Ostinato guitar

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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konstantine
Posts: 84
Joined: Mon Oct 03, 2016 7:08 pm
Location: Berlin

Ostinato guitar

Post by konstantine » Sun Jun 24, 2018 5:54 pm

The last couple of years I've been exploring the persistent nature of ostinato and its uses especially in one of the upper voices; charmed by the the illusion of static-movement that it employs, I started developing exercises and etudes to help me deal with the technical requirements and difficulties.

This is part 1 of a series of videos that I'm planning to do on the subject on the future.

Thanks for watching and please let me know what do you think.

Konstantine


DeeKay
Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Jul 09, 2018 9:03 am
Location: Heidelberg, Germany

Re: Ostinato guitar

Post by DeeKay » Thu Jul 19, 2018 6:39 pm

Very interesting. Looking forward to the next part...

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Christopher Langley
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 419
Joined: Sun Jan 21, 2018 6:59 pm
Location: Marthasville, Missouri

Re: Ostinato guitar

Post by Christopher Langley » Thu Jul 19, 2018 7:17 pm

To me, this feels very similar to how folk fingerstyle guitar is approached, with set finger-picking "patterns". Very natural idea to me, since folk fingerstyle is something I learned in the past.

Thanks for the video. Helped me to combine the two worlds of folk fingerstyle and classical!

P.S. Subscribed to your youtube buddy :)

P.P.S. I thought the "uneven" example actually sounded pretty cool/different/interesting. It could certainly be used creatively :) I might even steal it buddy.
How strange it is to be anything at all.

konstantine
Posts: 84
Joined: Mon Oct 03, 2016 7:08 pm
Location: Berlin

Re: Ostinato guitar

Post by konstantine » Sun Jul 29, 2018 8:22 am

Christopher Langley wrote:
Thu Jul 19, 2018 7:17 pm
To me, this feels very similar to how folk fingerstyle guitar is approached, with set finger-picking "patterns". Very natural idea to me, since folk fingerstyle is something I learned in the past.

Thanks for the video. Helped me to combine the two worlds of folk fingerstyle and classical!

P.S. Subscribed to your youtube buddy :)

P.P.S. I thought the "uneven" example actually sounded pretty cool/different/interesting. It could certainly be used creatively :) I might even steal it buddy.
Thank you Christopher, I appreciate the sub and the comment.

Combining classical and folk (among other things) is definitely one of my pursuits.

Konstantine

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