Mini Classical Guitar

Discussions relating to the classical guitar which don't fit elsewhere.
Wuuthrad
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Re: Mini Classical Guitar

Post by Wuuthrad » Sun Apr 15, 2018 4:17 am

soufiej wrote:
Sun Apr 15, 2018 12:36 am
"If you are brain injured, your mind certainly does change!"



Actually, after reading that post, I believe my mind has been permanently altered. :bye:
Funny I thought that was your original intent! :desole: :lol: :smorfia:
"Talking about music is like dancing about architecture"

"Information is not knowledge, Knowledge is not wisdom
Wisdom is not truth, Truth is not beauty
Beauty is not love, Love is not music
Music is THE BEST..."

MIoutdoorguy
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Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2018 12:08 pm

Re: Mini Classical Guitar

Post by MIoutdoorguy » Sun Apr 15, 2018 12:33 pm

I have a Cordoba mini, and the big adjustment that I need to make when switching to play with it is the shorter scale. I put some strap buttons on it to play with a strap because it was difficult to hold otherwise.

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Michael.N.
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Re: Mini Classical Guitar

Post by Michael.N. » Sun Apr 15, 2018 12:49 pm

I have one that I knocked up out of scrap wood, just over 50 cm string length. Loved building it. I tune it in G and use it as a pseudo lute/vihuela. String tension is lower than modern full size guitar. One day I'll get a recording of it. Fun little instrument.
Historicalguitars.

janepaints
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Re: Mini Classical Guitar

Post by janepaints » Mon Apr 16, 2018 3:08 am

Peter Frary wrote:
Thu Apr 12, 2018 6:41 am
I play classical guitars from 48mm (Cordoba Mini) to 54mm (Ramirez) and, like others have said, it only takes a few seconds to adjust and all is well. It might take you a practice session or two for your brain to remap but after that it just works. What I found the most tricky with the Cordoba Mini wasn't the nut size but, instead, holding such a tiny instrument took the most getting used to. I finally figured out a strap was the only way I could comfortably play such a wee instrument. The side benefit is now I can really rip on a ukulele.

WONDERFUL.... thanks so much for sharing your video....i own and love the all-mahogany all-laminate cordoba coco mini but have been interested in the smaller-still cordoba mini's..your video made me even more interested... it's tuned requinto, i.e. as if capo'd at 5th fret?....thanks again and wow you play good.

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Peter Frary
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Re: Mini Classical Guitar

Post by Peter Frary » Mon Apr 16, 2018 7:10 am

Thanks Jane. Yes, the Mini is exactly the same body size and sharp as a baritone ukulele but tuned up a fourth above guitar pitch similar to a requinto or tenor ukulele. Basically it's a small requinto. In Hawaii most people call it a guitarlele.
I play a Cordoba Mini so I look taller on stage!

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Michael.N.
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Re: Mini Classical Guitar

Post by Michael.N. » Mon Apr 16, 2018 9:02 am

As do Yamaha. They go by many names but the concept of such a small guitar is old. There's at least one small guitar made by Panormo from around 1840. I suspect there were others made. I've heard it called a bambino guitar but I've never seen a 19 th century example in person.
Historicalguitars.

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kertsopoulos
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Re: Mini Classical Guitar

Post by kertsopoulos » Tue Apr 17, 2018 7:59 pm

The topic is very interesting and I enjoyed very much the comments and the interpretations in the videos.There are three main concepts highlighted by the comments:
1) the need for having a mini guitar to accommodate for the storage space that cannot accept a normal size guitar (the initial need of the topic writer)

2) the need for a 52 mm nut width, which in many mini guitars is smaller and although 2 mm smaller width, coming down to 50 mm width, might be so small that some argue that this is of no importance; however, one has to take into account the smaller frets on a 50 cm scale, so the combination of a 2 mm loss in the width of the nut with the smaller frets frets of the shorter scale length by 15 cm (65 cm of the normal guitar's scale length -15 cm = 50 cm scale length of the mini guitar). It is this combination that makes the mini guitar acceptable to be used for easy works but impossible to compete a) the normal scale of the normal size guitar (640cm to 666 cm approx) and b) its normal nut width of 52 mm at least.

