Nice pieces that aren’t over in the blink of an eye!

Talk about things that are not necessarily related to music or the guitar.
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kloeten
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Re: Nice pieces that aren’t over in the blink of an eye!

Post by kloeten » Fri Feb 02, 2018 12:08 pm

i also had to fill an hour with music once and it is indeed striking how many pieces you need for this!
I second the suggestion for Un Dia de Noviembre.
Other Brouwer options would be Danza del Altiplano (close to 4 mins) and Cancion de Cuna (4 mins)

Smudger5150
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Re: Nice pieces that aren’t over in the blink of an eye!

Post by Smudger5150 » Fri Feb 02, 2018 12:59 pm

The other option is to play everything Larghissimo!!
:wink:

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Andrew Fryer
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Re: Nice pieces that aren’t over in the blink of an eye!

Post by Andrew Fryer » Fri Feb 02, 2018 1:21 pm

Sorry, but I can't help feeling very negative about this. Pieces for beginners will always be short because beginners don't have stamina.
smudger may have a point - I have noticed some propensity in people on YT to play things faster than necessary. Although I admit I am thinking mainly of Brouwer.
But even after I got grade 8 on the piano, I didn't expect to play for longer than 5 minutes on my own. The OP may be playing beginner to intermediate music, but what is his maximum ability? If beginner to intermediate, then I think he is biting off far more than he can chew - for a beginner to fill a 40-minute slot requires an audience of deaf relatives on drugs. As a beginner, I'd expect to die inside after 5 to 10 minutes, then still have another half-hour to fill.

As an advanced player, I might have been happy to revisit everything I'd ever played in public before. That might have filled 40 minutes.
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patsorenson
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Re: Nice pieces that aren’t over in the blink of an eye!

Post by patsorenson » Fri Feb 02, 2018 4:28 pm

Whiteagle wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 10:01 am
patsorenson wrote:
Thu Feb 01, 2018 7:58 pm
Another thing you could do, if you want to intersperse popular tunes into the mix, is take a couple of folk tunes in the same key and make a medley of them,- things like The Water is Wide, Be Thou my Vision, Wild Mountain Thyme, Amazing Grace, all in drop-D tuning key of D. You could play 3 or 4 tunes back to back, or take 2 and do an A-B-A form to stretch things out a bit.
I like this idea. Any suggestions about where I would find these arrangements. I have a nice wild mountain thyme arrangement but havent learnt it but would like to.
I don't have any particular sources for you at the moment, except I know there is a Scott Tennant arrangement of Wild Mountain Thyme, and Mark Hanson has done some fingerstyle arrangements of hymns,not really easy to play though. I typically do web searches for free or public domain scores, or any arrangements on guitar learning or sharing sites for either fingerstyle or classical, when I'm looking for songs.

My approach sometimes is to take the tune (which you can sometimes find on violin free learning sites as well), put it into a key that lies well and easy for guitar or is familiar to you aurally, (drop D seems to work well for a lot of these old celtic/scottish tunes),then figure out the chords, then just make a simple arrangement with the melody notes on a treble string along with a bass note from the chord (or the transition note to the next chord, if appropriate), and fill in between the melody notes with some arpeggios from the chord. You can repeat verses, starting maybe in first position and then moving up to 5th or 7th with inversion chords for the melody. Then you can add some touches like harmonics, or some interludes of different chord structure that might fit, to make it a bit more interesting. It makes for a simple arrangement, but the advantages of simple are 1) It allows you to really put emotion and expression into the playing; and more importantly, 2) if YOU create the arrangement from what you know and your experience, you know you can play it!

Hope that is helpful.

Pat
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robin loops
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Re: Nice pieces that aren’t over in the blink of an eye!

Post by robin loops » Fri Feb 02, 2018 5:57 pm

Another great book for filler pieces is The Guitar Music Of Spain - Bartolome Calatayud. It's full of simple classical arrangements of traditional Spanish music that go over very well with non classical audiences. Most pieces can be played well with one or two readings. Its also great for site reading practice (as none of the pieces present any major technical difficulties).
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robin loops
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Re: Nice pieces that aren’t over in the blink of an eye!

