Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

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BugDog
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by BugDog » Wed Feb 06, 2019 6:35 pm

Jorge, Listened to your -3 v1 and I'm jealous of your recording and tone. Good results for the time spent. I agree with powderedtoastman for the most part. It's so easy to play those dotted 1/8th/1\16th combinations as 1/8th notes. Oddly you played it well where I have such a problem, that is at bars 11 and 12 (bars 3 and 4 of the 2nd section). That transition from the C to the G is tough to do, keeping with the proper timing and making it sound smooth and unhurried.

The afore mentioned 2nd section ornament is not marked as four 1/16th notes on my copy, but as a three 1/32th note ornament. I've got two ways of playing it. One way is as a stand alone ornament, sort of like a mordent, and similarly to your way, that is as 1/16th notes and timing it so that it ends rhythmically with the second beat.

Tempo wise I'm aiming at the middle of larghetto, about 63 bpm. It drags a bit to my ears at slower tempos.
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by Jorge Oliveira » Thu Feb 07, 2019 5:59 pm

BugDog wrote:
Wed Feb 06, 2019 6:35 pm
Jorge, Listened to your -3 v1 and I'm jealous of your recording and tone. Good results for the time spent. I agree with powderedtoastman for the most part. It's so easy to play those dotted 1/8th/1\16th combinations as 1/8th notes. Oddly you played it well where I have such a problem, that is at bars 11 and 12 (bars 3 and 4 of the 2nd section). That transition from the C to the G is tough to do, keeping with the proper timing and making it sound smooth and unhurried.

The afore mentioned 2nd section ornament is not marked as four 1/16th notes on my copy, but as a three 1/32th note ornament. I've got two ways of playing it. One way is as a stand alone ornament, sort of like a mordent, and similarly to your way, that is as 1/16th notes and timing it so that it ends rhythmically with the second beat.

Tempo wise I'm aiming at the middle of larghetto, about 63 bpm. It drags a bit to my ears at slower tempos.
Thank you, BugDog, for listening and commenting my rendition of the #3. It is a tough piece, indeed. I find it quite difficult the LH fingering in the transition of C Major in m.9 to G Major in m.10. As for the transition of A# Major to in m.11 to F Major in m.12, it is not that difficult. During the whole of m.11, in A# Major, I prepare in advance the F Major of m.12 by establishing a barré on the 1st fret covering the six strings and with my fingers 4, 3 and 2 pressing the first three stings in the 3rd fret.

Sor's Opus 35 #3 m.11.png

When the time comes to move into m.12, I just pluck the 3rd string (the last 16th note of m.11) and slide my finger 2 immediately to fret 2, lifting at the same time finger 4 and 3, and play the first chord of m.12, an F Major, as indicated in the picture following

Sor's Opus 35 #3 m.12, b.1.png

I then dismantle the barré,

Sor's Opus 35 #3 m.12, b.2-3.png

and proceed from there. I hope this helps you.

As for the ornament, I'll treat it as four consecutive and fast 16th notes. I still have to decide whether I'l do it only in the first string or in the 1st and 2nd string as well.

Finally, I wish you all the best with your #3 and I hope you post it in this thread as well.
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1972 - Kuniharu Nobe #8, 658/52, Spr, IN RW, Tokyo, JP
1976 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.50, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
1979 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.40, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
2014 - Hermanos Camps Master Nº 3, 650/52, CA Ced, MG RW, Banyoles, ES

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Alexander Kalil
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by Alexander Kalil » Thu Feb 07, 2019 10:08 pm

Jorge, I just listened to your rendition of N°3, this time using professional headphones. There is indeed no distortion, so the problem must have been my laptop loudspeakers. Sorry for the trouble.

Regarding your interpretation of the piece, my only issue is with the ornament in mm 19. This is a common inverted gruppetto to be executed usually with single a slur on the top string. Why are you making it too difficult for yourself?!

