" of the exercise. Watching you, it is a lot easier for me to better understand the composition of the exercise.

Ed

Jules Wilkins
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Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jules Wilkins » Wed Jan 17, 2018 4:56 pm

:bravo: Hello Tom. In my last post directed at you I encouraged you to take the next step and own the music. I cannot say whether or not those words made an impact, but I can say with confidence that you certainly made Andante Affettuoso your own. I am still working on Soleareas. I frankly don't much like the piece and my initial thought was to submit a rough draft and get on with whatever comes next, but then I listened to your rendition and I knew I too would have to give it my best. Still, hearing your Affettuso makes me want to hurry it along so I too can give that piece a shot. Very well done.
I would do well to leave my post at that, but at the slight risk of being misunderstood I will suggest that you make this piece part of your daily regime for a spell. As you will be the first to admit it is a difficult piece, but with practice it will become an easy piece for you and, given the fact that you clearly understand and enjoy playing it, it will be an excellent choice to add to your repertoire of pieces that you can play flawlessly at the drop of a hat.
"We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve." — Bill Gates
"The biggest room in the world is the room for improvement." — unknown

Tom Wimsatt
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 297
Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2017 10:51 pm
Location: Northern Alabama

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Tom Wimsatt » Wed Jan 17, 2018 9:17 pm

Jules Wilkins wrote:
Wed Jan 17, 2018 4:56 pm
:bravo: Hello Tom. In my last post directed at you I encouraged you to take the next step and own the music. I cannot say whether or not those words made an impact, but I can say with confidence that you certainly made Andante Affettuoso your own. I am still working on Soleareas. I frankly don't much like the piece and my initial thought was to submit a rough draft and get on with whatever comes next, but then I listened to your rendition and I knew I too would have to give it my best. Still, hearing your Affettuso makes me want to hurry it along so I too can give that piece a shot. Very well done.
I would do well to leave my post at that, but at the slight risk of being misunderstood I will suggest that you make this piece part of your daily regime for a spell. As you will be the first to admit it is a difficult piece, but with practice it will become an easy piece for you and, given the fact that you clearly understand and enjoy playing it, it will be an excellent choice to add to your repertoire of pieces that you can play flawlessly at the drop of a hat.
Jules,
I included an attempt at some dynamics to my playing as you suggested in the prior post. My first objective (as a student anyway) is to play as smoothly and error free as possible, this includes adherence to string muting and tempo/volume changes noted in the score. A second(ary) objective is "style", as I'm a bit band-width limited at this stage of learning.

I was a little surprised though, when I listened to my recording (which I decided to post anyway), that the piece sounded as lifeless as it did (my words here, meaning I was a little too cautious on varying tempo and note emphasis). Imagination versus reality....

Anyway, at this stage I feel it is best for me to hit the correct notes, maintain tempo, and reading and following the score. I feel style and dynamics are more important once I get basic skills down. Besides, I just hate to screw up notes.

I do normally use the previous month's music as a warmup/exercise material - I try to "hang on" and to some extent refine certain pieces I like or that I found difficult to learn. The scales we're learning are part of my daily warmups also. I think scales practice is something we all should be doing to help with getting a kinesthetic feel for the fret board (I know, I know, I've heard all about the criticisms of practicing scales but I'm doing it anyway).

What you are doing (D01 and D02 in parallel) is inherently difficult, so don't rush things. Believe it or not, to some extent these lessons build upon each other. I can relate somewhat to your decision regarding entering the D02 program. I decided to skip D01 because I took classical guitar lessons about 25 years ago (approx 2 years). Also, I had nearly finished Frederick Noad's "Solo Guitar Playing Book 1" when I started this program so I thought I was fairly warmed up.

However, I still found the first couple of months of this program very difficult due to it's emphasis on rest strokes (string muting), stopped notes (notes I formerly played as open), and to some extent getting used to recording myself playing. I suspect some of this was at least introduced in D01. This made things frustrating at first. It took me time and effort to get "caught up" so to speak (and to finally realize I'll never play as well as I do when I'm alone).

You're playing great by the way. Practice, practice, practice. We're all in this together. :guitare:
1989 Takamine C132S
Yamaha CG-100A

Tom Wimsatt
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 297
Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2017 10:51 pm
Location: Northern Alabama

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Tom Wimsatt » Wed Jan 17, 2018 9:33 pm

Lucian Bistreanu wrote:
Tue Jan 16, 2018 12:28 pm
Hello Jules,
Thank you for your suggestion. Actually I discovered that kind of exercise back when I started learning the guitar (about a year and a half) and I practiced it a little bit just until I forgot about it, as I forgot many others founded on the net.
But today, after reading your comment I did it again with much more positive results than back when I used it for the first time. Now, I guess it's time not to forget to practice it :)
Thank you again!

