Learning smaller movements

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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szurcio
Posts: 17
Joined: Tue Nov 13, 2018 3:23 am
Location: Alabama, USA

Learning smaller movements

Post by szurcio » Sat Dec 22, 2018 1:04 am

I recently discovered what the reason for some of my right-hand problems is: the extended stroke of my "m" finger. I tend to raise it up too much before attacking the string (kind of crooking the finger: moving it more with the joint in the middle of the finger instead of the one that is closer to fingernails) and that movement disturbs the balance of my other fingers (especially "a") in arpeggios and faster passages. I think I have to learn how to strike a string down (press it down like piano keys) instead of plucking it from the outside. Of course, the problem disappears when I plant my fingers and play arpeggios from that position but how can I gradually transfer that limited movement to my free strokes? Should I keep the 3 fingers close together above the strings (as if still "planted" in the air) to learn to play with smaller, more efficient strokes? Any ideas how to unlearn this extended/outside movement?

Desperado
Posts: 200
Joined: Tue May 03, 2016 5:23 pm

Re: Learning smaller movements

Post by Desperado » Sat Dec 22, 2018 5:38 pm

I sometimes practise arpeggios with Pima planted on the strings so only one finger moves at a time. If you play staccato you'll keep movements small and the hand well balanced.

szurcio
Posts: 17
Joined: Tue Nov 13, 2018 3:23 am
Location: Alabama, USA

Re: Learning smaller movements

Post by szurcio » Thu Jan 31, 2019 5:51 am

I just scheduled a couple of online classes with Douglas Niedt - I need someone to have a look at my problems.

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Sebastian
Posts: 85
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2019 6:41 pm
Location: Argentina

Re: Learning smaller movements

Post by Sebastian » Sat Feb 02, 2019 7:27 pm

szurcio wrote:
Sat Dec 22, 2018 1:04 am
I recently discovered what the reason for some of my right-hand problems is: the extended stroke of my "m" finger. I tend to raise it up too much before attacking the string (kind of crooking the finger: moving it more with the joint in the middle of the finger instead of the one that is closer to fingernails) and that movement disturbs the balance of my other fingers (especially "a") in arpeggios and faster passages. I think I have to learn how to strike a string down (press it down like piano keys) instead of plucking it from the outside. Of course, the problem disappears when I plant my fingers and play arpeggios from that position but how can I gradually transfer that limited movement to my free strokes? Should I keep the 3 fingers close together above the strings (as if still "planted" in the air) to learn to play with smaller, more efficient strokes? Any ideas how to unlearn this extended/outside movement?
Do you implement sequential planting in your study? Not only planting, but I mean the "quick-prep" technique. Creating a "staccatissimo"
This is aimed at increasing accuracy and speed, mostly at preparing. If you don't implement this study technique, do it with arpeggios from either Carlevaro 2, Giuliani's 120, arpeggios and small right hand formulas derivated from pieces or just invent your own drills.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oKfnq5sRjT8

If you do implement this technique in your study and still you don't see any improvement (weird) then maybe consider mantaining your i m a fingers close at all moments... "feel the heat between the heat", said one professor.

We would have to see your hands either way to a better diagnosis, cheers
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