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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by Jorge Oliveira » Fri Feb 08, 2019 1:19 pm

Alexander Kalil wrote:
Thu Feb 07, 2019 10:08 pm
Jorge, I just listened to your rendition of N°3, this time using professional headphones. There is indeed no distortion, so the problem must have been my laptop loudspeakers. Sorry for the trouble.
No trouble at all, Alexander, I'm happy I could help :).
Regarding your interpretation of the piece, my only issue is with the ornament in mm 19. This is a common inverted gruppetto to be executed usually with single a slur on the top string. Why are you making it too difficult for yourself?!
Gosh, it's my musical ignorance plaguing me again… :oops: I had already come across the word gruppetto - there is indeed a prelude composed by Francisco Tárrega commonly know as Los gruppettos which I used to play in the past, rather wrongly, I can see it now - but I was not aware that the term
  • refers to an ornament, also known as a turn,
  • has a particular structure,
  • that in a piano score it is represented as a laid down S but that in a guitar score all notes are represented and, most importantly,
  • "Although written before the principal note, the turn begins squarely on the beat and is played very quickly, taking a minimum amount of time from the principal note. When all notes are played on one string the turn is customarily executed with a rapid continuous slur. However, in concluding the figure with a slur, a serious problem often arises concerning adequate volume and sustaining power of the principal note. This, of course, depends upon the tempo of the composition and the time value of the principal note."..."In such instances, the final note of the figure may be sounded with a finger of the right hand…" [Classic Guitar Technique: Supplement 1: Slur, Ornament, and Reach Development Exercises, page 28, by Aaron Shearer]
In conclusion, my advice on point b. of my post of February 5th, whereby I advised people not to play this #3 too fast as
  • "If you play it too fast, then you will be in trouble in the 16th notes of mrs.19-20 (in the edition at Delcamp's archive, these notes are even faster, 32nd notes). In fact, in most of the videos I've seen of this piece, most of the times the player resorts to introducing slurs or other ornaments to disguise the fact that they simply cannot pluck the four 16th notes separately."
I can see it now, does not make sense at all and I apologise for having, eventually, induced others in error :oops:. Moreover, I was, indeed, making it unnecessarily hard for myself too... :D

Back to practice, then, if it is just a slur, I know I can do it... :D

Edited to include the word hard in the penultimate phrase.
Last edited by Jorge Oliveira on Mon Feb 11, 2019 11:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
1972 - Kuniharu Nobe #8, 658/52, Spr, IN RW, Tokyo, JP
1976 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.50, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
1979 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.40, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
2014 - Hermanos Camps Master Nº 3, 650/52, CA Ced, MG RW, Banyoles, ES

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BugDog
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by BugDog » Fri Feb 08, 2019 10:22 pm

That's pretty similar to how I approach it. Think we might be counting bars differently. What you're calling m.11 and m.12, I seem to be calling m.13 and m.14.

I'm trying to get something presentable put together to post. I should probably know this but I'm wondering where and how to post for this particular thread. The current ones are attached to the post as *.wma or they're dropboxes or youtubes. Due to bandwidth (dial up) dropbox and youtube don't work for me. I'm not sure I have what I need to convert to .WMA or forum rules concerning that type of post.
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by Jorge Oliveira » Sat Feb 09, 2019 1:07 am

BugDog wrote:
Fri Feb 08, 2019 10:22 pm
That's pretty similar to how I approach it. Think we might be counting bars differently. What you're calling m.11 and m.12, I seem to be calling m.13 and m.14.

I'm trying to get something presentable put together to post. I should probably know this but I'm wondering where and how to post for this particular thread. The current ones are attached to the post as *.wma or they're dropboxes or youtubes. Due to bandwidth (dial up) dropbox and youtube don't work for me. I'm not sure I have what I need to convert to .WMA or forum rules concerning that type of post.
I use the Chanterelle edition of Sor's studies and in this edition the measures (or bars) are accounted for in the beginning of each staff. The following picture shows two staffs of the #3 score in this edition where you can see to which measures I'm referring to in my e-mail.