3) the need for many guitarists to play on a high tuning (eg. 5 semitones higher) to express better the music of the baroque and renaissance period.

There are solutions to the above, where we can keep our normal size guitar and by applying on it especially made high tuning strings to tune in whatever range we want. Make the open strings to be tuned as though we have a capo on the 3d or 5th or 7th or 9th or 12th or 14th fret. Of course for each different tuning we have to apply a different set of especially constructed set of high tuned strings. This solves many of the problems because we transform our normal guitar to any high tuned guitar without the need to play on a mini guitar. The only concept that is not solved is the one that deals with the storage. Well, we can't have everything, can we? Below is a video of Smaro Gregoriadou playing on a high tuned guitar using these strings where the guitar is tuned 5 semitones higher than normal. For more info. on high tuned strings this delcamp thread:viewtopic.php?f=46&t=114167

AndreiKrylov

Re: Mini Classical Guitar

Post by AndreiKrylov » Tue Apr 17, 2018 8:27 pm

kertsopoulos wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 7:59 pm
The topic is very interesting and I enjoyed very much the comments and the interpretations in the videos.There are three main concepts highlighted by the comments:
1) the need for having a mini guitar to accommodate for the storage space that cannot accept a normal size guitar (the initial need of the topic writer)

2) the need for a 52 mm nut width, which in many mini guitars is smaller and although 2 mm smaller width, coming down to 50 mm width, might be so small that some argue that this is of no importance; however, one has to take into account the smaller frets on a 50 cm scale, so the combination of a 2 mm loss in the width of the nut with the smaller frets frets of the shorter scale length by 15 cm (65 cm of the normal guitar's scale length -15 cm = 50 cm scale length of the mini guitar). It is this combination that makes the mini guitar acceptable to be used for easy works but impossible to compete a) the normal scale of the normal size guitar (640cm to 666 cm approx) and b) its normal nut width of 52 mm at least.

3) the need for many guitarists to play on a high tuning (eg. 5 semitones higher) to express better the music of the baroque and renaissance period.

There are solutions to the above, where we can keep our normal size guitar and by applying on it especially made high tuning strings to tune in whatever range we want. Make the open strings to be tuned as though we have a capo on the 3d or 5th or 7th or 9th or 12th or 14th fret. Of course for each different tuning we have to apply a different set of especially constructed set of high tuned strings. This solves many of the problems because we transform our normal guitar to any high tuned guitar without the need to play on a mini guitar. The only concept that is not solved is the one that deals with the storage. Well, we can't have everything, can we? Below is a video of Smaro Gregoriadou playing on a high tuned guitar using these strings where the guitar is tuned 5 semitones higher than normal. For more info. on high tuned strings this delcamp thread:viewtopic.php?f=46&t=114167
Nice video, very interesting and lovely sound! Where one could get such strings?

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Contreras
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Re: Mini Classical Guitar

Post by Contreras » Tue Apr 17, 2018 10:30 pm

prawnheed wrote:
Wed Apr 11, 2018 5:05 pm
I have classical guitars with nut widths varying from 48 to 52mm. Takes a few seconds to adjust.

+1 - I have various guitars including a little terz which I use for travel. Technique is still working
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend.
Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read.
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kertsopoulos
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Location: Athens, Greece

Re: Mini Classical Guitar

Post by kertsopoulos » Wed Apr 18, 2018 10:10 am

AndreiKrylov wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 8:27 pm
kertsopoulos wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 7:59 pm
The topic is very interesting and I enjoyed very much the comments and the interpretations in the videos.There are three main concepts highlighted by the comments:

3) the need for many guitarists to play on a high tuning (eg. 5 semitones higher) to express better the music of the baroque and renaissance period.

