Improve your Fingerboard Knowledge and Sight-Reading Technique

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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Fretful
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Re: Improve your Fingerboard Knowledge and Sight-Reading Technique

Post by Fretful » Sat Apr 13, 2019 10:47 am

In lieu of a small parenthesis, a superficial analysis of the minor scales is in order (see Preface on Public Space).

Further examples and exercises in minor Thirds:

To familiarize further with the sound of the minor Third, listen to the opening phrase of Scarlatti’s Sonata K.213:
Scarlatti - K.213 (opening phrase).jpg
Detect and play the minor Thirds in the opening phrase of Segovia’s Remembranza:
minor Third - Remembranza - Segovia.jpg
The minor Third played linearly (on the same string) and as chords:

Strictly adhere to the chosen strings which determine the fingering patterns to be absorbed:
minor THIRD - Linearly & as Chords.jpg
Next: Studies in Thirds by Aguado (revised)
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Fretful
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Re: Improve your Fingerboard Knowledge and Sight-Reading Technique

Post by Fretful » Sat Apr 20, 2019 10:45 am

THIRDS – Aguado” revised:

Before you tackle this, you may want to revise the various patterns for both Major and minor Thirds.

This study in Thirds, by Aguado, is presented here with each line, at first, reproduced as published; then the same line is introduced in higher positions where the territory will seem unfamiliar and unsettling but very rewarding for those who persevere:
THIRDS - Major & minor - Aguado.jpg
Next: THIRDS - Major & minor - in C Major – GIULIANI:
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Fretful
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Re: Improve your Fingerboard Knowledge and Sight-Reading Technique

Post by Fretful » Sat Apr 27, 2019 10:33 am

THIRDS - Major & minor - in C Major – GIULIANI:

This Giuliani study, as was Aguado’s in the last set, is presented differently from the original publications where it is offered almost entirely in low positions. Here, you are once again at the “high end”, the deep end, out of your comfort zone.

So as to minimize Left Hand movement, resorting to open strings, or linear fingerings as described at the end of the last set but one (i.e. playing the minor third on the same string) are very useful techniques in order to reach notes which would otherwise not be available in the given positions without stretching.

Also, finger leaps across adjacent strings (mostly with finger 4) avoid position changes.
Notice as well that whatever position the hand is in, there is little difference in finger configurations (except, of course, where string ② is involved [always remember that semitone discrepancy!])

(The right hand fingerings in bar 9 are for reference only, being just one solution regarding the possibilities of position-shifting).

Closely observe the fingerings and string denominations given in bar 1, and in the transition between bars 4 and 5; use them as templates for deciphering the rest of the study and for deciding between playing the thirds linearly or across strings.
THIRDS - M & m - Giuliani.jpg
Having played the exercise in the given positions, reverse them and explore (see Preface to “Mixed Thirds (Major & minor)” on Public Space.

Next: Pinning the B flat to the board
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Fretful
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Re: Improve your Fingerboard Knowledge and Sight-Reading Technique

Post by Fretful » Sat May 04, 2019 11:22 am

Pinning the B flat to the board (also see Preface to “Pinning the B flat to the Board” on Public Space).

REVISITING THE F MAJOR SCALE:
F Major Scale - Necessity for B flat rather than A sharp.jpg
As you see, in order to observe the successive “tone – tone – semitone – tone – tone – tone – semitone”, the gap of a whole tone between the “A” and the “B” needs to be narrowed to a semitone; this could be achieved by sharpening the “A”, but then the scale would have two A’s! … so, flattening the B avoids this hiatus and restores the correct “note-names succession” of the notes within the scale, a useful discipline which becomes an imperative when dealing with Harmony.

For the next study, no need here to suggest positions; let them be your own, resulting from logic and dictated by the fact that each line must be played on one particular string only.

The asterisks above the B flats are not there to tell the guitarist that those notes are indeed B flats but to suggest that the player should concentrate on the nature of the note as well as its POSITION on the fingerboard in relation to the STRING on which it is being played.

Work on this until you can unhesitatingly designate the B flats on any given string (very little work is involved, as each string only has ONE B flat worth considering, except for ⑤ which has two):
PINNING B flat - to the Board - relating to Open Strings.jpg
Pinning the B flat to the board - Exercise.jpg
Next: Pinning the B flat – J.S. Bach – Presto from Sonata 1- page 1
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Tea Toradze
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Re: Improve your Fingerboard Knowledge and Sight-Reading Technique

Post by Tea Toradze » Sun May 05, 2019 3:09 pm

Thank you so much for sharing this

Fretful
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Re: Improve your Fingerboard Knowledge and Sight-Reading Technique

Post by Fretful » Sat May 11, 2019 10:35 am

(Also see “Preface to Pinning B Flat” on Public Space).

“Pinning B flat to the Board” - J.S. Bach - Presto - Sonata No1 – page 1”

The “Position Lines” are now largely dispensed with.

Using the given positions only as guides, use as few position changes as possible.

