Kohno & - Sakurai Guitar Fan Club, Delcamp branch

Construction and repair of Classical Guitar and related instruments
User avatar
musguitar
Posts: 72
Joined: Fri May 12, 2017 6:39 am

Re: Kohno & - Sakurai Guitar Fan Club, Delcamp branch

Post by musguitar » Wed Nov 21, 2018 12:12 pm

rinneby wrote:
Wed Nov 21, 2018 6:28 am
musguitar wrote:
Wed Nov 21, 2018 5:53 am
rinneby wrote:
Fri Aug 24, 2018 11:34 am
Right now I have my eyes on a Masaru Kono No.7 from 1964. Solid spruce top and solid Brazilian rosewood back and sides. I will know more next week :) A friend of mine who's selling.
Image

/Jon

It's not superior, but has a slightly different tone color, than let say Indian rosewood. A more "ringing/sining tone" some would say. However, I'm not too sure about that. My Kono No.7 has a pretty dark and woody sound. Then again, we all "know" that the construction of the guitar and mostly the construction of the top contributes to the sound the most. Today Brazilian rosewood is banned (since 1992) and it's rare to find good woods, such as this. For this reason, as well as the apparent ascetics, the price for a nice set of Brazilian rosewood is expensive and (for some luthiers and players) sought after.

/Jon
Here is a link to a 1965 Kono with Brazilian back and sides, a year apart to your newly acquired 1964 Kono. Darker Braz RW than your 1964. Probably from the same batch of Brazilian rw Masaru used during that period. Here is the link to my flick acct. (1st 3 photos): https://www.flickr.com/photos/23522420@N06/?

User avatar
musguitar
Posts: 72
Joined: Fri May 12, 2017 6:39 am

Re: Kohno & - Sakurai Guitar Fan Club, Delcamp branch

Post by musguitar » Wed Nov 21, 2018 12:18 pm

BTW Jon, i uploaded your photo of 1964 for reference. thanks.

User avatar
rinneby
Posts: 1670
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2016 9:52 am
Location: Sweden

Re: Kohno & - Sakurai Guitar Fan Club, Delcamp branch

Post by rinneby » Wed Nov 21, 2018 2:00 pm

musguitar wrote:
Wed Nov 21, 2018 12:18 pm
BTW Jon, i uploaded your photo of 1964 for reference. thanks.
No problem. That No.10 - 1965 looks very nice. It's mostly likely the exact same model as my No.7 but one year later.

Is it yours?
/Jon
Feel free to ask me anything about Japanese classical guitars.

User avatar
musguitar
Posts: 72
Joined: Fri May 12, 2017 6:39 am

Re: Kohno & - Sakurai Guitar Fan Club, Delcamp branch

Post by musguitar » Wed Nov 21, 2018 11:14 pm

rinneby wrote:
Wed Nov 21, 2018 2:00 pm
musguitar wrote:
Wed Nov 21, 2018 12:18 pm
BTW Jon, i uploaded your photo of 1964 for reference. thanks.
No problem. That No.10 - 1965 looks very nice. It's mostly likely the exact same model as my No.7 but one year later.

Is it yours?
/Jon
Am thinking of buying it but it has structural concerns-- the top has been repaired due to 2-cracks. This guitar formerly owned by former delcamp member here named 'Petersen2'. Selling price is $1100.

User avatar
rinneby
Posts: 1670
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2016 9:52 am
Location: Sweden

Re: Kohno & - Sakurai Guitar Fan Club, Delcamp branch

Post by rinneby » Thu Nov 22, 2018 4:09 am

musguitar wrote:
Wed Nov 21, 2018 11:14 pm
rinneby wrote:
Wed Nov 21, 2018 2:00 pm
musguitar wrote:
Wed Nov 21, 2018 12:18 pm
BTW Jon, i uploaded your photo of 1964 for reference. thanks.
No problem. That No.10 - 1965 looks very nice. It's mostly likely the exact same model as my No.7 but one year later.

