Can you help? What does this notation symbol mean?

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rice33
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Can you help? What does this notation symbol mean?

Post by rice33 » Wed Jan 17, 2018 10:16 pm

Hello All

I've been searching for a while but no luck so far. Can anyone tell me what the x inside the notehead means? It's from Trinity grade 2.

Any help Much appreciated!
Thanks
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George Crocket
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Re: Can you help? What does this notation symbol mean?

Post by George Crocket » Wed Jan 17, 2018 10:30 pm

The answer is written above - "tambora" which signifies percussing the notes, usually by striking near or at the bridge with the thumb or the side of the hand. The chord is fingered as indicated.
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JohnB
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Re: Can you help? What does this notation symbol mean?

Post by JohnB » Wed Jan 17, 2018 10:33 pm

I think the clue is in the instruction "tambora".
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rice33
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Re: Can you help? What does this notation symbol mean?

Post by rice33 » Wed Jan 17, 2018 10:58 pm

Great thanks guys. As there were two instructions I was thinking they were two different things. Is it common for this to happen? Wouldn't just one or the other be sufficient?

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Stephen Kenyon
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Re: Can you help? What does this notation symbol mean?

Post by Stephen Kenyon » Wed Jan 17, 2018 11:00 pm

True, you can write normal notes and add 'tambora' - the percussion notehead alone might be interpreted different ways if the definition was not there, though the defined pitches tends to give it away.
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rice33
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Re: Can you help? What does this notation symbol mean?

Post by rice33 » Wed Jan 17, 2018 11:07 pm

Thanks Stephen, good to know I'm not completely off the mark!

Peter Corey
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Re: Can you help? What does this notation symbol mean?

Post by Peter Corey » Wed Jan 17, 2018 11:55 pm

rice33 wrote:
Wed Jan 17, 2018 10:58 pm
Great thanks guys. As there were two instructions I was thinking they were two different things. Is it common for this to happen? Wouldn't just one or the other be sufficient?
Yes, I think the notation is redundant (thus, possibly confusing). Usually, the chord is notated normally, and the word "tambora" or "percussion" written above or below. A well-known example is the opening of Fandanguillo by Joaquin Turina. See score here:

http://wayback-01.kb.dk/wayback/2010102 ... BS1073.pdf

Todd Tipton
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Re: Can you help? What does this notation symbol mean?

Post by Todd Tipton » Thu Jan 18, 2018 12:58 am

If you want to try to get a good tambora, here is a great way to practice it:

1. Instead of plucking the strings, hit the strings with the side of your thumb. The entire arm may be used. Make sure that your hand bounces off of the string. You don't want to mute the strings. This is similar to hitting a snare drum, and letting the "note" ring.

2. Hit the bridge in exactly the same manner. Make it sound as full, well-rounded, and musical as possible.

3. Finally, with your ears, search for that sweet spot somewhere in between 1. and 2. yet far closer to 2. You are trying to get the best of both worlds. You want to hear the notes from the strings, but you also want to hear the percussive thud from the bridge. At this point, year ear may be far more reliable than visual reference. The tiniest of hand movement will significantly alter the sound.

As always,

Happy Practicing!
Dr. Todd Tipton, classical guitarist
Cincinnati, OH, USA (available via Skype)

rice33
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Re: Can you help? What does this notation symbol mean?

Post by rice33 » Thu Jan 18, 2018 12:29 pm

Excellent. Thanks everyone.

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