Working in healthcare?

Talk about things that are not necessarily related to music or the guitar.
razz
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Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by razz » Sun Dec 17, 2017 6:58 pm

Dawnpod wrote:
Sat Dec 16, 2017 6:21 pm
Dear Razz
What an interesting project - are you a researcher?
Hi Dawn,
I'm not a researcher. A local jazz musician plans to record some health care workers who are also musicians. He has recruited some other music professionals to help.

The theme of the project is "Remedy". The idea is to present (and record) music that serves as a remedy to health care workers and patients.

Ceciltguitar
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Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by Ceciltguitar » Sun Dec 17, 2017 8:10 pm

FWIW, I played for awhile in an Irish music band called Leigheas that included two dentists, a physician, and a clinical psychologist. Other members included a professional musician / music teacher (violin), and a teacher. 4 of us were retired military.

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mverive
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Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by mverive » Sun Dec 17, 2017 11:16 pm

I'm a pediatrician, currently working in General Pediatrics, but worked in Pediatric Critical Care for 18 of the last 20 years. One of my former hospitals had a Music Therapist who played guitar in the ICU and general wards, and at my last hospital I would play for patients along with a harpist. We often played classical, renaissance, Irish and Celtic pieces together.

As for what drew me to healthcare, I had a great pediatrician growing up, and have always loved working with children, so after obtaining my degree in Chemistry and working in a flavor and fragrance company for 7 years, I decided at the age of 29 to go to med school and pursue pediatrics. During my pediatric rotations I found that I really enjoyed treating the most critically ill and injured children, so completed a fellowship in Pediatric Critical Care medicine. Although I enjoyed the work immensely, after working essentially every other week, a week at a time, on call 24/7, I decided to return to General Pediatrics.

I try to find time to practice CG, although with two daughters in school, dance, and music (one taking oboe, the other Suzuki Violin), there's not much time left for CG (also busy with programming and 3D printing).

So much to do, so little time!
"(P)Lay on, MacDuff, And damn'd be him that first cries, 'Hold, enough!'"

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Petemayo
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Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by Petemayo » Tue Dec 19, 2017 12:16 am

Now into my third decade in healthcare as a hospital chaplain. I feel as though I am there for people at their most vulnerable and sometimes most tragic times with a nonjudgmental, non preachy companionship. As an introvert I was surprised to discover how much Ilove people. I also play for memorials, Masses and other small events.

razz
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Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by razz » Tue Dec 19, 2017 1:55 pm

Petemayo wrote:
Tue Dec 19, 2017 12:16 am
Now into my third decade in healthcare as a hospital chaplain. I feel as though I am there for people at their most vulnerable and sometimes most tragic times with a nonjudgmental, non preachy companionship. As an introvert I was surprised to discover how much Ilove people. I also play for memorials, Masses and other small events.
A colleague's daughter finished seminary studies and took an internship with a hospital's chapel. I told her that I thought that it was the toughest job in the building. She agreed with me.... after she worked a shift. She's moved on to other interests but still covers a few shifts a month.
I don't know how you do the work, but I'm glad that you continue.

GMR
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Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by GMR » Tue Dec 19, 2017 3:46 pm

I work in a Public Health environment. My role is in biomedical equipment/medical device maintenance management. I came from an Air Force electronic background which made for a good fit into medical equipment maintenance and repair. The public health aspect is by far the most rewarding aspect of my career. My guitar influences were a result of my Father, when I was very young. I lingered over learning guitar until recent years.
Garland

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Petemayo
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Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by Petemayo » Tue Dec 19, 2017 5:51 pm

razz wrote:
Tue Dec 19, 2017 1:55 pm
A colleague's daughter finished seminary studies and took an internship with a hospital's chapel. I told her that I thought that it was the toughest job in the building. She agreed with me.... after she worked a shift. She's moved on to other interests but still covers a few shifts a month.
I don't know how you do the work, but I'm glad that you continue.
Thank you. It is very rewarding and challenging. I do take a deep breath before something like Sudden Infant deaths at the ER and traumas.

I keep a pawn shop guitar at work for stress relief. But I have to say that I have been playing so much I aggravated a thumb injury. I need to give it a rest even though I am really enjoying some John Dowland pieces.

swestfisher
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Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by swestfisher » Fri Dec 29, 2017 9:26 pm

I'm the Chief Information Officer for a multi-site primary care clinic and home health agency. I started out as a computer programmer and I received a good job offer out of college in healthcare. I've stayed in healthcare all my career due to wanting to help and make a difference. More recently I want to work in a rural and undeserved area and so found my current job in northeast Vermont.
Steve

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David Gutowski
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Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by David Gutowski » Mon Jan 15, 2018 5:18 am

