Make it Stick

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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tcrist
Posts: 18
Joined: Mon Nov 20, 2017 3:39 pm

Make it Stick

Post by tcrist » Sat Mar 31, 2018 3:56 am

I would encourage you all to explore a new book on the process of learning titled Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning
by Peter C. Brown,‎ Henry L. Roediger III,‎ Mark A. McDaniel.

There is a great deal of information that sums up some recent best practices that support the deep absorption of information.

Really good stuff!

Tim

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Steve Ganz
Luthier
Posts: 1013
Joined: Mon Dec 25, 2006 6:19 pm
Location: Blaine, WA, USA

Re: Make it Stick

Post by Steve Ganz » Mon Apr 09, 2018 10:36 pm

Thanks tcrist,
Has this helped you learn pieces better? Practice better? Perform better?
What is the good stuff?
(I have not read the book, but I did study learning and memory a few years ago.)
Steve

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Larry McDonald
Teacher
Posts: 1316
Joined: Fri Feb 23, 2007 2:33 pm
Location: Milwaukee, Wi USA

Re: Make it Stick

Post by Larry McDonald » Tue Apr 10, 2018 4:36 pm

Thanks for this, tcrist. Ordered.
-Lare
Dr. Lawrence A. McDonald, D.M.A., Art Kaplan Fellow
Author of The Conservatory Tutor for Guitar
2018 Michael Thames "Ancient Dragon" Cd/Ir
2008 Michael Thames Cd/Br
Royal Conservatory Advanced Guitar and Theory Instructor

tcrist
Posts: 18
Joined: Mon Nov 20, 2017 3:39 pm

Re: Make it Stick

Post by tcrist » Mon May 14, 2018 10:03 pm

Steve, lots of great advice about learning. Most notably, it refutes the idea that mass repetitions produce results. The book explains that while mass reps are good for temporary/short-term memory, that spaced out and varied practice actually leads to more permanent results. Interleaving (toggling back and forth among several technical problems) is ultimately a more productive method of learning.

Retrieval of concepts is one of the most important aspects of learning. Retrieval requires some time in between reps in order to forget a little of what you were doing. The "forgetting a little" is important. So you need to develop habits and a process which allows this to occur.

It's full of great advice. I would say it's critical to understand how learning takes place. Many of the intuitive things we do are just the opposite of what we should be doing.

IMHO, this book should be required reading for all musicians.


Steve Ganz wrote:
Mon Apr 09, 2018 10:36 pm
Thanks tcrist,
Has this helped you learn pieces better? Practice better? Perform better?
What is the good stuff?
(I have not read the book, but I did study learning and memory a few years ago.)

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