Working in healthcare?

Talk about things that are not necessarily related to music or the guitar.
razz
Posts: 346
Joined: Mon Nov 15, 2010 1:01 am

Working in healthcare?

Post by razz » Sat Nov 25, 2017 12:34 pm

I'm involved in a project about people that work in heath care and also play and or perform music.

If you work in health care, please send me a sentence or two about why you chose your line of work or why you continue.

If you can offer a story about your work, please type it.

I would like to hear from you even if your work, in a health care facility, does not directly involve patient management. (HVAC, courier, parking, IT, etc., please add your input)

As always, thanks for your help.

Keith
Posts: 1306
Joined: Sun May 06, 2012 5:48 pm
Location: Land of Daniel Boone

Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by Keith » Sat Nov 25, 2017 12:49 pm

I always wondered how folks wear latex gloves with nails or perform surgery with nails ? do health care workers not play classical guitar? do health care workers not use nails?
be true to the one you love but have many flings with different guitars

guitarras en la espiritu de la:
Marcelo Barbero
Jose Ramirez III

User avatar
bear
Posts: 3788
Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2012 10:55 pm
Location: Massachusetts

Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by bear » Sat Nov 25, 2017 1:00 pm

I worked as a psychologist for a couple of decades. My main interest was in brain function. This to say, I didn't care much about why you hated your mother, were afraid of clowns or felt lonely. I was more interested in your left temporal lobe or your hypothalamus. However, dealing with those other issues kept the doors open.
I really can't say why I chose that profession. I was in school (13 years in college), following those things that interested me and ended up with a bunch of degrees. The most advanced was in Psychology. I'd always expected to be a Vulcanologist or Architect but the brain was and still is fascinating. I suppose it's not unlike music. The basic components are the same for all but one change in a note, time signature, etc. one change in a dendrite, makes all the difference.
2013 Jeff Medlin '37 Hauser 640mm sp
2006 Michele Della Giustina Concert 10 string 650mm ce
2005 Jose Ramirez 4E 650mm ce
2005 Manuel Rodriguez Model C3F 650mm sp
2003 Manuel Rodriguez Model D 650mm ce

Laudiesdad69
Posts: 2092
Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2016 1:16 pm

Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by Laudiesdad69 » Sat Nov 25, 2017 2:32 pm

I used to work as a Respiratory Therapist in a hospital. In Healthcare, you pick which secretions you would rather deal with, and poop wasn't one I wanted to deal with (was an LPN before that). It was interesting enough work, paid well, and I didn't have to wipe butts. I was also good at doing the math involved with ventilating patients.

At the hospital where I worked, you weren't allowed to have long nails, or even painted nails. It was an infection control measure. I didn't start playing CG until after I quit working in healthcare, so it didn't really affect me.
Last edited by Laudiesdad69 on Mon Nov 27, 2017 12:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

razz
Posts: 346
Joined: Mon Nov 15, 2010 1:01 am

Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by razz » Sun Nov 26, 2017 12:51 pm

Keith wrote:
Sat Nov 25, 2017 12:49 pm
I always wondered how folks wear latex gloves with nails or perform surgery with nails ? do health care workers not play classical guitar? do health care workers not use nails?
Health care facilities don't use latex anymore because of allergic reactions. Most gloves are nitrile.

I keep my nails short enough so that I don't puncture my gloves. My work in the clinical laboratory does not involve contact with patients, so gloves serve to protect me. The few people that I know who play classical guitar and work in health care, have developed some way to accommodate their work rules about finger nails. Most keep their nails shorter and use a cotton glove liner. I know a neurologist, a cardiologist, and a pathologist that play classical guitar, but no surgeons.

Andrew Pohlman
Posts: 1237
Joined: Tue Nov 10, 2015 8:24 pm
Location: SF Bay Area

Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by Andrew Pohlman » Mon Nov 27, 2017 8:28 pm

For the money. I continue in this profession for the money. I was a computer professional and at the time of the dot com crash, I needed a new job or profession. Nurses were needed at that time, so I went back to school and changed professions. I am now a Nurse Educator at a state prison. I'm here because they accommodate my physical injuries, else I cannot imagine choosing to work at a prison hospital, even as an educator.

SO I started out with money in mind, but I discovered that I actually have human compassion. I did have to change my thinking patterns from computer engineering to human care models. But here I am teaching nurses how to be nurses after starting by only seeking a good paycheck. :D
2013 Rodriguez FF Sabicas blanco
2015 Trevor Gore custom Neoclassical
- redwood top, Palo dorado B+Ss.

razz
Posts: 346
Joined: Mon Nov 15, 2010 1:01 am

Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by razz » Tue Nov 28, 2017 6:22 pm

Andrew Pohlman wrote:
Mon Nov 27, 2017 8:28 pm
For the money. I continue in this profession for the money. I was a computer professional and at the time of the dot com crash, I needed a new job or profession. Nurses were needed at that time, so I went back to school and changed professions. I am now a Nurse Educator at a state prison. I'm here because they accommodate my physical injuries, else I cannot imagine choosing to work at a prison hospital, even as an educator.

SO I started out with money in mind, but I discovered that I actually have human compassion. I did have to change my thinking patterns from computer engineering to human care models. But here I am teaching nurses how to be nurses after starting by only seeking a good paycheck. :D
Can you tell me about a time when you knew that you (or you and your team) provided a remedy?

