Best guitar method for self learning

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dtoh
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Re: Best guitar method for self learning

Post by dtoh » Mon Mar 25, 2019 11:37 pm

pimapima wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 6:18 pm
I actually disagree with this. There was an interesting discussion on /r/classicalguitar recently about how you get past a plateau or get out of a rut. At some point most people will reach a point where they are not enjoying their practice (most of the time temporary). This is where discipline plays a key role in self learning. If you have good discipline you are more likely to make it past that phase. For me I have to keep it in my head that even though I may not be enjoying a particular piece of practicing, I am going to get better for it and will be able to play even more beautiful pieces in the future.

Obviously discipline isn't something you can just have... it is more of a mindset/personality trait. Either way, find what motivates you, prepare for the rough times, and make it out even better/stronger than before.
Different strokes for different folks I guess. I have never not enjoyed practicing, and I think a big part of the reason is because I never felt like I was under pressure to work on something specific for an upcoming lesson or had a fixed practice routine. I always just practiced what I wanted, which might be working just on left hand exercises for a few days (or weeks), then sight reading for a while, or maybe working on a specific piece for a while. For the first three years, I practiced two or three hours a days and there was never a single time when I didn't want to pick up the guitar. In my book, enjoyment trumps discipline. If you're doing it just to reach some sort of imaginary goal and don't enjoy the practice, why waste thousands of hours to play something beautifully when you can produce the same thing by tapping Spotify on your iphone.
Last edited by dtoh on Tue Mar 26, 2019 12:44 am, edited 1 time in total.

dtoh
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Re: Best guitar method for self learning

Post by dtoh » Mon Mar 25, 2019 11:57 pm

Rick Beauregard wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 7:40 pm
I respectfully disagree with this statement. First, I think you have it backwards. A good teacher is critical in the first two years to make sure your foundations of technique are correct and you learn the proper way to critique and teach yourself. Second, get advice on finding a good teacher and the second point is not an issue.
Again, I think it depends on the person. For me, I didn't have much choice since my travel schedule (11 months a year on the road) didn't really allow me to have any kind of a lesson schedule. I believe if you pay close attention to the instruction available on the web and are disciplined in self critique you can achieve good results. In my case, when I did get a teacher (pretty competent IMHO), the technical corrections were very minor.

I'm sure there are a lot of people who will do a lot better with a teacher, but it's not the only way to go and many people can succeed without one.

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: Best guitar method for self learning

Post by Rick Beauregard » Tue Mar 26, 2019 4:54 pm

Yes, OK, everyone is different. And the OP was asking about resources for self teaching. But for others, rank beginners seeking advice from this thread about teacher/no teacher, I think if we go by the rule and not the exceptions, generally it’s good to get early instruction from a good teacher. I’m not teaching. And I sometimes roll my eyes when Delcamper (many of whom are teachers) always say “get a teacher”. But saying “you don’t need a teacher” is different advice that doesn’t apply to everyone.

As far as enjoyment versus discipline, I agree you gotta love what you do. But at some point any serious student will reach plateaus and valleys. It takes discipline to overcome these. I love what Pepe Romero said about rock music, and I think it applies. “Rock music is like cupcakes. And I love cupcakes. But you can’t live on cupcakes.” That is, you can’t survive only on what you love.
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dtoh
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Re: Best guitar method for self learning

Post by dtoh » Wed Mar 27, 2019 3:28 pm

Rick Beauregard wrote:
Tue Mar 26, 2019 4:54 pm
I think if we go by the rule and not the exceptions, generally it’s good to get early instruction from a good teacher. I’m not teaching. And I sometimes roll my eyes when Delcamper (many of whom are teachers) always say “get a teacher”. But saying “you don’t need a teacher” is different advice that doesn’t apply to everyone.


Good point. But I don't think I suggested that no one needs a teacher. That said, I do question whether "get a teacher" is in fact "the rule." Maybe in general or for young students, but as for the denizens of this forum many of whom are here because they are learning on their own and all I think who are seeking ways to improve beyond what a teacher can provide, the "get a teacher" refrain is perhaps not always that helpful. Maybe traditional pedagogy is the required route for those training for virtuosity, but I'm not sure it works that well for everyone. I can not count how many people I know who had 10+ years of formal training on an instrument in their youth and then never touch the instrument after they are 20. Something seems to not be working right.
As far as enjoyment versus discipline, I agree you gotta love what you do. But at some point any serious student will reach plateaus and valleys. It takes discipline to overcome these. I love what Pepe Romero said about rock music, and I think it applies. “Rock music is like cupcakes. And I love cupcakes. But you can’t live on cupcakes.” That is, you can’t survive only on what you love.
I'm not sure there are any technical or musical plateaus just motivational ones.... and motivation is a complex thing which is different for every person. Maybe Pepe Romero can't survive on cupcakes, but to Ritchie Blackmore (who BTW loves classical music), rock was something to which he devoted 15 hours a day practicing.

