Why do we finger shifts/slides in such a weird way?

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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Luis_Br
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Re: Why do we finger shifts/slides in such a weird way?

Post by Luis_Br » Wed Mar 27, 2019 11:27 pm

I don't think it is weird. IMO a jump always generate some problem of continuity. A small jump might be easier to achieve a smaller cut. But which is worse, two small cuts or only one cut a bit bigger?

Depends on the musical result, but generally it is easier to find a place for one smart jump rather than several smaller ones.
Nonetheless a 4 fret jump shouldn't generate a cut worse than a 2 fret, I think. It just needs practice.

Technically I agree guide finger is an important tool. I use it always, even when finger is not playing the note before. You can use finger 1 as guide finger behind finger 3. Keep it down while pressing finger 3 and slide finger 1 to fret 4 like a guide finger. It seems mr Delcamp also try to do it. On wound strings I would just very slightly touch string to avoid noise during the shift.
I think the video example is not well played at all, maybe he just picked up the guitar and read through the example to show it. RH sound consistency is by far worse than the jump cut.

I don't think practicing scales is good to develop shifting either. To me the best exercise to develop hand shifting is to practice...
... hand shifting. If I have a problem shifting in a scale, instead of practicing 5 min of scales, I would practice probably 4 min of shifts and 1 min of scales just to check if the shift has improved.
I would recommend Carlevaro book 3, which is made of pure hand shifting/positioning exercises, both horizontal, vertical and rotational. To me the most valuable book of exercises for LH. When you play shifts you must have a very stable LH and a keen perception for the positioning or it will be a disaster. So developing good hand positioning through shifting is a very important basic skill.

celestemcc
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Re: Why do we finger shifts/slides in such a weird way?

Post by celestemcc » Thu Mar 28, 2019 2:43 pm

I think the video example is not well played at all, maybe he just picked up the guitar and read through the example to show it. RH sound consistency is by far worse than the jump cut.
Do you mean the OP's video? Or the clip of Marcin Dyalla?
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Wuuthrad
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Re: Why do we finger shifts/slides in such a weird way?

Post by Wuuthrad » Thu Apr 04, 2019 4:39 am

Mark Clifton-Gaultier wrote:
Wed Mar 27, 2019 2:58 pm
Wuuthrad wrote:I don't think portamento is even possible on a fretted instrument ...
You're correct Wuuthrad, strictly speaking it isn't possible in the manner of a singer or violinist by our current definition - nonetheless, that's exactly the technique that instrumentalists came to emulate, thus the term does stand up in describing music of a certain period ... and beyond sometimes - Segovia, for one, used to say portamento when he meant to convey "slide".

Words are annoyingly capricious - it's why I underlined carrying in my reply. You probably already know that portamento means carrying in Italian, but not in the same sense that an analyst of Tárrega's technique would use it (as I did) in describing the arm/hand/finger mechanism.

8 early years of Violin study have imprinted upon my mind the idea that Musical Language was very precise, and that the definitions of these words was not be altered, because they formed the foundation of musical creation where artistic expression would then hopefully flourish.

Like the foundations of a grand sculpture or piece of architecture, they have to be precise and accurate otherwise the whole thing might not work at all.

Taking liberties with the "Musical Dictionary" so to speak (which is how I perceive what Segovia did in this example,) has never been something I could easily absorb, and thanks for your explanation.
"Pay no attention to what the critics say. A statue has never been erected in honor of a critic." -Jean Sibelius

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