Sor Opus 35 #3, bars 5-14.png

As for posting a rendition of yours, the simple way is to produce and audio file, which can be of:
  1. type .wma, the only type accepted by the software of the Forum - it cannot exceed a certain size (the #3 .wma file I posted is 660 KB, the maximum size should be specified somewhere en the Forum data - , or
  2. type .mp3 which should be stored in your Dropbox or similar on-line storage.
A .wma file can be uploaded from your PC via the button Attachments below the text box (when you are editing in Full Editor & Preview mode), and placed then in line anywhere in your text. As for the .mp3 files, you should first copy the Dropbox link of your file and use the URL tool of the editor (looks like a chain with two rings). Put the mouse pointer where you wnat to put the file in your text,click the URL tool, insert in it the the URL link of the .mp3 file in your Dropbox and add an appropriate name (as an example, have a look at the post where I posted my rendition of the #3).

Obviously, you must first record somewhere your rendition. I do it in my iPhone through an app, HandyRec, from Zoom which you can download for free (in the Android world it will be similar). Alternatively, you can record your rendition directly with your PC, using Audacity for instance (also free and quite easy to use). If you use an external microphone the result will be way better. In order to avoid complicated interface equipment, the best is to use an USB microphone which you can connect directly to your smartphone or to your PC. The resulting file will be a .wmv raw audio file, which you edit with Audacity (there are simple ways to transfer a file form an iPhone or an Android phone to a PC). Simply said, editing con consist solely in cutting the excess waveform at the beginning and end of the file if you managed to get a clean cut record, but you can also cut/splice/join bits and pieces of your file so as to produce a complete, "clean", audio file which you then can save as an .mp3 or a .wma file to use in your post. Audacity does all this.

This is all you need to get started, I think, but feel free to ask me anything, I'll be happy to clarify if I can :D.

Edited to correct spelling mistakes and clarify some phrases... :)
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1972 - Kuniharu Nobe #8, 658/52, Spr, IN RW, Tokyo, JP
1976 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.50, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
1979 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.40, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
2014 - Hermanos Camps Master Nº 3, 650/52, CA Ced, MG RW, Banyoles, ES

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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by Jorge Oliveira » Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:36 pm

This is my second version of Sor's Opus 35, #3. I played it with a metronome stuck in my left ear :lol:, with each quarter note divided into four 16th notes, so, this time, I'm reasonably confident that the dotted notes have their correct values. I've also tackled the gruppetto notes (turn in English) in m.19 as a series of slurs (instead of a series of plucked notes as in my #3 (V1) :oops: - thank you, Alexander). It is not yet perfect but, with a daily practice, I'll succeed in playing it in a consistent and controlled way, I'm sure. I kept the tempo at 1/4 = 60 bpm, as, as already pointed out, even in the upper limit of the Larghetto, 1/4 = 54 bpm, it was too slow for me to be able to keep a steady rhythm. Comments are welcome.

The record was produced with the Zoom Handy Recorder app on my iPhone, the sound capture being made by an iRig microphone that connects to the iPhone via a Lightning to 3.5 mm Headphone Jack Adapter. The guitar used was my Ryoji Matsuka No.50 (1976), fitted with Knobloch Actives Carbon CX, High Tension strings. The resulting .wav file was then processed with the Audacity audio editor on Windows 10 to produce the .wma and .mp3 files below. Apart from cutting and splicing the audio wave file to eliminate some not so well succeeded sections, no special effects were added during the recording and editing sessions.

Sor, Fernando - Opus 35 #3 (V2).wma
Sor, Fernando - Opus 35 #3 (V2).mp3


The Table of Posted Records (TPR) becomes the following:

Sor's Opus 35 recorded pieces as of 12Feb19.png

The corresponding Excel file (TPR) is stored in my Google Drive and any Forum Member can download and use it at any time. By pointing to any particular post, the reader will have available not only the sound or video file but also all the subsequent comments made by other Forum members.
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1972 - Kuniharu Nobe #8, 658/52, Spr, IN RW, Tokyo, JP
1976 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.50, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
1979 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.40, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
2014 - Hermanos Camps Master Nº 3, 650/52, CA Ced, MG RW, Banyoles, ES

mainterm
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by mainterm » Thu Feb 14, 2019 7:09 pm

Hi Jorge - just a few minor comments.

