Question on pull off technique

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SteveL123
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Question on pull off technique

Post by SteveL123 » Thu Dec 14, 2017 5:03 am

When playing pull offs, are you suppose to do the pull off as a rest stroke or is it ok to pull off as a free stroke? By rest stroke I mean the finger doing the pull off lands on the adjacent string. Free stroke the finger lands in mid air (the way I've always done it).

Here's a video of me practicing measures 11-12 BWV1001 where there's a few pull offs in 12. It took a bit of work when I was figuring out the fingerings. Can you tell me if I'm doing anything wrong? What do I need to do to improve it?


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Stephen Kenyon
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Re: Question on pull off technique

Post by Stephen Kenyon » Thu Dec 14, 2017 7:55 am

Depending on context, be able to use both techniques; but like RH tirando, the 'free' version is the one you must have.
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Larry McDonald
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Re: Question on pull off technique

Post by Larry McDonald » Thu Dec 14, 2017 4:09 pm

Hi,
I use the "rest-stroke" pull-off as a teaching aid, but rarely use it in performance. As Maestro Kenyon writes, you must have the "tirando" (free-stroke) type.

-All the best,
Lare
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escasou
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Re: Question on pull off technique

Post by escasou » Sun Mar 11, 2018 6:14 pm

SteveL123 wrote:
Thu Dec 14, 2017 5:03 am

Here's a video of me practicing measures 11-12 BWV1001 where there's a few pull offs in 12. It took a bit of work when I was figuring out the fingerings. Can you tell me if I'm doing anything wrong? What do I need to do to improve it?
Hi. A good way to improve passages with slurs is playing without them. Try also to check if you use too many slurs, sometimes we use too many slurs with the risk of increasing the tension more than necessary. Regards.

daveto
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Re: Question on pull off technique

Post by daveto » Wed Mar 14, 2018 4:41 pm

escasou wrote:
Sun Mar 11, 2018 6:14 pm
Hi. A good way to improve passages with slurs is playing without them. Try also to check if you use too many slurs, sometimes we use too many slurs with the risk of increasing the tension more than necessary. Regards.
I don't quite understand what you mean here. I am currently working through some Brouwer studies with slurs (ie, Etude XVII, Pour les ornements). Are you suggesting that I play the piece without using the slurs? If so, how would this improve my slurs?

If you can clarify, I'd appreciate it - thanks.

guit-box
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Re: Question on pull off technique

Post by guit-box » Sun Mar 18, 2018 11:06 pm

It's more important that the joints move correctly than whether or not the finger tip rests on the adjacent string. That can be a useful guide but it's more important that the main knuckle joint (MCP) extends while the other two joints flexion. This is also true for free strokes. A good pull-off is the same as a good free stroke. You can see this very clearly in this excellent left hand pull-off tutorial

An eyewitness will often only see what he already believes to be true.

guit-box
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Re: Question on pull off technique

Post by guit-box » Sun Mar 18, 2018 11:14 pm

SteveL123 wrote:
Thu Dec 14, 2017 5:03 am
When playing pull offs, are you suppose to do the pull off as a rest stroke or is it ok to pull off as a free stroke? By rest stroke I mean the finger doing the pull off lands on the adjacent string. Free stroke the finger lands in mid air (the way I've always done it).

Here's a video of me practicing measures 11-12 BWV1001 where there's a few pull offs in 12. It took a bit of work when I was figuring out the fingerings. Can you tell me if I'm doing anything wrong? What do I need to do to improve it?

Steve, I believe your hand position is too far behind the neck. You will be in a better position to do a good pull-off if you bring more of your palm out in in front of the fretboard. For me, the palm-reading lines of my hand are about even with the edge of the frets and that is my mid-range default hand position. Of course, there's no such thing as a single static hand position, and don't trust me, look at the left hand position of multiple pros and verify what I'm saying is legit.
An eyewitness will often only see what he already believes to be true.

escasou
Posts: 65
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2018 10:30 am

Re: Question on pull off technique

Post by escasou » Tue Mar 20, 2018 6:59 am

daveto wrote:
Wed Mar 14, 2018 4:41 pm
escasou wrote:
Sun Mar 11, 2018 6:14 pm
Hi. A good way to improve passages with slurs is playing without them. Try also to check if you use too many slurs, sometimes we use too many slurs with the risk of increasing the tension more than necessary. Regards.
I don't quite understand what you mean here. I am currently working through some Brouwer studies with slurs (ie, Etude XVII, Pour les ornements). Are you suggesting that I play the piece without using the slurs? If so, how would this improve my slurs?

If you can clarify, I'd appreciate it - thanks.
Hi. When playing with slurs you must control your movements and strength and, in some way, playing without them (not always, of course, only as one more resource of your study) it could help you to be more conscious about this aspects. Regards.

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