D04 Classical guitar lesson 07

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D04 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Wed Mar 07, 2018 7:51 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D04.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.




First we will study some technical exercises from volume D04.
- page 118 Delcamp, Jean-François Scale n°26



- page 130, 132 Delcamp, Jean-François Improvisation work - D04
These exercises in improvisation are to be done several times a week, for several months.
Vary the volume (mf, pp, ff, p ...), timbres and rhythms. Never play the same thing twice, because it would cease to be improvisation, and would become composition.

16/ Improvise a melody upon the harmonic sequence of Españoleta.


17/ Improvise arpeggios upon the harmonic sequence of Españoleta.


18/ Improvise in chords upon the harmonic sequence of Españoleta.


19/ play and ornament in the style of the period: Españoleta by Gaspar Sanz, page 16 (D03).


20/ make up and play your own divisions on: Españoleta by Gaspar Sanz, page 16 (D03).


Examples of divisions in my PDFs:
D02 pages 40, 41, 42: Ferdinando CARULLI (1770-1841) - VALSE VARIEE Opus 241
The variations are divisions on the valse.

D02 pages 52 and 53: Fernando SOR (1778-1839) - LEÇON VIII & IX opus 60
Leçon IX is a division on leçon VIII.

D03 page 6: Adrian LE ROY (ca. 1520-1598) - PREMIER BRANSLE DE POICTOU
Bars 26 to 48 are a division on bars 1 to 24.

D03 page 9: Guillaume MORLAYE (1510?-1558?) - GAILLARDE
Bars 9 to 16 are a division on bars 1 to 8.

D03 page 14: Francis CUTTING (ca. 1600) - PACKINGTON'S POUND
Bars 9 to 16 are a division on bars 1 to 8. Bars 25 to 32 are a division on bars 17 to 24. Bars 41 to 48 are a division on bars 33 to 40.

D03 page 17: Gaspar SANZ (ca. 1640-1710) - GALLARDA
The second section is a division on the first section.

D04 page 14: Guillaume MORLAYE (1510?-1558?) - GAILLARDE - de "Le second livre de chansons" Paris 1553
Bars 9 to 16 are a division on bars 1 to 8.

D04 page 20: Adrian LE ROY (ca. 1520-1598) - ALMANDE "la mon amy la"
Bars 5 to 8 are a division on bars 1 to 4. Bars 13 to 16 are a division on bars 9 to 12.

D04 page 24: ANONYME (1600) - THE SICK TUNE
Bars 5 to 8 are a division on bars 1 to 4. Bars 13 to 16 are a division on bars 9 to 12.

D05 page 30: Robert JOHNSON (1542-1603) - ALMAN VII
Bars 9 to 16 are a division on bars 1 to 8. Bars 25 to 32 are a division on bars 17 to 24.

D06 page 18: Adrian LE ROY (1520-1598) - PASSEMEZE
Bars 19 to 34 are a division on bars 3 to 18.

D06 page 66: Mauro GIULIANI (1781-1829) - SONATINE opus 71 N°1 - Maestoso
Bars 17 to 32 are a division on bars 1 to 16. Bars 33 to 48 are a division on bars 1 to 16. Bars 49 to 64 are a division on bars 1 to 16.




Finally, we'll look at 4 pieces.
- pages 36, 37 Bach, Johann Sebastian Menuets BWV 1008
This pair of minuets was composed for the cello. At this period musicians would add ornaments to the music when playing the repeats.



- page 44, 45 Carulli, Ferdinando Rondo opus 41 n°3
This rondo is based on contrasts:
forte - piano,
question - response
parallel movement (the different voices rise or fall together) - contrary movement (one voice rises while the other falls)
ascending melody - descending melody,
tension (dominant) - release (tonic)
long values (dotted quarter notes/crotchets) - short values (quarter notes/crotchets)
main key (C major, the tonic) – relative key (G major, the dominant)



- page 72, 73 Carcassi, Matteo Valse opus 23 n°9
this Valse is based on contrasts:
forte - piano,
question - response
parallel movement (the different voices rise or fall together) - contrary movement (one voice rises while the other falls)
ascending melody - descending melody,
tension (dominant) - release (tonic)
long motifs (several bars) - short motifs (one bar)
minor – major



- page 94, 95 Sagreras, Julio Salvador Maria Luisa, Mazurka opus 19
Here we have an accompanied melody. Bring out the melody from the accompaniment. Play the melody with a legato style. Play the accompaniment unobtrusively with a "non legato" or slightly staccato style.