I really like to hear how much your playing has improved over the course of these Sor projects!
Jorge Oliveira wrote:
Thu Feb 07, 2019 5:59 pm
[...]

... I find it quite difficult the LH fingering in the transition of C Major in m.9 to G Major in m.10. As for the transition of A# Major to in m.11 to F Major in m.12, it is not that difficult. During the whole of m.11, in A# Major, I prepare in advance the F Major of m.12 by establishing a barré on the 1st fret covering the six strings and with my fingers 4, 3 and 2 pressing the first three stings in the 3rd fret.


Sor's Opus 35 #3 m.11.png
Regarding transition from C (m.10) to G (m.11): If one plays the low C with 3 and the higher one with 1, it is quite possible during this to position fingers 2 and 4 to hover over the low and high Gs respectively. Do this whilst playing the last beat of m.10 and the transition may be made a little easier.

Regarding "A# major": while aurally there is no difference between A# major and Bb major, in conventional notation and common parlance (and certainly if you talk to composers, and very much so if you talk to theorists), there is a difference! You may invite future theory nit-pickers to correct you on an insignificant matter (as I am clearly doing now :)).

Also your left hand fingering seems overly difficult (and a little confusing). If you observe your graphic depiction of A# major in m.11 - why are you placing (or holding?) finger 4 on the first string? One alternative here is to simply play Sor's fingering which is quite easy.
Jorge Oliveira wrote:
Thu Feb 07, 2019 5:59 pm
When the time comes to move into m.12, I just pluck the 3rd string (the last 16th note of m.11) and slide my finger 2 immediately to fret 2, lifting at the same time finger 4 and 3, and play the first chord of m.12, an F Major, as indicated in the picture following


Sor's Opus 35 #3 m.12, b.1.png
And, when one has followed Sor's fingering, simply picking up 3 and 4 from Bb and D on strings 3 and 2 respectively, is much easier than sliding 2 down from Bb to A. In the former case, 2 may be already placed on A making the transition the simple act of lifting 3 and 4.

Perhaps I've misconstrued your intended fingerings however, if so, then ignore!

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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by mainterm » Thu Feb 14, 2019 7:46 pm

Jorge Oliveira wrote:
Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:36 pm
[...]
I kept the tempo at 1/4 = 60 bpm, as, as already pointed out, even in the upper limit of the Larghetto, 1/4 = 54 bpm, it was too slow for me to be able to keep a steady rhythm. Comments are welcome.
Nice work Jorge!

Keep in mind that as a teaching piece, one of Sor's aims Op.35 no.3 may have been to develop the ability to maintain rhythmic pulse at a slow tempo. Perhaps as well to work on a singing melody and shaping phrases.

And something for anyone to ponder: the physical act of languid and flowingly moving one's arms and fingers, perhaps even swaying the body or head about, may feel like an expression of a legato, but the sonic effect of flowing legato requires adjacent melody notes to be very connected to each other without other sounds between them.

A very good legato tends to require very precise movements (lifting, string crossing, shifting, slurring etc) and timing.

One movement I'll highlight in this op.35 no.3 context is shifting - take m.2 as an example of this. It is quite possible to move the B-D diad down to the A-C diad shifting with fingers 2 and 1, and to make this sound as a nearly perfect legato.

How? By moving very, very fast from B-D to A-C.

Fast doesn't mean, jerky, or out of control, just fast. One way to visualize this is to shift the fingers at the precise moment they are needed for the next beat. In practice of course it is a fraction of a second beforehand, but the visualization helps.

I think I saw elsewhere in this thread the notion of just using 4 - 3 on the first diad and lifting them to the already placed 2 - 1, or something of this nature. Of course this is possible - each fingering presents different challenges and offers different rewards once mastered...

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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by Jorge Oliveira » Fri Feb 15, 2019 3:39 pm

mainterm wrote:
Thu Feb 14, 2019 7:09 pm
Hi Jorge - just a few minor comments.

I really like to hear how much your playing has improved over the course of these Sor projects!
Oh, thank you, mainterm, yours are nice and encouraging words, I deeply appreciate them :D.
Jorge Oliveira wrote:
Thu Feb 07, 2019 5:59 pm
[...]