I don't work in health care but I did work as a junior high special education teacher for forty years helping learning disabled and severely challenged children. I loved my job helping children learn and deal with their problems. One of the reasons I'm responding to the post is because I think classical guitar playing would help surgeons and other doctors who use their hands; helps with coordination and hand muscle development and relaxation. Unless you actually work and try to help children you may not be aware of how stressful the job can be.
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Tomzooki
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Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by Tomzooki » Mon Jan 15, 2018 4:56 pm

I am a community pharmacist. What I love in that job - I know it sounds cliché - is that we are in a position where we can help people a lot; we are by far the most accessible healthcare workers, and often we are the first people come to see when they have health issues. We also have a lot of contact with regular clients: they come once a month to get their medication, Most of the time they trust us and often seek advice, ask questions concerning their health issues or their medication. Of course we cannot fix everything, but by doing what we can, and redirect people toward appropriated ressources when needed, or contact their physician to discuss a health issue, we can do a lot.
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Dmitrypey
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Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by Dmitrypey » Tue Jan 30, 2018 10:35 pm

I am an Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon.
I work in the private practice and also cover trauma for several local hospitals. I love what I do, and virtually all of my hobbies involve working with my hands.
Have been playing classical guitar sunce I was 17. Mostly self taught, had only 2-3 months worth of lessons.
I love playing latin american music, such as Reis and Barrios.
My other hobbies are Judo and woodworking.
Next project: planning to built a guitar :)
Love this site. Thank you all for your wonderful posts.
Last edited by Dmitrypey on Tue Jan 30, 2018 11:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Stickyhead
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Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by Stickyhead » Tue Jan 30, 2018 11:06 pm

I work in the I.T sector of healthcare. I research and test new technologies, build virtual desktops/environments, I love writing scripts to remotely manage the hardware and software in our environment. I am basicly a system admin.

Stickyhead
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Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by Stickyhead » Tue Jan 30, 2018 11:06 pm

I work in the I.T sector of healthcare. I research and test new technologies, build virtual desktops/environments, I love writing scripts to remotely manage the hardware and software in our environment. I am basicly a system admin.

BellyDoc
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Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by BellyDoc » Wed Jan 31, 2018 6:28 am

razz wrote:
Sat Nov 25, 2017 12:34 pm
I'm involved in a project about people that work in heath care and also play and or perform music.

If you work in health care, please send me a sentence or two about why you chose your line of work or why you continue.

If you can offer a story about your work, please type it.

I would like to hear from you even if your work, in a health care facility, does not directly involve patient management. (HVAC, courier, parking, IT, etc., please add your input)

As always, thanks for your help.
You're going to get more than a sentence or two...

I went into the field of medicine because I had the sense that it was an endeavor that utilized a broad range of skills that could be brought to bear all at the same time in the service of people when they needed help the most. Although I will still say that I was correct in those assessments, I would have to also say that I really had NO CLUE what I was getting into at the time, and furthermore, that I wasn't even equipped to articulate better questions so that I could understand more.

Medical training is a transformational experience. Change is difficult and painful. For me, it's been a positive transformation but not everyone has the same experience. What drew me into medicine was fantasy. What happened after that was that I grew up. What keeps me here is that the man I became is the right fit for the work, and the work is the right fit for the man.

What I do is part detective work, part science, and part art. There's really nothing else I can compare to by way of an analogy to explain the feelings without also feeling like I'm selling it short. The sense of honor in being entrusted, moments of human connection when "patients" are just "people", the satisfaction of successful diagnosis and intervention, pride in accomplishment, flashes of insight, and even lucky moments of serendipitous discovery are my rewards. They balance against the failed connections, the untreatable pain, and the dread of those cases that will ultimately go wrong even when everything goes right. They balance just enough to keep me going.

Every patient is a story, and every story is worth telling and remembering. I can't in good conscience pick one patient's story and just tell it like it's a "this guy walks into a bar" joke because it feels like that de-humanizes all the other worthy stories. Instead, let me tell you a story my father told me. He was also a doctor and this story carries a lesson about doctoring.

My father described a day as an intern when he was doing assessments in the ER. In one room, he visited with an elderly couple. The husband was in bad shape. He had apparently just had a major stroke and was unable to communicate or move, the man was critically ill and clearly dying. My father and others had evaluated the patient and there wasn't anything they could do. The wife was distracted with grief and had a hard time absorbing the information. My father, as the intern, was left to tend to her and answer her questions (over and over) as she grappled with this terminal situation. The patient soon passed away, and my father worked to comfort the distraught wife with little sense of effect. Soon, he was replaced by clergy, left the room, collected himself and moved on to his next assigned patient. In the next room, he was assigned to an otherwise healthy young man who had cut his hand on broken glass, accompanied by his mother. The mother was very agitated, perhaps in a bit of panic state. Dad described how she was talking with pressured speech, asking questions and not letting him answer, interfering with him while he was trying to examine the wound, and generally inhibiting care. He became angry with her and according to him, he "had words" with her to get her to stop. Now... I knew my father... and I'm guessing that this meant he turned to her, did his STARE and said, "PLEASE." and she went silent. It always worked on me, so that's how I imagine it. He sutured up the young man and then afterward he was discussing the cases with his supervisor. He described how angry he felt with this mother torturing him while he was trying to take care of the boy, and how he wanted to turn to her in anger and yell that in the next room, a man had just DIED leaving his wife alone in the world and if anyone deserved to be in a bad state it was THAT woman! His supervisor replied, "You can't carry baggage from one bedside to the next. She's just being a normal mother."