I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
19/ play and ornament in the style of the period: Españoleta by Gaspar Sanz, page 16 (D03).
- page 72, 73 Carcassi, Matteo Valse opus 23 n°9
- page 94, 95 Sagreras, Julio Salvador Maria Luisa, Mazurka opus 19



Good luck!

I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.

Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

ornament in the style of the period: Españoleta
Valse opus 23 n°9
Mazurka opus 19

Chu Bun
ornament in the style of the period: Españoleta
Valse opus 23 n°9
Mazurka opus 19

DaveMoutrie
ornament in the style of the period: Españoleta
Valse opus 23 n°9
Mazurka opus 19

Andrei Puhach
ornament in the style of the period: Españoleta
Valse opus 23 n°9
Mazurka opus 19

Colin Bullock
ornament in the style of the period: Españoleta
Valse opus 23 n°9
Mazurka opus 19
:( + ♫ = :)

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Zafar Haq
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Zafar Haq » Thu Mar 08, 2018 2:35 am

Hi,Classmates,
This month exam qualifying exercises music sheet breakdown. :)


-19/ play and ornament in the style of the period: Españoleta by Gaspar Sanz, page 16 (D03)
- page 72, 73 Carcassi, Matteo Valse opus 23 n°9
- page 94, 95 Sagreras, Julio Salvador Maria Luisa, Mazurka opus 19

a.19/ play and ornament in the style of the period: Españoleta by Gaspar Sanz, page 16 (D03)
Few Ornaments in music are"Trill,Upper mordent,Lower mordent,Turn,Appoggiatura, Acciaccatura"
Definitions: Trill: "A rapid alternation between the specified note and the next higher note (according to key signature) within its duration, also called a "shake". When followed by a wavy horizontal line, this symbol indicates an extended, or running, trill. In modern music the trill begins on the main note and ends with the lower auxiliary note then the main note, which requires a triplet immediately before the turn. In music up to the time of Haydn or Mozart the trill begins on the upper auxiliary note and there is no triplet.[11] In percussion notation, a trill is sometimes used to indicate a tremolo (q.v.)."wiki
"Upper mordent
Rapidly play the principal note, the next higher note (according to key signature) then return to the principal note for the remaining duration. In most music, the mordent begins on the auxiliary note, and the alternation between the two notes may be extended. In handbells, this symbol is a "shake" and indicates the rapid shaking of the bells for the duration of the note."wiki
"Lower mordent (inverted)
Rapidly play the principal note, the note below it, then return to the principal note for the remaining duration. In much music, the mordent begins on the auxiliary note, and the alternation between the two notes may be extended."wiki
"Turn
When placed directly above the note, the turn (also known as a gruppetto) indicates a sequence of upper auxiliary note, principal note, lower auxiliary note, and a return to the principal note. When placed to the right of the note, the principal note is played first, followed by the above pattern. Placing a vertical line through the turn symbol or inverting it, it indicates an inverted turn, in which the order of the auxiliary notes is reversed."wiki
"Appoggiatura
The first half of the principal note's duration has the pitch of the grace note (the first two-thirds if the principal note is a dotted note)."wiki
"Acciaccatura
The acciaccatura is of very brief duration, as though brushed on the way to the principal note, which receives virtually all of its notated duration. In percussion notation, the acciaccatura symbol denotes the flam rudiment, the miniature note still positioned behind the main note but on the same line or space of the staff. The flam note is usually played just before the natural durational subdivision the main note is played on, with the timing and duration of the main note remaining unchanged. Also known by the English translation of the Italian term, crushed note, and in German as Zusammenschlag (simultaneous stroke)."wiki