Is it yours?
/Jon
Am thinking of buying it but it has structural concerns-- the top has been repaired due to 2-cracks. This guitar formerly owned by former delcamp member here named 'Petersen2'. Selling price is $1100.
I haven't seen the top, but it sounds extremely cheap for such guitar, Normal price is at least 3000-4000 dollars.
/Jon
Feel free to ask me anything about Japanese classical guitars.

tonechaser
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2019 6:18 pm

Re: Kohno & - Sakurai Guitar Fan Club, Delcamp branch

Post by tonechaser » Sun Feb 03, 2019 4:56 pm

I have a chip in the back of the neck on my cashew-finished 1964 Kono. It's located such that it actually interferes with playing and I really need to drop-fill. I can use shellac, nitro, super-glue, poly or any other material available in Texas... but I have no access to cashew. Which available material would be the best option for the drop-fill? Thanks.
1964 Masaru Kono No. 3
1964 José Oribe
1985 R. E. Bruné
2009 Kristopher Barnett

Petter
Posts: 59
Joined: Sat Jun 23, 2018 4:12 pm
Location: Sweden

Re: Kohno & - Sakurai Guitar Fan Club, Delcamp branch

Post by Petter » Sun Feb 03, 2019 9:21 pm

I am hopefully looking to join the fan club very soon!

Today I won the auction for a mint looking short scale '65 Kohno!

Mostly because of the praise the '64-'68 Kohnos have been getting here.

Link to the auction: https://zenmarket.jp/auction.aspx?itemCode=k364752870
Last edited by Petter on Sun Feb 03, 2019 9:37 pm, edited 2 times in total.
1961 Masaru Kono No. 519
1962 Rokutaro Nakade A4
1965 Masaru Kohno No. 4
1976 Sakazo Nakade No. 2000

astro64
Posts: 1179
Joined: Sat Aug 06, 2016 7:43 pm
Location: American Southwest

Re: Kohno & - Sakurai Guitar Fan Club, Delcamp branch

Post by astro64 » Sun Feb 03, 2019 9:26 pm

The label has 1965 as the date? Anyway, it looks identical on the outside to my 1964 No 4. I'd be curious to know if the inside bracing pattern has 7 fans and then two short fans near the middle that only reach partway up. If so, you have a good one. If not, it might still be a good one ;)

Petter
Posts: 59
Joined: Sat Jun 23, 2018 4:12 pm
Location: Sweden

Re: Kohno & - Sakurai Guitar Fan Club, Delcamp branch

Post by Petter » Sun Feb 03, 2019 9:36 pm

Oops! It's '65 of course ;)

I'll post pics from the inside when I get it and a short review!

Yep, hoping it's a really good one!
1961 Masaru Kono No. 519
1962 Rokutaro Nakade A4
1965 Masaru Kohno No. 4
1976 Sakazo Nakade No. 2000

macnylonguitar
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2019 2:51 am

Re: Kohno & - Sakurai Guitar Fan Club, Delcamp branch

Post by macnylonguitar » Tue Feb 05, 2019 8:39 pm

Hello, fellow Kohno & Sakurai Fan Club, Delcamp branch... I was not sure if there was some separate thread, etc.. This is what I found...Just introduced myself yesterday....and I have a nice Kohno / Sakurai story as part of that... so I will put it here..not sure if this is the right place for it....but here it goes...

Greetings, John K here...

I have been playing 46 years, have a Bachelor's of Music degree in jazz and classical guitar from Western Connecticut State University, 1987

Professionally, I have been an Apple systems engineer for many many years, having worked at Apple HQ in 2001-2003, iTunes 1.0... Trust me all things guitar, and especially nylon guitar are by a wide margin, far more fun and interesting.

It wasn't until after 5 plus years after I graduated in 1987 that I was introduced to the likes of fingerstyle guitar, steel string players initially, then nlyon: Preston Reed, Chris Proctor, Pierre Bensusan, and solo Earl Klugh.

I took a class with John Knowles (Chet Atkins’ good friend) and asked him about right hand tone and technique, and he said Chet told him (and others) "find a teacher that will teach you that, without necessarily having to swear an allegiance to any particular musical genre". I ventured out, and found Ben Verdery at Yale in New Haven, CT, and took no more than two lessons...got my nails and tone majorly improved, and on my way.