Post by robin loops » Fri Feb 02, 2018 6:02 pm

And if you're feeling really adveturous you can check out Rodrigo And Gabriella performing stairway to heaven (they also have arrangements of other contemporary music). It's basically a Spanish flamenquillo (pop flamenco style) version. It's a great thing to know when the drunk rocker says (after you play a concert masterpiece), "yeah duuuuude that's cool, but can you play Stairway?".
One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them.
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Re: Nice pieces that aren’t over in the blink of an eye!

Post by CathyCate » Fri Feb 02, 2018 6:12 pm

robin loops wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 5:57 pm
Another great book for filler pieces is The Guitar Music Of Spain - Bartolome Calatayud. It's full of simple classical arrangements of traditional Spanish music that go over very well with non classical audiences. Most pieces can be played well with one or two readings. Its also great for site reading practice (as none of the pieces present any major technical difficulties).
+1
These pieces are well received, and permit even the novice to raise the volume as well as step up the tempo if need be. The book is worth every penny for intermittent gig musicians. :chitarrista:
Cathy
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Whiteagle
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Re: Nice pieces that aren’t over in the blink of an eye!

Post by Whiteagle » Sat Feb 03, 2018 5:45 am

CathyCate wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 6:12 pm
robin loops wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 5:57 pm
Another great book for filler pieces is The Guitar Music Of Spain - Bartolome Calatayud. It's full of simple classical arrangements of traditional Spanish music that go over very well with non classical audiences. Most pieces can be played well with one or two readings. Its also great for site reading practice (as none of the pieces present any major technical difficulties).
+1
These pieces are well received, and permit even the novice to raise the volume as well as step up the tempo if need be. The book is worth every penny for intermittent gig musicians. :chitarrista:
Thanks. Having two recommendations has prompted me to buy it.

CathyCate
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Re: Nice pieces that aren’t over in the blink of an eye!

Post by CathyCate » Sat Feb 03, 2018 7:39 am

Whiteagle wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 5:45 am
CathyCate wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 6:12 pm
robin loops wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 5:57 pm
Another great book for filler pieces is The Guitar Music Of Spain - Bartolome Calatayud. It's full of simple classical arrangements of traditional Spanish music that go over very well with non classical audiences. Most pieces can be played well with one or two readings. Its also great for site reading practice (as none of the pieces present any major technical difficulties).
+1
These pieces are well received, and permit even the novice to raise the volume as well as step up the tempo if need be. The book is worth every penny for intermittent gig musicians. :chitarrista:
Thanks. Having two recommendations has prompted me to buy it.
You'll be so glad that you did. Good Luck to you! Do let us know how it all goes.
Cathy
Matthew Chaffin 2014 spruce/quilted maple
Andy Culpepper 2015 bear claw spruce/flamed maple

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joachim33
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Re: Nice pieces that aren’t over in the blink of an eye!

Post by joachim33 » Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:27 am

Andrew Fryer wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 1:21 pm
Sorry, but I can't help feeling very negative about this. Pieces for beginners will always be short because beginners don't have stamina.
smudger may have a point - I have noticed some propensity in people on YT to play things faster than necessary. Although I admit I am thinking mainly of Brouwer.
But even after I got grade 8 on the piano, I didn't expect to play for longer than 5 minutes on my own. The OP may be playing beginner to intermediate music, but what is his maximum ability? If beginner to intermediate, then I think he is biting off far more than he can chew - for a beginner to fill a 40-minute slot requires an audience of deaf relatives on drugs. As a beginner, I'd expect to die inside after 5 to 10 minutes, then still have another half-hour to fill.

As an advanced player, I might have been happy to revisit everything I'd ever played in public before. That might have filled 40 minutes.
Andrew

You are making good points, which I full heartedly support.

I learned the hard way - for a public rehearsal you can’t expect the best you managed to accomplish while practicing at home on a good day. It is prudent to assume an just ok day to have things not fall to pieces. It is discussed here at length that members feel they underperform when playing for their tutors during a lesson. That will hold more for a public display.