1.Time Signature: 3/4
2.Tempo:144
3.Strokes: Not defined
4.Measures:24
5.Phrases: Not defined
6.Damping: Yes,6
7.Repeats: Yes,measure 1 to 8,measure 9 to 16, and volta brackets at m16,17
Definition:"Volta brackets (1st and 2nd endings, or 1st- and 2nd-time bars)
A repeated passage is to be played with different endings on different playing; it is possible to have more than two endings (1st, 2nd, 3rd ...)."
8.Special effects:No
9.Sharp/Flat Symbol:Yes,"b flat"
10.Lyrics: No
11.Rest:Yes,quarter note m 1,9,11,17,18,19, and half note with dot at m 1,9,
12. Articulation marks.No
13.Improvisation:No
14.Slur:
15.Ornament:No
16.Tie:No
17.Accidentals sharp/flat/natural:Yes, sharp at m 15,19,22,23,and natural at m 20,22,23,
18.Barre:Yes at m 8

b. page 72, 73 Carcassi, Matteo Valse opus 23 n°9
en la mineur

1.Time Signature:3/8
2.Tempo:138
3.Strokes:Not defined
4.Measures:52
5.Phrases:Not defined
6.Damping:Yes,14
7.Repeats:Yes,m 1 to 9,m 10 to 26,m 27 to 35,m 36 to 52,D.C al Fine at last measure,Fine repeat from m 1 to Fine.
8.Special effects:Yes,Dynamics,
ff="Fortissimo
Very loud. Usually the loudest indication in a piece, though louder dynamics are often specified with additional fs (such as fortississimo."

mf="Mezzo forte
Moderately loud; softer than forte. If no dynamic appears, mezzo-forte is assumed to be the prevailing dynamic level."

f="Forte
Loud. Used as often as piano to indicate contrast."

sf="Sforzando
Literally "forced", denotes an abrupt, fierce accent on a single sound or chord. When written out in full, it applies to the sequence of sounds or chords under or over which it is placed."wiki

p="Piano
Soft; louder than pianissimo."

Crescendo
"A gradual increase in volume.
Can be extended under many notes to indicate that the volume steadily increases during the passage."

decrescendo
"A gradual decrease in volume. Can be extended in the same manner as crescendo."wiki
9.# symbol:Yes at m 27,C#,F#,G#
11.Rest:Yes,1/8th note at m 7,8,10,24,25,27,37,44,
12. Articulation:No
13.Improvisation:No
14.Slur:Yes at m 11,13,15,27,28,29,30,31,32,33,45,46,47,48,49,50,51
15.Ornament:No
16.Tie:No
17.sharp/flat/natural:Yes,sharp at m 3,5,6,16,18,20,21,22,30,32,37,47,
18.Barre:No
Definition:dolce "sweetly eg: dolcissimo = as sweet as possible"


c.page 94, 95 Sagreras, Julio Salvador Maria Luisa, Mazurka opus 19

1.Time Signature: 3/4
2.Tempo:Tiempo de Mazurka 108
3.Strokes: Not defined
4.Measures:48
5.Phrases: Not defined
6.Damping: Yes,27
7.Repeats: Yes,"D.C. al Fine", last measure to repeat from first measure to "Fine"m 32
8.Special effects:No
9.Sharp Symbol:No
10.Lyrics: No
11.Rest:Yes,
12. Articulation.No
13.Improvisation:No
14.Slur:
15.Ornament:No
16.Tie:No
17.sharp/flat:Yes, sharp at m
18.Barre:No
Last edited by Zafar Haq on Sat Mar 10, 2018 5:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Chu Bun
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Chu Bun » Fri Mar 09, 2018 6:08 pm

Has anybody tries the Carcassi's piece? It looks like this will be a very long month!

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Kirkland Gavin » Fri Mar 09, 2018 7:43 pm

Im still on 3 an 4 just going through and checking out the lessons. I have a ways to go yet.

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Colin Bullock » Fri Mar 09, 2018 10:24 pm

Chu Bun wrote:
Fri Mar 09, 2018 6:08 pm
Has anybody tries the Carcassi's piece? It looks like this will be a very long month!
Haven’t yet posted last month’s, yes it’s going to be a long one haven’t looked at this months yet.

“Zafar Haq” wrote:
Thanks Zafar.
Will you be joining us next year?