Since I started guitar when I was 8, I had right away been drawn to the sound of the nylon guitar, and the first piece I Iearned (by ear, no transcription) was "Mood For a Day" by Steve Howe (Yes). Thumb and index only...(make it harder on myself). Later, I got much more efficient right hand fingerings..

Even after being influenced by countless guitarists of so many genres: some of which were: Steve Howe, Paco de Lucia, Al Di Meola, Wes Montgomery, Allan Holdsworth, etc., I then heard Earl Klugh's Solo Guitar album, and was stunned and mezmorized.. no overdubs..

What I found out later is, even though Earl has some stellar arrangements, he is not limited to arrangements... he can and will truly "improvise" chordal / fingerstyle pieces, like a Bill Evans on piano.

His knowledge of the fret board harmony, and diving into voicings, George Van Epps, etc, helped him to get that mastery.

To this day, Earl is one of my favorites in his approach, with his right hand technique, tone, harmony / substitutions. I never realized the guitar could do this, or a nylon guitar could sound this full and beautiful on "jazz" tunes.

I also play electric: jazz and fusion, and am having a headless guitar built for me by luthier Rich Chaffins in West Virginia, sort of Strandberg influence, the idea of being an electric jazz guitar (chambered walnut), doing Ed Bickert, Ted Greene, Pat Martino type stuff, but also some fusion: a la Holdsworth, Darryl Gabel,etc..

I myself have been diving into fretboard harmony and studying it, I'd say systematically for the last 7-10 years, and I have some made some great breakthroughs, to sort of simplify / organize it.

Instead of just memorizing frets / finger positions, and maybe having no idea of the chord(s) (harmonic function), that one is playing, say in one voicing, that same chord shape can and will have 5 different names / functions. I am in the process of putting together some YouTube videos on this..and then consequential material / lessons to help get a more unifying understanding of fretboard harmony..

I also have had the nylon guitar bug for over 25 years now. Have had several hi end luthier nylons and steels: Kenny Hill, Jose Oribe, Larrivee, 1999 Taylor 912c (Chris Proctor), etc.

The last year or so I have been actively hunting for that next guitar. For me that means a lot of listening and most importantly, playing.

But getting access to, and playing hi end guitars of this nature and caliper, as many of you here know, is not necessarily easy..

On the web, I have been listening to some guitars that spoke to me: Manuel Adalid, Douglass Pringle, Tim McCoy..but one has to actually play the guitar, no substitute.

I just went to GSI here in Santa Monica and lined up about 7 guitars, $5K-$6500k range, and now I have realized after these many years, that's what the price range is for that caliper level of guitar.

I played a guitar that shocked me: not just the huge volume / resonance, but the ease of the left hand in fingering, the action was shockingly low for a nylon / "classical", and can go way lower (and with normal tension strings), the neck profile was shallow depth, I am thinking 21 mm or so (with carbon fiber strips)...to get huge volume required not really a great amount of right hand power:

A 2018 cedar Sakurai / Kohno, Professional J.

This guitar blew me away, how easy it is to play. The trebles / upper trebles are solid (stiff, not flabby, nor too hard to fret) in left hand feel and tone / volume. I never heard / experienced this in another nylon I have ever played before.

The fretboard stunned me.. what feels like a radius, perhaps 20", and perhaps stainless steel (shinny) frets. I thought I was playing just a wider version (51-52 mm) of say a Kiesel HH2 fretboard. I could do all my left hand legato runs, and that is just not possible with high action.

The basses are huge, and also shocking were the middle strings, 4,3,2. They were cutting thru and popping out. On prior nylons, those strings / notes, especially in the 5th fret and up areas, are practically dead sounding and muffled.

I believe there is a Kohno / Sakurai Fan Club here (thread?), please I want to sign up. My next nylon guitar, for sure, will be this guitar. My search is over... Cedar or spruce? Always been a spruce fan, but cedar was great on this guitar...