... I find it quite difficult the LH fingering in the transition of C Major in m.9 to G Major in m.10. As for the transition of A# Major to in m.11 to F Major in m.12, it is not that difficult. During the whole of m.11, in A# Major, I prepare in advance the F Major of m.12 by establishing a barré on the 1st fret covering the six strings and with my fingers 4, 3 and 2 pressing the first three stings in the 3rd fret.


Sor's Opus 35 #3 m.11.png
mainterm wrote: Regarding transition from C (m.10) to G (m.11): If one plays the low C with 3 and the higher one with 1, it is quite possible during this to position fingers 2 and 4 to hover over the low and high Gs respectively. Do this whilst playing the last beat of m.10 and the transition may be made a little easier.
Yes, that's a very good idea. But then, I'll go even further. Instead of just hovering finger 2 over the low G, I'll press it down on low G already during the whole of m.10, and therefore, I'll move into the correct fingering of m.11 by just pressing down into high G the already hovering finger 4 as you suggested. The transition becomes, then, quite easy, indeed, thank you.
mainterm wrote: Regarding "A# major": while aurally there is no difference between A# major and Bb major, in conventional notation and common parlance (and certainly if you talk to composers, and very much so if you talk to theorists), there is a difference! You may invite future theory nit-pickers to correct you on an insignificant matter (as I am clearly doing now :)).
Well, I'm always learning... :)
mainterm wrote: Also your left hand fingering seems overly difficult (and a little confusing). If you observe your graphic depiction of A# major in m.11 - why are you placing (or holding?) finger 4 on the first string? One alternative here is to simply play Sor's fingering which is quite easy.
Well, indeed, there is no specific reason to keep on pressing finger 4, it serves no purpose.
Jorge Oliveira wrote:
Thu Feb 07, 2019 5:59 pm
When the time comes to move into m.12, I just pluck the 3rd string (the last 16th note of m.11) and slide my finger 2 immediately to fret 2, lifting at the same time finger 4 and 3, and play the first chord of m.12, an F Major, as indicated in the picture following


Sor's Opus 35 #3 m.12, b.1.png
mainterm wrote: And, when one has followed Sor's fingering, simply picking up 3 and 4 from Bb and D on strings 3 and 2 respectively, is much easier than sliding 2 down from Bb to A. In the former case, 2 may be already placed on A making the transition the simple act of lifting 3 and 4.

Perhaps I've misconstrued your intended fingerings however, if so, then ignore!
No, not at all, thanks for having called my attention to it, I'll see how Sor devised the fingering for these measures and I'll adopt it eventually. My intention is to keep on playing this and post a V3 in the near future, I'm not that happy with the current V2 :).
1972 - Kuniharu Nobe #8, 658/52, Spr, IN RW, Tokyo, JP
1976 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.50, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
1979 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.40, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
2014 - Hermanos Camps Master Nº 3, 650/52, CA Ced, MG RW, Banyoles, ES

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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by Jorge Oliveira » Fri Feb 15, 2019 4:39 pm

mainterm wrote:
Thu Feb 14, 2019 7:46 pm
Jorge Oliveira wrote:
Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:36 pm
[...]
I kept the tempo at 1/4 = 60 bpm, as, as already pointed out, even in the upper limit of the Larghetto, 1/4 = 54 bpm, it was too slow for me to be able to keep a steady rhythm. Comments are welcome.
Nice work Jorge!

Keep in mind that as a teaching piece, one of Sor's aims Op.35 no.3 may have been to develop the ability to maintain rhythmic pulse at a slow tempo. Perhaps as well to work on a singing melody and shaping phrases.

And something for anyone to ponder: the physical act of languid and flowingly moving one's arms and fingers, perhaps even swaying the body or head about, may feel like an expression of a legato, but the sonic effect of flowing legato requires adjacent melody notes to be very connected to each other without other sounds between them.

A very good legato tends to require very precise movements (lifting, string crossing, shifting, slurring etc) and timing.

