Sor, and loving it

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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Sohail288

Re: Sor, and loving it

Post by Sohail288 » Tue Dec 23, 2008 9:24 am

I have Sor's 60 short pieces from, hmm, the publishing company escapes me, but i guess sophecles (sp?) did all of the fingering, and their really fun to play, i use the first volume to sight read and the second one has some crazy pieces in it. Overall, yeah i love Sor, and his music.

PM

Re: Sor, and loving it

Post by PM » Sun Feb 01, 2009 4:00 am

I just discovered Opus 31 #23.

I don't have it well enough to mp3 but give it a try. It is really smooth calm beautiful piece.

mjbindy

Re: Sor, and loving it

Post by mjbindy » Sun Feb 01, 2009 1:07 pm

I would like to see a Delcamp - Sor recording project; with everyone taking a shot at a piece (or two). It's probably impossible to organize the recordings in a single post.

I'll record Opus 1 and Opus 2 - 6 Divermenti. I'm about one month (give or take) away from playing Opus 2 as repertoire.

cheers
Matt

Sean

Re: Sor, and loving it

Post by Sean » Sun Feb 01, 2009 3:15 pm

Hey Matt,

Your CD has inspired me to pull out Gran Solo once again. I haven't played anything not 20th century in over a decade.

Inky960

Re: Sor, and loving it

Post by Inky960 » Mon Feb 02, 2009 7:55 am

:contrat: Speaking of Sor, I'm working on his "Minuet in C," as presented in the Frederick Noad book, Solo Guitar Playing, Volume One.

Since we seem to have a score or Sor experts here, could somebody tell me the tempo of this piece? Noad makes no mention at all of tempo that I can see.

By the way, I haven't been playing classical guitar very long and desperately need a better instrument than the one I have. I've been considering buying an Alverez Yairi (sp?), but even that (about $1200) is pushing my budget limits. Any suggestions for finding a good guitar - used is fine! - online? I live in the middle of nowhere, and there are no good guitar shops nearby.

Thank you fine people!

Inky

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Martin
Posts: 430
Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2005 7:18 pm
Location: Wales, UK

Re: Sor, and loving it

Post by Martin » Mon Feb 02, 2009 11:39 am

Inky960 wrote::contrat: Speaking of Sor, I'm working on his "Minuet in C," as presented in the Frederick Noad book, Solo Guitar Playing, Volume One.

Since we seem to have a score or Sor experts here, could somebody tell me the tempo of this piece? Noad makes no mention at all of tempo that I can see.

Inky
I really like that piece. Its actually the 4th movement of Sor's "Deuxieme Grande Sonata Opus25". Classical period minuets were usually played quite fast, around 132 - 160 bpm, and as its the finale of a major work I think it should sound a bit dramatic. Aim for that sort of range, but without losing the quality of "gracefulness" that characterises so much of Sor.

Martin
If all else fails, try reading the instructions...

mjbindy

Re: Sor, and loving it

Post by mjbindy » Mon Feb 02, 2009 11:58 am

Sean - Gran Solo is my FAV Sor work! Good luck; POST IT. I'd enjoy hearing your interpretation.
Sean wrote:Your CD has inspired me to pull out Gran Solo once again. I haven't played anything not 20th century in over a decade.

inimeany

Re: Sor, and loving it

Post by inimeany » Mon Feb 02, 2009 2:27 pm

Hi I am new here on this site.
Can anyone tell me where to start with Fernando Sor?
I only play classical guitar for a few years and people tell that Sor is so difficult. I got some books and printed downloads but don't know where to start.
I played some Sor Etudes and yes they are quite difficult but o so beautiful. I love the way three voices sound at the same time.

PM

Re: Sor, and loving it

Post by PM » Mon Feb 02, 2009 2:33 pm

Opus 60 #'s 6,7,8,9,10, 12, 13, 22

mjbindy

Re: Sor, and loving it

Post by mjbindy » Mon Feb 02, 2009 2:48 pm

inimeany wrote: Can anyone tell me where to start with Fernando Sor?
.
You've certainly come to the right place for that question! Be prepared for a multitude of responses. I believe though, the answer is up to you and your technical comfort levels....