Where a note is marked with an asterisk, keep the LH at the given position but stretch - depending on the indication, and only by one fret - either finger 4 in a “stretch-up” (*4), or finger 1 in a “stretch down” (*1) for the notes which would otherwise not be available with the “four fingers/four frets” formation:
PINNING B flat - Presto - Sonata 1 - J.S. Bach - page 1.jpg
Next: J.S. Bach – Presto – page 2
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Fretful
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Re: Improve your Fingerboard Knowledge and Sight-Reading Technique

Post by Fretful » Sat May 18, 2019 10:47 am

J.S. Bach – Presto – page 2:

Remember that where a note is marked with an asterisk, keep the LH at the chosen position but stretch, depending on the indication, and only by one fret, either finger 4 in a “stretch-up” (*4), or finger 1 in a “stretch down” (*1).

The bracketed (V) of Bar 16 suggests that this would be a good point to return to position V for reading practice and “note-knowledge purposes, but V requires a lot of finger 4 leaping across the strings; this can be avoided by using a barré (or three fingers simultaneously) but, before deciding, bear in mind that that would defeat the linear learning of the notes in those positions.

At Position I, barrés avoid cross-strings finger leaps and do not defeat the learning aim.

If you decide to stay at I where “(V)” is indicated, do return to Position V at “*V”:
PINNING B flat - Presto - Sonata 1 - J.S. Bach - page 2.jpg
Next: Pinning the E flat to the Board
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Fretful
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Re: Improve your Fingerboard Knowledge and Sight-Reading Technique

Post by Fretful » Sat May 25, 2019 11:00 am

PINNING E flat TO THE BOARD:

Choose your own positions for each string; use as many different positions as you like BUT constantly bear in mind that, for each individual E flat, a change of position will mean having to use a different finger; therefore, be particularly conscious of what position you have chosen and which finger is required as a consequence of that position; the asterisks illustrate the notes which require a “stretch up” with finger 4 without changing position:
PINNING E flat to the Board.jpg
PINNING E flat TO THE BOARD – Exercise:
You will have noticed that, as the course progresses, more and more decisions are left to your discretion; however, for learning purposes, do stick to the designated strings (see PREFACE TO “PINNING E flat TO THE BOARD” on Public Space):
PINNING E flat to the board - Exercise.jpg
Next: Pinning the A flat to the Board
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Fretful
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Re: Improve your Fingerboard Knowledge and Sight-Reading Technique

Post by Fretful » Sat Jun 01, 2019 11:00 am

(See “PREFACE TO “PINNING A flat (and D Flat en passant) TO THE BOARD” on Public Space)

Pinning the A flat (and D Flat en passant) to the Board:
Pinning A flat and D flat to the Board - Relating to each string - Pos. III & VIII.jpg
Reading exercise recapitulating B flat and E flat at Positions III, IV, and V:
Gigue (G minor) - Robert de Visée.jpg
“FLATS – Blocks Of” – In the last five bars, analyze the consecutive barrés (CI - CIII – CVIII) and observe the “platforms” they offer; there are only three, so memorizing them should not be too much of a problem.

Change Position only where indicated:
Flats - Blocks of.jpg
Next: THIRDS with Flats - Aguado
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Fretful
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Re: Improve your Fingerboard Knowledge and Sight-Reading Technique

Post by Fretful » Sat Jun 08, 2019 10:47 am

THIRDS with Flats - Aguado:
(see Preface to “THIRDS with Flats – Aguado” on Public Space)

Treat the following “THIRDS - Aguado - FLATS” only as exercises since the given positions were not chosen pragmatically but for their challenging aspect as well as for finding chords which are identical but found in different places.

As previously, each line is shown first as published, then with variations of positionings and no fingerings:
THIRDS - Aguado - flats.jpg
Next: the Major Sixth
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Fretful
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Re: Improve your Fingerboard Knowledge and Sight-Reading Technique

Post by Fretful » Sat Jun 15, 2019 10:39 am

THE MAJOR SIXTH :

The Major Sixth, containing NINE semitones, is considered to be a “dynamic” interval, thrusting a melody forward to very nearly the top of the scale.
Familiarize with its sound, as well as its shape on the stave, with a particularly “famous” Major Sixth:
MAJOR SIXTH - Bach - Gavotte en Rondeau.jpg
As a chord, it requires an uncomfortable stretch if played on adjacent strings, but becomes particularly easy if played with one of its notes being open, or if fingered on ⑥ and ④, ⑤ and ③, ④ and ②, ③ and ①, as in the following patterns:
MAJOR SIXTHS - Adj. and non-adj. strings.jpg
MAJOR SIXTHS with Open Strings:
MAJOR SIXTHS - with Open Strings.jpg
MAJOR SIXTHS (Exercise):
Positions here are mostly left up to the player BUT rigorously respect the given string choices; also, bear in mind the MANY available permutations as illustrated in the following example where Bar 7 can be fingered in many different ways (and there are more!) :
MAJOR SIXTHS - Exercise - BAR 7.jpg
:
MAJOR SIXTHS - Exercise.jpg
Going back to the example given above for BAR 7, replay “MAJOR Sixths (Exercise)" creating as many fingering-permutations as you can think of whilst always TRYING to be conscious of what position you are at and what strings you are using and, meanwhile, always LISTENING to the sound of the MAJOR SIXTH.

Next : the minor SIXTH:
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