You can't carry baggage from one bedside to the next...

I didn't really understand that till I was an intern myself. It's normal and human to judge, categorize, and otherwise carry preconceptions about people based on how they look, act, speak or even smell. We're hardwired to recognize patterns in the world and anticipate the future based on the past. However, as a doctor, I have to do better than that. I have to differentiate between what I know and what I think. My impressions about people may be affected by my past experiences, but everyone needs to start with a clean slate. The more I examine it, the more I realize how much baggage I really do carry from bedside to bedside, and how much of a burden it places on my process. Honestly, I don't know that it can be completely eliminated. I work to minimize it, accept that it's a potential source of flaws in my understanding, and factor that in to my thinking when it affects outcome.

You see, being a doctor isn't about attaining that highest performance status - it's about striving for it. "Primum non nocere", above all else, do no harm. Its a commitment to an iterated process of self reflection and improvement in service to the needs of others. The balance of plusses and minuses in the field of medicine will always be heavy on both sides. It's the opposite of a simple balance equation! However, if I keep this basic faith, it'll always be net positive for me.
"If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants." -Sir Isaac Newton

Armin Hanika 56PF

BellyDoc
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Re: Working in healthcare?

Post by BellyDoc » Wed Jan 31, 2018 6:53 am

Keith wrote:
Sat Nov 25, 2017 12:49 pm
I always wondered how folks wear latex gloves with nails or perform surgery with nails ? do health care workers not play classical guitar? do health care workers not use nails?
I'm a general surgeon with some specialization in advanced minimally invasive surgery. I am one-third of a busy 3-surgeon practice performing a combination of elective surgery - involving planned operations that can be scheduled in advance, and acute care surgery - involving emergency conditions treated by a much more rapid response, in a high risk/high demand community. I have been in practice for about 15 years. I have been studying classical guitar seriously for the last two years, and I use nails.

To clarify a point made in this thread about gloves, although it's true that latex-free gloves are available in all areas of healthcare, they are utilized far less in the operating room than in non-sterile environments. Latex remains the standard in the OR, is generally favored for it's performance characteristics, and is replaced with latex free alternatives mostly to deal with allergy. In the exam rooms and at the bedside, though, latex-free is used almost exclusively.

Glove violations naturally happen sometimes in the OR, and when they happen they're not a tragedy or an emergency. They're identified, the torn glove is replaced, and we move on. Sterile technique is not about insuring the absence of contamination sources, it's really about an initial minimization of septic sources followed by the constant removal or at least reduction of contamination throughout a procedure. Some areas of surgery are inherently less sterile than others. I do a lot of different types of gastro-intestinal surgery, for example, where perfect sterility is inherently impossible.

The most common reason for a glove violation has nothing to do with fingernails. It's just from handling instruments. My experience is that the violation is almost exclusively found in the tips of the fingers of my left hand glove as a result of something done with an instrument held in my right hand.

When I started to think about nails for guitar, I realized that I couldn't think of any times I'd violated a right hand glove, only lefts.

Now that I've had right hand nails for about 2 years, I can say that in an experience of over 1000 cases, I still haven't violated any right hand gloves, only lefts.

When I started experimenting with nails, I first grew what I thought would be "compromise" nails - something I could use, but without enough length to really be "guitar-optimized". Over the next year, my playing evolved, and with it, my use of nails. Interestingly, my optimized nail length has evolved to be even slightly LESS than what I previously thought of as a compromise. I really don't need much. I don't want more than I have.

My nails are shaped to give me some subtle ramps but you'd have to look closely to notice. I keep the edges smooth to the 12,000 grit level with micro mesh cloth. If you look closely, the edges actually reflect light. I clean under the free margins of the nails meticulously. I'm inspection-ready at all times.

Although my first concern with growing some nail length was to maintain a healthy respect for surgical safety, there were other areas of practice that turned out to be more affected.

For example, my physical exam technique changed. I now tend to favor the left hand.

Also, my presentation technique to patients/family members changed. I still talk and gesture, but now I pay attention to whether or not any eyes are tracking my right hand, as though the nails are causing them concern. I explain my nails in any situation where they appear to catch someone's eye. I've had nothing but positive feedback.

I have some teaching duties with students, and I explain the nails up front when I'm demonstrating suture techniques in class.
"If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants." -Sir Isaac Newton

Armin Hanika 56PF

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