Can electric guitar technique hamper my classical technique?

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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2handband
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Re: Can electric guitar technique hamper my classical technique?

Post by 2handband » Mon Feb 20, 2017 3:45 pm

I don't think it's a detriment at all. Right now I am doing a two-month stint with a Deep Purple/Rainbow tribute while their regular guitar player recovers from surgery (which is why I've been kinda scarce here lately). I'm going out and doing those shows and then sitting down with my classical and it's a pretty seamless transition. The only issue is that I'm playing stuff Ritchie Blackmore was on and trying to keep it as real as I can and he did a bunch of stuff with his fingers. I find with nails on an electric I have to hold my hand at kind of a funny angle to fingerpick. That is however a minor problem and one that wasn't hard to solve.

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Re: Can electric guitar technique hamper my classical technique?

Post by RectifiedGTRz » Wed Mar 29, 2017 3:52 pm

i regularly play electric guitar: rock, metal, etc. I also also play bass, rock keyboards, banjo and also was classically trained to play classical.

Neither hampers the other. In fact I would say I was able to pick up banjo so quickly due to playing so many RH exercises on classical!

Don't let anyone tell you you can't do all types of music because it hampers the other.

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robin loops
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Re: Can electric guitar technique hamper my classical technique?

Post by robin loops » Wed Mar 29, 2017 7:12 pm

RectifiedGTRz wrote:i regularly play electric guitar: rock, metal, etc. I also also play bass, rock keyboards, banjo and also was classically trained to play classical.

Neither hampers the other. In fact I would say I was able to pick up banjo so quickly due to playing so many RH exercises on classical!

Don't let anyone tell you you can't do all types of music because it hampers the other.
I completely agree. I can't figure out why some consider 'classical guitarist' and 'musician' to be mutually exclusive.
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Simon the Pieman
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Re: Can electric guitar technique hamper my classical technique?

Post by Simon the Pieman » Mon Apr 10, 2017 1:19 pm

I play both and also steel string acoustic. I suppose if you were playing mainly electric, then coming back to classical, you would find the neck width and string spacing on a classical difficult to get used to. But other than that, the main difference is in the right hand. Personally, I find that my classical right hand technique helps with my electric/acoustic plectrum technique - but NOT the other way round ! So I overemphasise practicing classical at the expense of steel string plectrum. It works for me. Whatever way round you do it, your left hand is always getting a good work out - and if you play a lot of legato on electric, this can strengthen your fingers and stretch them in a way which is not so common on classical. Just watch out for tapping technique - easy to damage right hand nails.

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Steve Kutzer
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Re: Can electric guitar technique hamper my classical technique?

Post by Steve Kutzer » Mon Apr 10, 2017 1:47 pm

I play a bit of steel string acoustic and fingerstyle Jazz chord melody on an archtop with flatwound stings. The archtop is physically the easiest guitar I have played, and flatwounds are similar in feel to nylon.

But I have limited time, and so I usually play 90% of one for 3 months or so, and the usual winner is classical. Steel strings are a little rough on the RH nails and the LH callouses can be a bit of a bother when going back to nylon. But other than that, I see no problem. Developing chord melody arrangements has made me concentrate more on theory and has thus made me a better overall musician. And it's nice to have freedom, rather than playing a score note for note.
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fast eddie
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Re: Can electric guitar technique hamper my classical technique?

Post by fast eddie » Wed Nov 01, 2017 4:59 am

I do not play electric guitar, but in watching a BBC film about John Williams, a segment included his time with the rock group Sky during the 1980's. At this time he sometimes played an electric guitar, which was shown on the film. John said his classical guitar technique did not transfer to the electric. In the film a bass player in the group said that John was obviously out of his comfort zone on the electric, but praised his musical skills. John himself said in the film that at the time he was voted in a magazine to be one of the best electric guitarist during this time. He said that this was totally absurd that he probably should not be in the top 1,000. I found that interesting.
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Re: Can electric guitar technique hamper my classical technique?

Post by ronjazz » Mon Dec 04, 2017 9:29 pm

From another angle, having been a pro studio player for much or my career, I have found that classical guitar technique n general can really improve one's electric guitar, banjo, mandolin and electric bass playing simply because of the demands classical music makes.
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Re: Can electric guitar technique hamper my classical technique?

Post by PeteJ » Wed Dec 06, 2017 2:23 pm

I find the only problem is the right hand, which has to be flat for electric. After so much time having the extra expressiveness of damping in this way I feel the CG is a bit out of control unless I have the back of my hand ready to damp strings. So much so I shaved off my thumbnail in order to be able to flatten my hand. Not recommended but for my intermediate playing I like this hybrid electric/classical hand-position.

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Re: Can electric guitar technique hamper my classical technique?

Post by poc600 » Thu Dec 28, 2017 1:17 pm

I bought a cheap electric guitar. Played around with it for a few months every day and when I came back to my classical guitar I found my classical playing had improved. Don't know why but it had.

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Re: Can electric guitar technique hamper my classical technique?

Post by AndreiKrylov » Thu Dec 28, 2017 2:17 pm

haunting_nylon wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2012 2:00 pm
I am a very serious classical guitar student who is currently doing grade 6 / 7 studies and preparing for studying Classical Guitar from an University in Germany. I had my first music lesson on an acoustic steel string guitar around 7 years back. The reason which had made me pursue the guitar at that point was simply the wish to play classic rock solos, Blues etc. which I would eventually be playing on the electric. For the last couple of months I've been only focusing on classical and have been planning to sell my electric, which i can play very well. But recently my electric guitar brought back memories, I had actually played my first blues scales on it, improvised, jammed with other musicians and enjoyed it. Since my classical guitar teachers here are against the idea of playing electric guitar, I get no encouragement to play. I am fully aware about the technical differences between classical and electric, for example - the thumb of the left hand for the classical guitar has to be at the back of the neck resting behind the 2nd finger ( which can change ) but cannot come up and grab the neck or appear above the neck which is used in electric guitar string bending technique or in jazz technique. Also in classical left hand technique the fingertips have to fret the strings in a more horizontal manner along with the different position of the knuckles and the wrist as opposed to playing electric in a rather angular manner. In terms of Right hand technique and tone-production both are almost poles apart from each other. But if Classical Guitar is my top priority, then is it OK to play electric for an hour a day when i practice the classical for 4-6 hours a day ? Can it hamper my classical technique even if I'm careful ?

I think Professional musicians who have /had to play both classical guitar and electric guitar to make a living can answer my question very well. :)

I am personally very comfortable with my Rg series Ibanez electric and string bending is a technique that I don't want to forget and it's also something that you cannot incorporate in classical guitar ( I know some classical virtuosos do it, but seriously do they sound anything like Stevie ray Vaughan :mrgreen: ??? lol )

For the left hand technique on the electric guitar I am doing it almost the same as my classical but at times placing the thumb slightly above the neck when i am bending the string. For the right hand I am using a pick, as steel strings can affect the quality of my polished nails. So what do you think, Can I still be a perfectionist on the Classical Guitar without having to completely quit the electric ?
I played both all my life. See no correlation for myself whatsoever.
Even opposite - it enhanced my possibilities, since I started to use both Technics and more in both guitars.
except bending on nylon.. does not really work...
But!
1.I played electric with fingers, did not used pick,
Used my fingernail as a pick from time to time.
2. After a while I started to play mostly electric/midi guitar with nylon strings too

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