There are solutions to the above, where we can keep our normal size guitar and by applying on it especially made high tuning strings to tune in whatever range we want. Make the open strings to be tuned as though we have a capo on the 3d or 5th or 7th or 9th or 12th or 14th fret. Of course for each different tuning we have to apply a different set of especially constructed set of high tuned strings. This solves many of the problems because we transform our normal guitar to any high tuned guitar without the need to play on a mini guitar. The only concept that is not solved is the one that deals with the storage. Well, we can't have everything, can we? Below is a video of Smaro Gregoriadou playing on a high tuned guitar using these strings where the guitar is tuned 5 semitones higher than normal. For more info. on high tuned strings this delcamp thread:
viewtopic.php?f=46&t=114167
Nice video, very interesting and lovely sound! Where one could get such strings?
Thank you Andrei for your kind comment and interest in my work.

The strings are invented and constructed by myself within my research and constructional platform:
"Kertsopoulos Aesthetics" and they were first presented worldwide in 1994.
One can obtain them communicating directly with me at my email writing one's special needs.
They are not produced in mass production.

As is understandable, I cannot quote prices of each set in our hospitable forum's post, found in this link:
viewtopic.php?f=46&t=114167
apart from informing the readers of the materials used, the tuning possibilities of each different set
and what has been achieved and is available today to the guitarist.

If someone is interested for more info. I will be happy to personally inform her/him
of more details concerning each set, the prices if needed and cover as best as I can the special needs of the
guitarist. My email is: gkertsopoulos@yahoo.gr

Best regards,
Yorgos

AndreiKrylov

Re: Mini Classical Guitar

Post by AndreiKrylov » Thu Apr 19, 2018 12:25 am

kertsopoulos wrote:
Wed Apr 18, 2018 10:10 am

If someone is interested for more info. I will be happy to personally inform her/him
of more details concerning each set, the prices if needed and cover as best as I can the special needs of the
guitarist. My email is: gkertsopoulos@yahoo.gr

Best regards,
Yorgos
Thanks Yorgos!
Some of luthiers I knew in Petersburg, Russia made their own strings in 1970s -80s...
including some strings good for different tunings.
I tried some, sound was interesting, but they usually hold tuning lot worse than "standard" strings.
Best regard!
Andrei

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kertsopoulos
Posts: 374
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Location: Athens, Greece

Re: Mini Classical Guitar

Post by kertsopoulos » Thu Apr 19, 2018 8:45 am

AndreiKrylov wrote:
Thu Apr 19, 2018 12:25 am
kertsopoulos wrote:
Wed Apr 18, 2018 10:10 am

If someone is interested for more info. I will be happy to personally inform her/him
of more details concerning each set, the prices if needed and cover as best as I can the special needs of the
guitarist. My email is: gkertsopoulos@yahoo.gr

Best regards,
Yorgos
Thanks Yorgos!
Some of luthiers I knew in Petersburg, Russia made their own strings in 1970s -80s...
including some strings good for different tunings.
I tried some, sound was interesting, but they usually hold tuning lot worse than "standard" strings.
Best regard!
Andrei
Thanks Andrei for your kind answer.
Many attempts have been made in the past (and are still made) by luthiers and string constructors to
produce high tuned strings. One of the main problems they face is exactly the one you point out.

They do not stay in tune and moreover, they do not have the proper sonority, attack on the note
and desirable sustain.

This is what makes my "Kertsopoulos Aesthetics" platform of "High tuned strings" to have a worldwide
copyright of an absolutely successful presentation from 1994.

My strings in all tunings up to the 14th fret (Open string tuning), keep absolute steady tuning and
provide excellent sonority, attack and sustain. After all, one can have evidence of this by listening to all the
interpretations provided on the video above. If they did not provide this, then it would have been
impossible to have this sonority in the video presented. Below is the Asturias interpreted by me
on my strings where the open strings are tuned to: 6th string = f# 8va, at the 14th fret. The open strings
are tuned as though one has put a capo at the 14th fret. You can be a judge of what is accomplished
at a very difficult high range, never before or even now, accomplished by any string constructor.

Thanks again for your interest, my best regards,
Yorgos

And below is the Sonata K.11, L.352 of Domenico Scarlatti where I interpret it on the 9th fret (open strings=the 9th fret tuning if a capo is applied).

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