When I took that class with John Knowles in the early 1990's in Connecticut, what was John playing, a Kohno, makes too much sense to me now. Look forward to this site and thanks so much... john

Bryan Pannell
Posts: 41
Joined: Sat Jul 28, 2018 12:26 pm

Re: Kohno & - Sakurai Guitar Fan Club, Delcamp branch

Post by Bryan Pannell » Thu Feb 07, 2019 3:33 am

Can someone post an example of the early 1960’s
Kohno numbering system ?

oc chuck
Posts: 535
Joined: Sat Oct 03, 2009 5:43 pm
Location: orange county, ca.

Re: Kohno & - Sakurai Guitar Fan Club, Delcamp branch

Post by oc chuck » Thu Feb 07, 2019 5:14 am

From the Kohno web site:

From around 1963 to 1982, we used numbers for our models.
The model numbers also indicated their retail prices in Japan.
No.15 was sold at JPY150,000 in Japan, but we cannot estimate the current value of your guitar.

User avatar
rinneby
Posts: 1670
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2016 9:52 am
Location: Sweden

Re: Kohno & - Sakurai Guitar Fan Club, Delcamp branch

Post by rinneby » Thu Feb 07, 2019 7:49 am

macnylonguitar wrote:
Tue Feb 05, 2019 8:39 pm
Hello, fellow Kohno & Sakurai Fan Club, Delcamp branch... I was not sure if there was some separate thread, etc.. This is what I found...Just introduced myself yesterday....and I have a nice Kohno / Sakurai story as part of that... so I will put it here..not sure if this is the right place for it....but here it goes...

Greetings, John K here...

I have been playing 46 years, have a Bachelor's of Music degree in jazz and classical guitar from Western Connecticut State University, 1987

Professionally, I have been an Apple systems engineer for many many years, having worked at Apple HQ in 2001-2003, iTunes 1.0... Trust me all things guitar, and especially nylon guitar are by a wide margin, far more fun and interesting.

It wasn't until after 5 plus years after I graduated in 1987 that I was introduced to the likes of fingerstyle guitar, steel string players initially, then nlyon: Preston Reed, Chris Proctor, Pierre Bensusan, and solo Earl Klugh.

I took a class with John Knowles (Chet Atkins’ good friend) and asked him about right hand tone and technique, and he said Chet told him (and others) "find a teacher that will teach you that, without necessarily having to swear an allegiance to any particular musical genre". I ventured out, and found Ben Verdery at Yale in New Haven, CT, and took no more than two lessons...got my nails and tone majorly improved, and on my way.

Since I started guitar when I was 8, I had right away been drawn to the sound of the nylon guitar, and the first piece I Iearned (by ear, no transcription) was "Mood For a Day" by Steve Howe (Yes). Thumb and index only...(make it harder on myself). Later, I got much more efficient right hand fingerings..

Even after being influenced by countless guitarists of so many genres: some of which were: Steve Howe, Paco de Lucia, Al Di Meola, Wes Montgomery, Allan Holdsworth, etc., I then heard Earl Klugh's Solo Guitar album, and was stunned and mezmorized.. no overdubs..

What I found out later is, even though Earl has some stellar arrangements, he is not limited to arrangements... he can and will truly "improvise" chordal / fingerstyle pieces, like a Bill Evans on piano.

His knowledge of the fret board harmony, and diving into voicings, George Van Epps, etc, helped him to get that mastery.

To this day, Earl is one of my favorites in his approach, with his right hand technique, tone, harmony / substitutions. I never realized the guitar could do this, or a nylon guitar could sound this full and beautiful on "jazz" tunes.

I also play electric: jazz and fusion, and am having a headless guitar built for me by luthier Rich Chaffins in West Virginia, sort of Strandberg influence, the idea of being an electric jazz guitar (chambered walnut), doing Ed Bickert, Ted Greene, Pat Martino type stuff, but also some fusion: a la Holdsworth, Darryl Gabel,etc..

I myself have been diving into fretboard harmony and studying it, I'd say systematically for the last 7-10 years, and I have some made some great breakthroughs, to sort of simplify / organize it.