One movement I'll highlight in this op.35 no.3 context is shifting - take m.2 as an example of this. It is quite possible to move the B-D diad down to the A-C diad shifting with fingers 2 and 1, and to make this sound as a nearly perfect legato.

How? By moving very, very fast from B-D to A-C.

Fast doesn't mean, jerky, or out of control, just fast. One way to visualize this is to shift the fingers at the precise moment they are needed for the next beat. In practice of course it is a fraction of a second beforehand, but the visualization helps.

I think I saw elsewhere in this thread the notion of just using 4 - 3 on the first diad and lifting them to the already placed 2 - 1, or something of this nature. Of course this is possible - each fingering presents different challenges and offers different rewards once mastered...
Thank you again, mainterm :D, you are very kind. As I said in my previous post, it is my intention to do, soon, a V3 of this #3. I'll try, then, to lower the tempo a little bit to, say, 1/4 = 55 bpm. But I'll do the record with a metronome stuck in my left ear, just to make sure I don't speed up in the middle of the piece... :lol:, keeping in mind your recommendations above.
1972 - Kuniharu Nobe #8, 658/52, Spr, IN RW, Tokyo, JP
1976 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.50, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
1979 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.40, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
2014 - Hermanos Camps Master Nº 3, 650/52, CA Ced, MG RW, Banyoles, ES

troyatlarge
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by troyatlarge » Tue Feb 19, 2019 1:24 am

Hello,

I just stated with Op. 60 no 1 today, so am a bit late for your group. However, I was wondering if, for future reference, you have grading.png's for Op. 44, 31, 6 and 9 like what you shared with Op. 60 & 35. Its great to see such an ordering. Thanks

Troy

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Jorge Oliveira
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by Jorge Oliveira » Tue Feb 19, 2019 7:08 pm

troyatlarge wrote:
Tue Feb 19, 2019 1:24 am
Hello,

I just stated with Op. 60 no 1 today, so am a bit late for your group. However, I was wondering if, for future reference, you have grading.png's for Op. 44, 31, 6 and 9 like what you shared with Op. 60 & 35. Its great to see such an ordering. Thanks

Troy
Hi Troy:

Welcome into these Sor's Projects, it will be wonderful to see you posting your renditions of the Opus 60 in the respective thread, you will surely receive positive and encouraging comments.

Conceerning your question about grading tables of Sor's studies, well, having finished Opus 60 and trying to decide which would be next, I looked into the Suggested Grading by Michael Macmeeken in page 193 of my Chanterelle Edition of Fernando Sor "The Complete Studies for Guitar" by Ophee/de Kloe.

Levels in Sor's studies.png

From this table I could count how many pieces of each level each Opus has,

Grading of Sor's Studies.png

and I then extract the tables of Opus 60 and Opus 35 you know already:

Opus 60 grading.png

Opus 35 grading.png

I stopped here but with the information above you can easily construct grading tables for the remaining Opuses.

Best regards,

Jorge
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1972 - Kuniharu Nobe #8, 658/52, Spr, IN RW, Tokyo, JP
1976 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.50, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
1979 - Ryoji Matsuoka No.40, 650/53, Ced, IN RW, JP
2014 - Hermanos Camps Master Nº 3, 650/52, CA Ced, MG RW, Banyoles, ES

troyatlarge
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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by troyatlarge » Mon Feb 25, 2019 5:34 pm

Thank you so very much Mr. Jorge. I am certainly not so advanced as y'all and need to take it quite slow and learn it well. I am only up to prelude 7 in Shearer's fist book and also practicing Op. 60 no 1 just because his music is so very interesting and musical. I asked the above so that I might focus on just the elementary pieces for now across the Op numbers before moving to anything more advanced. So thank you once again for the help as to what to look at in that way.

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Re: Fernando Sor, Opus 35 - shall we learn it together?

Post by Yisrael van Handel » Thu Feb 28, 2019 2:24 pm

Jorge Oliveira wrote:
Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:36 pm
This is my second version of Sor's Opus 35, #3.
Jorge,
Much, much better. Greatly improved. I have a few comments, which I will make when I post my recording. I am working on it now.
Yisrael van Handel
Modi'in Ilit, Israel

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