I'm starting at Opus 1 and moving up... I'm studying Opus 2 and really enjoying it.. I believe Opus 3 is theme and variations and then, the Fantasy Opus 4 which is often recorded (Bream Ed is excellent). I imagine another couple weeks on the Opus 2. At least a couple weeks on Opus 3 and perhaps a lifetime on Opus 4. Heck, I'll be retired before I get to Opus 9!

(Actually, I have been skipping around a bit too and looking into the Etudes as well. )


Cheers

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Sobers
Posts: 413
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Location: Kolkata (Calcutta), India

Re: Sor, and loving it

Post by Sobers » Tue Feb 03, 2009 12:04 pm

inimeany wrote:Can anyone tell me where to start with Fernando Sor?
In my opinion buy this book Complete Sor Studies and go according to it.
The book has 3 levels comprising Beginner - Intermediate - Advanced ...... having two Opus for each level.

http://www.melbay.com/product.asp?ProductID=95110

All the best

Sobers

guff

Re: Sor, and loving it

Post by guff » Wed Feb 04, 2009 12:47 pm

Opus 35 and Opus 31 are good places to start. They were written intended for use by beginners, though Sor's idea of a beginner was pretty twisted! The early lessons in each (1-4 or so) are rudimentary, but quite pleasant / beautiful. Difficulty goes up from there, but it's clear to see the different techniques he's introducing along the way.

Cuyler

Re: Sor, and loving it

Post by Cuyler » Sun Apr 12, 2009 3:11 am

almost a year ago, PM wrote:Awesome composer and probably an awsome guitarist himself, but writer?????
I checked a copy of his Method for Spanish Guitar from the libraray. Mercy!!!
It is like a technical manual written by some engineering geek (not that there's anything wrong with that).
Agreed -- as an example, here is how he describes "the manner of setting the strings in vibration":
in public domain version from [url=http://www.crgrecordings.com/scores.htm]Lawrence Johnson's site[/url], Sor wrote:A stretched string in quitting the straight line, towards which it is strongly impelled by its tension, if that agent ceases to prevent it, will fly towards it with an impetuosity which will carry it beyond the line in the opposite side; and this deviation will, in its turn, produce a similar effect, this alternation continuing in proportion to the difference between the force of impulsion received, and its tendency to repose.
Yikes! :kap: I hope the original Spanish version is easier to read. The French/German translation even includes mathematical equations with square roots. Classical guitar is a science!

Later on in the method, Sor compiles a list of rules for fingerings. Are these still useful for today's guitars?

I have only been playing for three months and found that Opus 60 no.s 1 and 2 are not too difficult and fun to play. I love Julian Bream's rendition of Opus 35 no. 22 (Etude in B Minor), but it is well beyond my capabilities.

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mverive
Posts: 519
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Location: Houghton, MI

Re: Sor, and loving it

Post by mverive » Mon Apr 13, 2009 3:07 am

PM wrote:Opus 60 No. 6 and Opus 60 No. 10 are pretty easy and fun to play. These are two of the many that I practice sight reading with. Just delightful little tunes that make me happy.
I agree completely! I'm a Sor-aholic, and have virtually everything he ever wrote (thanks to a Tecla collection). Opus 60 numbers 6 and 10 are beautiful pieces, and I play them at almost every practice session.

I have heard so many CG'ers play Opus 35 numbers 17 and 22, that I'm getting tired of hearing them. Yes, they're beautiful pieces, but Sor has so much to offer that I'd love to hear some of the less well-known pieces (I think there's a bit of ego involved in being able to play the "Segovia 20", but there are many other Sor pieces that seem to have been ignored). Opus 35, number 9 is another great example. Based on a simple descending A major scale, and not too technically demanding for an intermediate player, it's another piece that is a delightful tune that might make you happy.

Mike
"(P)Lay on, MacDuff, And damn'd be him that first cries, 'Hold, enough!'"

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mverive
Posts: 519
Joined: Thu Feb 08, 2007 2:55 am
Location: Houghton, MI

Re: Sor, and loving it

Post by mverive » Mon Apr 13, 2009 3:11 am

inimeany wrote:
(Actually, I have been skipping around a bit too and looking into the Etudes as well. )


Cheers
Actually, the Sor Opi were not written in order (Opus 1 was NOT his first Opus), so I'm not sure that you're really skipping around that much. Most of the Opus numbers were added long after the works were originally written.

Mike
"(P)Lay on, MacDuff, And damn'd be him that first cries, 'Hold, enough!'"

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