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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by DaveMoutrie » Sat Mar 10, 2018 11:18 am

Chu Bun wrote:
Fri Mar 09, 2018 6:08 pm
Has anybody tries the Carcassi's piece? It looks like this will be a very long month!
Just had a play through - The Carcassi piece certainly requires a high degree of left handed digital dexterity. I'm just hoping that once it is committed to memory it will be a little easier, since it will then be possible to keep a closer eye on what the left hand is doing.

Thankfully the Sagreras seems a lot easier. I have three catch up pieces to do as well as this month's pieces. For this reason I have to consider ways of optimising my practice time for greater efficiency.
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by DaveMoutrie » Sun Mar 11, 2018 2:22 pm

Just been having another look at the Carcassi.

Is anyone else having a problem with the pull off from the G to the F in bar 12 of the piece. The issue is, with the 3rd finger on the base, my little finger is in a very bent position so can't pull back very much.



Other than change the fingering, or omit the slur altogether, the only solution seems to be to pull up and away from the fret board rather than just down.

Any ideas would be most welcome.
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Andrei Puhach » Tue Mar 13, 2018 4:47 am

DaveMoutrie wrote:
Sun Mar 11, 2018 2:22 pm
Just been having another look at the Carcassi.

Is anyone else having a problem with the pull off from the G to the F in bar 12 of the piece. The issue is, with the 3rd finger on the base, my little finger is in a very bent position so can't pull back very much.



Other than change the fingering, or omit the slur altogether, the only solution seems to be to pull up and away from the fret board rather than just down.

Any ideas would be most welcome.
Keeping the 3rd finger almost flat to the strings helps a lot ;)
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Andrei Puhach » Tue Mar 13, 2018 5:01 am

Andrei Puhach wrote:
Tue Mar 13, 2018 4:47 am
DaveMoutrie wrote:
Sun Mar 11, 2018 2:22 pm
Just been having another look at the Carcassi.

Is anyone else having a problem with the pull off from the G to the F in bar 12 of the piece. The issue is, with the 3rd finger on the base, my little finger is in a very bent position so can't pull back very much.



Other than change the fingering, or omit the slur altogether, the only solution seems to be to pull up and away from the fret board rather than just down.

Any ideas would be most welcome.
Keeping the 3rd finger almost flat to the strings helps a lot ;)
Here is how I was doing it. Requires a very short nail on the 4th finger.
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by DaveMoutrie » Tue Mar 13, 2018 8:50 am

Thanks for the tip Andrie, that does help a little. I found getting the thumb onto a better position on the back of the neck helps as well. It's still a struggle though. The only other things I can think of is stretching exercises and lots of practice.

BTW, love the video showing the LH from different angles. you have a good camera person there.
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Andrei Puhach » Sun Mar 18, 2018 5:20 am

DaveMoutrie wrote:
Tue Mar 13, 2018 8:50 am
Thanks for the tip Andrie, that does help a little. I found getting the thumb onto a better position on the back of the neck helps as well. It's still a struggle though. The only other things I can think of is stretching exercises and lots of practice.

BTW, love the video showing the LH from different angles. you have a good camera person there.
Thanks, but now I realize that it is difficult to position the fingers correctly. Once they are already in place it is easy to play. That transition from measure 11 to 12 is rather tricky.
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by DaveMoutrie » Sun Mar 18, 2018 7:47 am

Andrei Puhach wrote:
Sun Mar 18, 2018 5:20 am
DaveMoutrie wrote:
Tue Mar 13, 2018 8:50 am
Thanks for the tip Andrie, that does help a little. I found getting the thumb onto a better position on the back of the neck helps as well. It's still a struggle though. The only other things I can think of is stretching exercises and lots of practice.

BTW, love the video showing the LH from different angles. you have a good camera person there.
Thanks, but now I realize that it is difficult to position the fingers correctly. Once they are already in place it is easy to play. That transition from measure 11 to 12 is rather tricky.
Any idea why this should be?

This is a transition from a C chord to a G chord. The third finger simply crosses over from the 5th string to the 6th string. However, the third finger must be both placed accurately and straightened out. Meanwhile the 4th finger must be placed on the 1st string both simultaniously and at the same time as well. There really is quite a lot going on here in one move.

Do you practice any string crossing exercises such as the one in Pumping Nylon?