I don't really know the answer to these questions, but I think we should at least consider the possibility that the journey is more important than the destination.

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Mollbarre
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Re: Best guitar method for self learning

Post by Mollbarre » Wed Mar 27, 2019 3:35 pm

... but to Ritchie Blackmore (who BTW loves classical music), rock was something to which he devoted 15 hours a day practicing.
Hmm...I think that's physically impossible... :mrgreen:
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antonio
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Re: Best guitar method for self learning

Post by antonio » Thu Mar 28, 2019 10:01 pm

I have Parkening's "Guitar Method" vol 1&2 and and find it very informative and well done, by one of the best Classical Guitarists of our generation (also very affordable).

antonio
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Re: Best guitar method for self learning

Post by antonio » Sun Mar 31, 2019 3:27 am

Didn't mean to go off topic; I misinterpreted the Post. I like dtoh's statement : "... enjoyment trumps discipline..."

Sankie
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Re: Best guitar method for self learning

Post by Sankie » Fri Apr 19, 2019 12:33 pm

Yisrael van Handel wrote:
Sun Mar 24, 2019 7:17 am
GabrielSilva wrote:
Sun Mar 24, 2019 3:39 am
Hi! Which is the best method for self learning the classical guitar technique? And which daily workload and study routine would you recommend for having a good evolution through self teaching? (sorry for the bad English)
Gabriel,
This is a very difficult question to answer. What is your level now? What are your goals? My own experience is that you need three different types of information to get started: technique, basic music theory, and interpretation. The bad news is that there is not much written on interpretation, especially not for beginners. The good news is that any well-trained musician, and especially a conductor, can help you with interpretation. As for technqiue and basic music theory, it depends on what you already know.
  1. For absolute beginners, I have not yet found anything better or more effective than Aaron Shearer's Classical Guitar Technique, volume 1 and 2. Get the original 1937 edition, which is now in the public domain, and you should be able to find for free on the internet. These two books will give you a basic background in how to read music and how to play the guitar. Shearer's technique is outdated, and when you finish book 2, you should switch to modern technique.
  2. When you finish Aaron Shearer's two books, you need beginner's repertoire to play, and knowledge about modern technique.
  3. Books about modern technique (if you are serious, you will need all of them; this will cost you about $200 altogether):
    • Stanley Yates, Classical Guitar Technique from Foundations to Virtuosity, Volume 1 and 2
    • Hubert Käppel, The Bible of Classical Guitar Technique. If you read German, get it in German, because the English translation is poor.
    • Scott Tenannt, Pumping Nylon
    • Marco Tamayo, Essential Principles for the interpretation of the classical guitar. Very expensive for a tiny little book, English translation is poor. If you can read Spanish, get it in Spanish. Important information about technique for the intermediate guitarist aspiring to advance.
  4. Beginner's repertoire:
  5. Finally, if you read Spanish, Mario Amayo's Metodología de estudio para la ejección e interpretación de la guitarra clásica, which you can find on the internet, contains important basics about interpretation that you will not find elsewhere.
Of course, the best thing is to have a great teacher. I am in the United States every year for two weeks, and during my stay there I arrange guitar workshops for myself with a top teacher. For the rest of the year I am on my own, and these books are my guides (plus feedback from this forum).
I hope some of this helps.

Wow thank you Sir. Been looking for this information for a long time. Thank you
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Joshia de Jonge 2018
Ramirez 4ne 2016
Andrea Tacchi Coclea Tuchea 2015
Ramirez 1a 2018
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Yisrael van Handel
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Re: Best guitar method for self learning

Post by Yisrael van Handel » Fri Apr 19, 2019 1:12 pm

Sankie wrote:
Fri Apr 19, 2019 12:33 pm
Wow thank you Sir. Been looking for this information for a long time. Thank you
Hi, Sankie, and welcome to the forum. This forum is about helping each other. I have also learned a lot from the forum. I hope this information will help you and increase your enjoyment.
Yisrael van Handel
Modi'in Ilit, Israel

Robbie Flamerock
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Re: Best guitar method for self learning