I think a question Whiteagle needs to ask himself, has he done 20 min and did that go well?

J.

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Re: Nice pieces that aren’t over in the blink of an eye!

Post by Whiteagle » Sat Feb 03, 2018 9:49 pm

joachim33 wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:27 am
Andrew Fryer wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 1:21 pm
Sorry, but I can't help feeling very negative about this. Pieces for beginners will always be short because beginners don't have stamina.
smudger may have a point - I have noticed some propensity in people on YT to play things faster than necessary. Although I admit I am thinking mainly of Brouwer.
But even after I got grade 8 on the piano, I didn't expect to play for longer than 5 minutes on my own. The OP may be playing beginner to intermediate music, but what is his maximum ability? If beginner to intermediate, then I think he is biting off far more than he can chew - for a beginner to fill a 40-minute slot requires an audience of deaf relatives on drugs. As a beginner, I'd expect to die inside after 5 to 10 minutes, then still have another half-hour to fill.

As an advanced player, I might have been happy to revisit everything I'd ever played in public before. That might have filled 40 minutes.
Andrew

You are making good points, which I full heartedly support.

I learned the hard way - for a public rehearsal you can’t expect the best you managed to accomplish while practicing at home on a good day. It is prudent to assume an just ok day to have things not fall to pieces. It is discussed here at length that members feel they underperform when playing for their tutors during a lesson. That will hold more for a public display.

I think a question Whiteagle needs to ask himself, has he done 20 min and did that go well?

J.
Hi

To answer your question, yes I have performed 40 minute sets before and it went well. What I am looking for is some pieces that are longer and also looking to include more variety. I am working on advanced repetoire but I am not ready or looking to perform it in a few weeks time.

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joachim33
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Re: Nice pieces that aren’t over in the blink of an eye!

Post by joachim33 » Sat Feb 03, 2018 10:12 pm

Sounds good to me. Best of luck for your performance.

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chuckinphoenix
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Re: Nice pieces that aren’t over in the blink of an eye!

Post by chuckinphoenix » Sun Feb 04, 2018 2:56 pm

I introduce each piece with a little history or interesting things I have found about about the composer or the piece. For instance Lagrima by Tarrega has has a nice talking point. Same with Barrios' Julia Florida. Also has the advantage for me that it 'slows' things down a bit and my stage fright isn't so bad.
If you ain't the lead dog the scenery never changes.

Whiteagle
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Re: Nice pieces that aren’t over in the blink of an eye!

Post by Whiteagle » Mon Feb 05, 2018 2:08 am

chuckinphoenix wrote:
Sun Feb 04, 2018 2:56 pm
I introduce each piece with a little history or interesting things I have found about about the composer or the piece. For instance Lagrima by Tarrega has has a nice talking point. Same with Barrios' Julia Florida. Also has the advantage for me that it 'slows' things down a bit and my stage fright isn't so bad.
Hi, i like this suggestion and i like to do this too although if the piece is very short i am wary of spending too much time talking and not enough time playing.

Whiteagle
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Re: Nice pieces that aren’t over in the blink of an eye!

Post by Whiteagle » Sun Feb 18, 2018 10:06 am

CathyCate wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 7:39 am
Whiteagle wrote:
Sat Feb 03, 2018 5:45 am
CathyCate wrote:
Fri Feb 02, 2018 6:12 pm


+1
These pieces are well received, and permit even the novice to raise the volume as well as step up the tempo if need be. The book is worth every penny for intermittent gig musicians. :chitarrista:
Thanks. Having two recommendations has prompted me to buy it.
You'll be so glad that you did. Good Luck to you! Do let us know how it all goes.
My performance was on today. Pretty happy with how it went. I didnt include many new pieces prefer to be working on them for longer before performing. I played some of the shorter pieces twice changing the dynamics on the repeat. The audience are unlikely to have heard the pieces before. I felt more comfortable on the classical pieces that some of the contemporary music i played whicch i dont practice much. Thanks again everyone for your suggestions.

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