Lucian

update
I found the video I watched for the left hand
https://youtu.be/4Vps1q31mns
Lucian, I just now got around to checking that link. Great information. Thanks!!

Here's one I found helpful to me. It involves practicing difficult passages. I follow this procedure religiously, its a good systematic approach that hit home with me:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WkUSKU5OA2E
1989 Takamine C132S
Yamaha CG-100A

Jules Wilkins
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 154
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2017 10:12 pm

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Jules Wilkins » Wed Jan 17, 2018 11:53 pm

Tom Wimsatt wrote:
Wed Jan 17, 2018 9:17 pm
I was a little surprised ... that the piece sounded as lifeless as it did
Ah, the words of a fellow perfectionist. While I applaud your self-critique I cannot imagine any of our fellow students agreeing with you. You varied both tempo and volume and did an admirable job of both.
My first objective (as a student anyway) is to play as smoothly and error free as possible
For me, varying tempo and/or volume interferes little with error free execution. Varying timbre (which necessitates moving the right hand to different locations on the guitar) by contrast interferes hugely. No doubt the difference is attributed to what the right hand has practiced well enough for it to become second nature. If I encounter a difficult piece timing wise I bring out the metronome until I "get it", but then I turn it off and concentrate on the music while trying to learn the piece.
I suspect some of this was at least introduced in D01
Absolutely! By way of example I am working on an "easy" piece currently in D01, except that it requires both rest strokes and string muting of the thumb and as you have pointed out this is difficult. When I am focused and playing slowly I can strike (for example) the A string, bounce the thumb off the D and have it land on the E thus muting it, but it is far from automatic and so I will spend a solid 10 to 15 minutes practicing just that one action on all the strings. Not the most interesting thing to listen to and I am glad my wife doesn't complain. I also find myself asking, is this really necessary....it sounds fine without the muting. But it is probably more about learning the technique than making the piece sound the best, and when I note how you discipline yourself to mute wherever called for despite its difficulty it inspires me to persevere with the exercise. :mouton:
"We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve." — Bill Gates
"The biggest room in the world is the room for improvement." — unknown

Tom Wimsatt
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 297
Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2017 10:51 pm
Location: Northern Alabama

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Tom Wimsatt » Fri Jan 19, 2018 12:08 pm

Kick up your heels Boys and Girls, it's time for Danse Polonaise.
:ivresse:
1989 Takamine C132S
Yamaha CG-100A

Ed Butler
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 317
Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2016 11:46 am
Location: Plymouth, MA, USA

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Ed Butler » Fri Jan 19, 2018 5:55 pm

Tom - I liked it. I carefully watched the movement of your left hand fingers and the transition between notes was smooth, even with the difficult chord starting part B. I just recently began using a guitar support to help with my posture and it feels like I need to "retrain" where my fingers need to be for each note. With the guitar neck higher, I keep missing the A on 3 and hitting the E on 4.

Ed

Tom Wimsatt
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 297
Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2017 10:51 pm
Location: Northern Alabama

Re: D02 Classical guitar lesson 05

Post by Tom Wimsatt » Fri Jan 19, 2018 8:20 pm

Ed Butler wrote:
Fri Jan 19, 2018 5:55 pm
Tom - I liked it. I carefully watched the movement of your left hand fingers and the transition between notes was smooth, even with the difficult chord starting part B. I just recently began using a guitar support to help with my posture and it feels like I need to "retrain" where my fingers need to be for each note. With the guitar neck higher, I keep missing the A on 3 and hitting the E on 4.

Ed
Thanks Ed. I started this piece by playing slow even tempo, and gradually speeding things up over several days. One new thing I tried was to stretch my "a" finger to hit the 5th fret "A" note (towards the beginning of piece) and keeping my LH stationary (at the position where the previous "A" & "C" notes were played) instead of moving the LH down the fret board to hit it. For this piece anyway, this helped me to more accurately position my "a" finger for that note, and to preposition the LH for the subsequent "C/A" notes.

I understand the adjustment problem you're referring to. I hope I never forget/lose my guitar support or I'll be in the same boat!!
Hopefully it won't take you too long to adjust. I like the higher neck position but I forgot that it took some getting used to. I was just relieved it corrected my back pain (not everyone who tries this is successful).
1989 Takamine C132S
Yamaha CG-100A

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