Instead of just memorizing frets / finger positions, and maybe having no idea of the chord(s) (harmonic function), that one is playing, say in one voicing, that same chord shape can and will have 5 different names / functions. I am in the process of putting together some YouTube videos on this..and then consequential material / lessons to help get a more unifying understanding of fretboard harmony..

I also have had the nylon guitar bug for over 25 years now. Have had several hi end luthier nylons and steels: Kenny Hill, Jose Oribe, Larrivee, 1999 Taylor 912c (Chris Proctor), etc.

The last year or so I have been actively hunting for that next guitar. For me that means a lot of listening and most importantly, playing.

But getting access to, and playing hi end guitars of this nature and caliper, as many of you here know, is not necessarily easy..

On the web, I have been listening to some guitars that spoke to me: Manuel Adalid, Douglass Pringle, Tim McCoy..but one has to actually play the guitar, no substitute.

I just went to GSI here in Santa Monica and lined up about 7 guitars, $5K-$6500k range, and now I have realized after these many years, that's what the price range is for that caliper level of guitar.

I played a guitar that shocked me: not just the huge volume / resonance, but the ease of the left hand in fingering, the action was shockingly low for a nylon / "classical", and can go way lower (and with normal tension strings), the neck profile was shallow depth, I am thinking 21 mm or so (with carbon fiber strips)...to get huge volume required not really a great amount of right hand power:

A 2018 cedar Sakurai / Kohno, Professional J.

This guitar blew me away, how easy it is to play. The trebles / upper trebles are solid (stiff, not flabby, nor too hard to fret) in left hand feel and tone / volume. I never heard / experienced this in another nylon I have ever played before.

The fretboard stunned me.. what feels like a radius, perhaps 20", and perhaps stainless steel (shinny) frets. I thought I was playing just a wider version (51-52 mm) of say a Kiesel HH2 fretboard. I could do all my left hand legato runs, and that is just not possible with high action.

The basses are huge, and also shocking were the middle strings, 4,3,2. They were cutting thru and popping out. On prior nylons, those strings / notes, especially in the 5th fret and up areas, are practically dead sounding and muffled.

I believe there is a Kohno / Sakurai Fan Club here (thread?), please I want to sign up. My next nylon guitar, for sure, will be this guitar. My search is over... Cedar or spruce? Always been a spruce fan, but cedar was great on this guitar...

When I took that class with John Knowles in the early 1990's in Connecticut, what was John playing, a Kohno, makes too much sense to me now. Look forward to this site and thanks so much... john
This is a great story John and most welcome to the club. Let us know how things turn out.

All the best from Sweden
/Jon
Feel free to ask me anything about Japanese classical guitars.

es335
Posts: 1664
Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2007 2:12 pm
Location: Germany

Re: Kohno & - Sakurai Guitar Fan Club, Delcamp branch

Post by es335 » Thu Feb 07, 2019 10:11 am

Hi macnylonguitar, welcome to the club! Nice story indeed which reminds me of my „hunt“ 13 years ago, where a Sakurai/Kohno Pro-JS blew ME away. Same great feelings about playability and sound though mine has a spruce top. :D

tonechaser
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2019 6:18 pm

Re: Kohno & - Sakurai Guitar Fan Club, Delcamp branch

Post by tonechaser » Sat Feb 09, 2019 12:08 am

Here's the bracing pattern on my 1964 Kono No. 3. The illumination could be better but it's sufficient to show what is essentially 5 main braces with 2 additional "bones" coming off the central brace behind the bridge (the outside treble brace is barely visible but it's there). I've seen references to Ko[h]no's "fishbone" and "chicken foot" bracing from the early 1960's but I never really understood what that meant. I guess it means this. I love the tone of the instrument and I never felt the need to determine its bracing pattern but yesterday a flashlight ended up in the same room at the same time I was changing strings and...voilà. I thought the group would find it interesting and it might spark some interesting comments. Anybody seen this before or aware of any other luthiers using something similar? Masaru Kono was a deliberate craftsman; any thoughts on the science behind what he was shooting for with this bracing?
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
1964 Masaru Kono No. 3
1964 José Oribe
1985 R. E. Bruné
2009 Kristopher Barnett

Return to “Luthiers”