Unfortunately I am once again reminded of the deep folly of DIY for classical guitarists. As a result of smashing up large lumps of concrete with a hammer and chisle - followed by some tree lopping, I have a very swollen middle finger and restricted movement of my left hand. As a result of this I am temporarily (I hope) unable to practice. :(
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Andrei Puhach » Mon Mar 19, 2018 2:08 am

DaveMoutrie wrote:
Sun Mar 18, 2018 7:47 am
Andrei Puhach wrote:
Sun Mar 18, 2018 5:20 am
DaveMoutrie wrote:
Tue Mar 13, 2018 8:50 am
Thanks for the tip Andrie, that does help a little. I found getting the thumb onto a better position on the back of the neck helps as well. It's still a struggle though. The only other things I can think of is stretching exercises and lots of practice.

BTW, love the video showing the LH from different angles. you have a good camera person there.
Thanks, but now I realize that it is difficult to position the fingers correctly. Once they are already in place it is easy to play. That transition from measure 11 to 12 is rather tricky.
Any idea why this should be?

This is a transition from a C chord to a G chord. The third finger simply crosses over from the 5th string to the 6th string. However, the third finger must be both placed accurately and straightened out. Meanwhile the 4th finger must be placed on the 1st string both simultaniously and at the same time as well. There really is quite a lot going on here in one move.

Do you practice any string crossing exercises such as the one in Pumping Nylon?
I mostly practice right hand finger crossing by playing a G melodic minor scale passage (see the attachment) with 3 and 4 fingers only as part of my warm up routine (this is a universal scale pattern, can be played from any fret. If played in first position it is a good stretch exercise for the left hand as well):
G Minor Scale Passage from A. Nosov School.png
This from the Guitar School by Andrey Nosov (g i t a r a n o s o v . r u), lesson #99.
Even though it says to use 'i' and 'm' I play it with 'm' and 'a'. I do this every day but still not good at it, keep missing notes. Especially, the ascending part.

For the left hand I like playing chromatic octaves (Level IV of Ricardo Iznaola's book).
DaveMoutrie wrote:
Sun Mar 18, 2018 7:47 am
Unfortunately I am once again reminded of the deep folly of DIY for classical guitarists. As a result of smashing up large lumps of concrete with a hammer and chisle - followed by some tree lopping, I have a very swollen middle finger and restricted movement of my left hand. As a result of this I am temporarily (I hope) unable to practice. :(
Oh man... That's not good... Hope you'll recover soon and can resume your practice. I read a lot of advices saying not to play when in any kind of pain (which makes perfect sense). Get all the rest you need.

[a bit off-topic comes next, some of my memories, not useful contribution to the lesson, feel free to skip]
I used to do A LOT of labor when I was a teenager. Basically, I grew up in a village, we've got tons of stuff to do. Then my family built a house from scratch using minimum machinery (90% of the work was done by my parents, grandpa, me and my brother). Also did some heavy lifting. Somehow I tried not to use any hand protection, was kind of proud of my strong and callused laborer hands :) Fortunately, I never ever had any traumas or strains caused by work or heavy lifting. As soon as I stopped that my hands went back to normal.
Now I'm not doing much physically, except a recent occasion when I did some lumberjack work (which I love since childhood). The next day was a lucky day as I was able to play as usual, no pain.
The worst thing which happened to my hands (which could have caused me to stop playing guitar forever) was a flexor tendon cut in the left thumb (which was "rewired" by an orthopedic surgeon). This one makes it possible to squeeze the thumb tip and other fingers. Also, to keep it on the other back of the neck to compensate pressure of the other fingers.
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Last edited by Andrei Puhach on Mon Mar 19, 2018 2:14 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Andrei Puhach » Mon Mar 19, 2018 2:12 am

[dup deleted]
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Re: D04 Classical guitar lesson 07

Post by Colin Bullock » Mon Mar 19, 2018 8:50 am

DaveMoutrie wrote:
Tue Mar 13, 2018 8:50 am
Andrei Puhach wrote:
Sun Mar 18, 2018 5:20 am
Thanks for these very useful posts.
I’ve found D04 quite demanding with 3 full pieces to post each month. These conversations with you 2 and Chu have been really helpful - plus your inspirational playing :D
Thanks

Just grateful the exam isnt until end May!

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