The strings on my guitar sure need a lot of tuning

Choice of classical guitar strings and technical issues connected with their use.
mrcold

Post by mrcold » Mon Sep 25, 2006 2:17 pm

For CG I only use the classic tuning-fork. Tuning a CG is not like an electric guitar in my opinion. It´s a compromise. If I would use a tuner I could get all the strings to tune individually perfect, but it would still sound crap in a different key. (I guess this post belongs in another topic).
Actually, if you use a tuner (and your guitar's intonation is set as standard) then you are putting your guitar into even or equal temperment, so it will sound just as crappy no matter what key you are in. if you use a tuning fork for one string and then do the 5th fret unison mehtod of tuning your gutar, the results are the same(or at least very nearly) if you use a tuning for for one string and then use open strings and natural harmonics and getting rid of all of the beats between unisons, then you are putting it in more of a type of "well" temperment (term taken from piano tuning practices) in which it sounds more in tune to the ear, in some keys, and more out in others, but over all, any key is acceptable. SOME people that i have encountered use a tuning fork, or a tuner or whatever, and then for what ever song they are playing, go along and make little adjustments to help them out with whatever key they are playing in, so that for instance, a certain chord that is hit repetedly will be exactly in tune, however, other notes on the adjusted string might be out a little. This method has alot of potential, but you have to be really careful, or everything you play will sound like dirt, except that one chord, or whatever.

so there you go
Cody

Sasquatch51

Post by Sasquatch51 » Tue Sep 26, 2006 2:54 pm

mrcold wrote:
For CG I only use the classic tuning-fork. Tuning a CG is not like an electric guitar in my opinion. It´s a compromise. If I would use a tuner I could get all the strings to tune individually perfect, but it would still sound crap in a different key. (I guess this post belongs in another topic).
Actually, if you use a tuner (and your guitar's intonation is set as standard) then you are putting your guitar into even or equal temperment, so it will sound just as crappy no matter what key you are in. if you use a tuning fork for one string and then do the 5th fret unison mehtod of tuning your gutar, the results are the same(or at least very nearly) if you use a tuning for for one string and then use open strings and natural harmonics and getting rid of all of the beats between unisons, then you are putting it in more of a type of "well" temperment (term taken from piano tuning practices) in which it sounds more in tune to the ear, in some keys, and more out in others, but over all, any key is acceptable. SOME people that i have encountered use a tuning fork, or a tuner or whatever, and then for what ever song they are playing, go along and make little adjustments to help them out with whatever key they are playing in, so that for instance, a certain chord that is hit repetedly will be exactly in tune, however, other notes on the adjusted string might be out a little. This method has alot of potential, but you have to be really careful, or everything you play will sound like dirt, except that one chord, or whatever.

so there you go
Cody
That's exactly what I do. I tune up initially with an electronic tuner, then I "fine tune" for the predominant chord in the next piece I'm playing. It's not absolutely perfect all the time, but I don't think there's any way to get a Classical Guitar perfectly in tune at every fret on every string anyway.

Dpepe79

They sure do

Post by Dpepe79 » Wed Sep 27, 2006 1:18 pm

Make sure you tune them up then pull up on them a little then re-tune. If you are pulling (lightly) down near the bridge I like to put a little pressure on the bridge so I am just pulling the strings (again lightly)

They play on them a little and re-tune. The treble strings seem to take the longest for me. What I also do it when I am done I over tune them a little. Using a tuner instead of stopping in the middle I do to the three quarter mark. Use caution doing that. Mark sure the gears on your tuner are lubricated. All the tuning and friction from the tension can wear on them. Depending on the quality of the tuners you can snap off the peg or crack them. I use a couple of drops of bore oil on each before I start wrapping the new strings so the gears get to work in the oil over many revolutions.

Return to “Classical Guitar Strings”