Post by Robbie Flamerock » Fri Apr 19, 2019 1:42 pm

Yisrael van Handel wrote:
Sun Mar 24, 2019 7:17 am
GabrielSilva wrote:
Sun Mar 24, 2019 3:39 am
Hi! Which is the best method for self learning the classical guitar technique? And which daily workload and study routine would you recommend for having a good evolution through self teaching? (sorry for the bad English)
Gabriel,
This is a very difficult question to answer. What is your level now? What are your goals? My own experience is that you need three different types of information to get started: technique, basic music theory, and interpretation. The bad news is that there is not much written on interpretation, especially not for beginners. The good news is that any well-trained musician, and especially a conductor, can help you with interpretation. As for technqiue and basic music theory, it depends on what you already know.
  1. For absolute beginners, I have not yet found anything better or more effective than Aaron Shearer's Classical Guitar Technique, volume 1 and 2. Get the original 1937 edition, which is now in the public domain, and you should be able to find for free on the internet. These two books will give you a basic background in how to read music and how to play the guitar. Shearer's technique is outdated, and when you finish book 2, you should switch to modern technique.
  2. When you finish Aaron Shearer's two books, you need beginner's repertoire to play, and knowledge about modern technique.
  3. Books about modern technique (if you are serious, you will need all of them; this will cost you about $200 altogether):
    • Stanley Yates, Classical Guitar Technique from Foundations to Virtuosity, Volume 1 and 2
    • Hubert Käppel, The Bible of Classical Guitar Technique. If you read German, get it in German, because the English translation is poor.
    • Scott Tenannt, Pumping Nylon
    • Marco Tamayo, Essential Principles for the interpretation of the classical guitar. Very expensive for a tiny little book, English translation is poor. If you can read Spanish, get it in Spanish. Important information about technique for the intermediate guitarist aspiring to advance.
  4. Beginner's repertoire:
  5. Finally, if you read Spanish, Mario Amayo's Metodología de estudio para la ejección e interpretación de la guitarra clásica, which you can find on the internet, contains important basics about interpretation that you will not find elsewhere.
Of course, the best thing is to have a great teacher. I am in the United States every year for two weeks, and during my stay there I arrange guitar workshops for myself with a top teacher. For the rest of the year I am on my own, and these books are my guides (plus feedback from this forum).
I hope some of this helps.
Shearer wrote his first book in 1937?

Sankie
Posts: 28
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Re: Best guitar method for self learning

Post by Sankie » Fri Apr 19, 2019 2:24 pm

Yisrael van Handel wrote:
Fri Apr 19, 2019 1:12 pm
Sankie wrote:
Fri Apr 19, 2019 12:33 pm
Wow thank you Sir. Been looking for this information for a long time. Thank you
Hi, Sankie, and welcome to the forum. This forum is about helping each other. I have also learned a lot from the forum. I hope this information will help you and increase your enjoyment.
Thank you Sir, I’m new in classical guitar, just learnt for 6 months. Looking to learn a lot from this forum.
Edmund Blochinger Llobet 2018
Joshia de Jonge 2018
Ramirez 4ne 2016
Andrea Tacchi Coclea Tuchea 2015
Ramirez 1a 2018
Jean Noel Rohe 2014

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Tom Poore
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Re: Best guitar method for self learning

Post by Tom Poore » Fri Apr 26, 2019 12:43 pm

Robbie Flamerock wrote:Shearer wrote his first book in 1937?
His first book was published in 1959.

Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA

Juan del Bosque
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Re: Best guitar method for self learning

Post by Juan del Bosque » Fri Apr 26, 2019 8:19 pm

This may seem a little outlandish, but you might check around your town and see if there are any accomplished musicians--on any instrument--and see if they'll work with you on duets, and teaching the basic meat and potatoes elements of music. You can still refer to your methods for proper technique. I don't know, maybe I'm off base, but in my experience I've learned--and been inspired by--musicians who were masters at whatever, be it drums, piano, or voice.

15070p3
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Re: Best guitar method for self learning

Post by 15070p3 » Wed May 22, 2019 2:48 pm

From the University of Texas at Austin,
http://hdl.handle.net/2152/954
discusses what constitute a good classical guitar method (book) and reviews many extant method books available since the 19th century.

To download the PDF file, follow the link above then click on

View/Open
steadmanks026.pdf (1.567Mb)
"There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so." - - Shakespeare

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Yisrael van Handel
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Re: Best guitar method for self learning

Post by Yisrael van Handel » Wed May 22, 2019 8:13 pm

Tom Poore wrote:
Fri Apr 26, 2019 12:43 pm
Robbie Flamerock wrote:Shearer wrote his first book in 1937?
His first book was published in 1959.

Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA
That is incorrect. I have a 4 volumes of his 1937 Method. And it is for sale in several places on the Internet.
Yisrael van Handel
Modi'in Ilit, Israel

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