Andrew Pohlman
Posts: 1237
Joined: Tue Nov 10, 2015 8:24 pm
Location: SF Bay Area

Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by Andrew Pohlman » Tue Nov 28, 2017 7:56 pm

razz wrote:
Tue Nov 28, 2017 6:22 pm
Andrew Pohlman wrote:
Mon Nov 27, 2017 8:28 pm
For the money. I continue in this profession for the money. I was a computer professional and at the time of the dot com crash, I needed a new job or profession. Nurses were needed at that time, so I went back to school and changed professions. I am now a Nurse Educator at a state prison. I'm here because they accommodate my physical injuries, else I cannot imagine choosing to work at a prison hospital, even as an educator.

SO I started out with money in mind, but I discovered that I actually have human compassion. I did have to change my thinking patterns from computer engineering to human care models. But here I am teaching nurses how to be nurses after starting by only seeking a good paycheck. :D
Can you tell me about a time when you knew that you (or you and your team) provided a remedy?
Too many to count. After all, easing pain and saving lives is what nurses do on a daily basis! :D And by "remedy" I assume you mean the overall outcome was positive. Some scenarios are convoluted and would be a chapter in a book! :D

The easiest scenario is when a cardiac patient went into arrest. My start of shift assessment showed his pulse to be really weak, or "thready" as we say. I had a hunch something bad would happen based upon that one criteria - and it did. When I found him unresponsive, I hit the code blue button, started compressions, delegated to someone to get the crash cart. By the time the cart arrived, there were 3 of us taking turn doing compressions and bagging. We hooked him up to the monitor and found Vfib (ventricular fibrillation) - a classic shockable rhythm. We started giving drugs per protocol, and after the 3rd shock, we got pulses. So we saved a life doing what we are trained, and paid, to do. At the time, it ruined my day, and felt like a lot of extra work. Then the family met with me a few days later and gave me high praise for saving "grandpa". Not so much for the old geezer, but I felt great that I participated in making that family very happy.
2013 Rodriguez FF Sabicas blanco
2015 Trevor Gore custom Neoclassical
- redwood top, Palo dorado B+Ss.

eyedoc
Posts: 527
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2012 4:39 am

Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by eyedoc » Tue Nov 28, 2017 10:04 pm

I am an Ophthalmologist of 34 years, and play classical guitar and flute. I practice guitar every morning from 6:15 AM, including the days that I do surgery (cataract, LASIK). It wakes up the right hemisphere of the brain and also my warms up my dexterity. Wearing gloves is no problem with right hand nails. I perform in a duo, and we play at several senior homes, where I am often playing for 10-20 of my post-op cataract patients. They enjoy seeing the "other side" of their doctor, and we are often requested back to perform.
Ron

eyedoc
Posts: 527
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2012 4:39 am

Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by eyedoc » Tue Nov 28, 2017 10:05 pm

That's 34 years in practice, I'm 63....

steve f
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Nov 29, 2017 5:51 pm

Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by steve f » Wed Nov 29, 2017 6:42 pm

I am a Hand surgeon and have been playing guitar since childhood.
My love of the guitar was instrumental :) in leading me toward that specialty.
It is the only profession I ever seriously considered since childhood.
I would refer to myself as a doctor since age 3 - can't really say why.
There was a stretch of time when I was quite burned out by the profession and the system.
I found a supportive meditation practice and that has helped me to rediscover my passion and motivation for working in a profession that allows me to get to know people and help them through difficult times in their lives.
Playing and listening to music has always been a great source of comfort and support throughout my life.

Jeffrey Wijnans
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 25
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2017 1:49 pm
Location: The Netherlands

Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by Jeffrey Wijnans » Wed Nov 29, 2017 7:49 pm

I work at a hospital as a physical therapist specializing in treating patients with cancer. I like my job because I can dictate my own agenda, got opportunities to grow and they pay for my education. In a few years I hope to do research to improve the quality of our current healthcare, especially for people with head and neck cancer.

I play guitar when I get back home and the kids are of to bed, on the weekends I try to sneak in some more practice time. Would like to do more but balancing work, research, sport, friends, family and guitar can be tough from time to time. But I guess we've all got these moments in our life.

Dawnpod
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Dec 07, 2017 10:13 pm
Location: Salisbury, England

Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by Dawnpod » Sat Dec 16, 2017 6:21 pm

Dear Razz
What an interesting project - are you a researcher? I am a podiatrist and lecturer in podiatry. I became interested in foot and lower limb function when I was a nurse working for the army medical services (we saw a lot of foot/ankle/ leg injuries). I have only been playing CG for two years. For me it is recreational and therapeutic, I am fortunate to have a great CG teacher and am making steady progress. Like the other folks who have responded, I find fitting in time for practising challenging- but I try to play at least 5 times per week.
Best wishes
Dawn

Ceciltguitar
Posts: 151
Joined: Sun Dec 14, 2014 2:15 am
Location: Virginia

Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by Ceciltguitar » Sun Dec 17, 2017 4:09 am

I am an optometrist. I became interested in optometry after having an eye exam when I was about 30 years old. At the time I was serving on shore duty in the Navy. I chose to become an optometrist because I believed that it would be a good way to earn a decent income doing something that helps people. I wanted to be able to go home every day knowing that I had helped people. That is still what motivates me every day.

User avatar
Contreras
Posts: 841
Joined: Sun Jun 15, 2014 12:13 am
Location: In the Wind

Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by Contreras » Sun Dec 17, 2017 12:22 pm

I am a dentist, practice limited to root canal therapy. I enjoy the work and the money is good enough.
I have played guitar all my life, long before I became a dentist ... I guess manual dexterity plays into both, but music is the passion, healthcare the means to keep the balls in the air.
Rubber gloves are not a problem with nails ... I change them several times in any procedure. Sometimes I can nick the edge of a nail with the drill ... irritating but not terminal.
Anyone else think Fakebook has done enough damage yet?

Return to “The Café”