Maintaining repertoire volume

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Charles Cook
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Maintaining repertoire volume

Post by Charles Cook » Mon Jul 09, 2018 9:26 pm

There is so much beautiful guitar music available out there. Everyday, I find additional music that I would like to learn. What is a reasonable number of pieces to maintain for a well-performed and memorized repertiore for an intermediate guitarist? Or an advanced guitarist?
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rinneby
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Re: Maintaining repertoire volume

Post by rinneby » Mon Jul 09, 2018 9:31 pm

Hard to say. Around 1,5-2 hours or so seems reasonable?

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Kevin L Benbow
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Re: Maintaining repertoire volume

Post by Kevin L Benbow » Mon Jul 09, 2018 9:34 pm

I have about 2 hours and it is hard. I am solidifying one hour. Once done I will do the same with hour two. My plan is to keep the scores at hand so that older pieces can be " re learned" quickly.
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Jim Davidson
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Re: Maintaining repertoire volume

Post by Jim Davidson » Mon Jul 09, 2018 11:59 pm

Depends on how well you want to play, doesn't it?
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Contreras
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Re: Maintaining repertoire volume

Post by Contreras » Tue Jul 10, 2018 3:53 am

Jim Davidson wrote:
Mon Jul 09, 2018 11:59 pm
Depends on how well you want to play, doesn't it?
Hahaha ... true. Even with my current pieces I need to play through once to remind myself, then it's better on the second run through.
I have around an hour, with a bunch of others I can polish quite quickly ... but I'm not a performer.
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Richwilly
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Re: Maintaining repertoire volume

Post by Richwilly » Tue Jul 10, 2018 6:49 am

It depends on a few factors. The obvious one being how much you play/practice each day. Then there is the question of how difficult your repertoire is for you, this will dictate how much time you need to keep it in order.
There is also the new repertoire you wish to learn, how difficult is it? Are there techniques you need to learn/refine to enable you to play it?

Lastly I would say it is important not to get bogged down in what you can already do in order to keep progressing. I would advise keeping your musicality as fresh and alive as possible by continuing to learn new pieces.

Sorry to have questions rather than answer for you but by considering them you should find the answer for yourself.
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powderedtoastman
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Re: Maintaining repertoire volume

Post by powderedtoastman » Tue Jul 10, 2018 7:49 pm

I think it all depends on you, each of us has a different brain with a different capacity.
I can manage quite a lot of short and sight readable study pieces without committing to memory, but if I neglect any one of them for a while, any "gotchas" that I had before will come back easily.

I had a long (but not super difficult) piece that I memorized over the course of winter quarter, which I mostly dropped after about March or so, and now if I try to play it I can do most of it but the harder parts are not there. I really do have to keep practicing it regularly if I want to keep that piece going while I learn my next big one!

But yeah, I doubt that any more than an hour or two is that reasonable. I can do two hours but only maybe half of that is material that I would do without the music in front of me.

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Jedaks
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Re: Maintaining repertoire volume

Post by Jedaks » Thu Jul 12, 2018 1:59 am

I devote part of my practice regime to maintaining old pieces.

I try to practice 1.5 hours a day, 45 min in the morning and 45 in the late afternoon. I like to devote the afternoons to just playing older pieces. But life is full of choices. Pieces that don't challenge me much and that I can play at anytime from memory I maybe play just once a week. Pieces that I seem to always need to concentrate on I usually play every afternoon.

However, there are pieces that I have let "fade away" because they either no longer interest me and would need the sheet music to re-learn them.
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Charles Cook
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Re: Maintaining repertoire volume

Post by Charles Cook » Thu Jul 12, 2018 4:08 pm

Thanks to everyone for the great advice. I really hadn't thought about the depth of factors that help answer this question. The one that seems to resonate the most with me is the difficulty vs. my current capability. I will rethink my desired repertoire.
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gtrfinger
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Re: Maintaining repertoire volume

Post by gtrfinger » Fri Jul 13, 2018 1:55 pm

Richwilly wrote:
Tue Jul 10, 2018 6:49 am
It depends on a few factors. The obvious one being how much you play/practice each day. Then there is the question of how difficult your repertoire is for you, this will dictate how much time you need to keep it in order.
There is also the new repertoire you wish to learn, how difficult is it? Are there techniques you need to learn/refine to enable you to play it?

Lastly I would say it is important not to get bogged down in what you can already do in order to keep progressing. I would advise keeping your musicality as fresh and alive as possible by continuing to learn new pieces.

Sorry to have questions rather than answer for you but by considering them you should find the answer for yourself.
Can't fault this advice. I was stuck on a plateau for years, going over and over my repertoire without learning anything new.

Finding new material to learn, refreshes all parts of your playing, at all stages.
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Pirooz Emad
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Re: Maintaining repertoire volume

Post by Pirooz Emad » Sat Jul 14, 2018 5:22 am

I would also add that the work of repertoire maintenance also depends on how you have learned the pieces in the first place.

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Re: Maintaining repertoire volume

Post by Pirooz Emad » Sat Jul 14, 2018 5:25 am

Contreras wrote:
Tue Jul 10, 2018 3:53 am
Jim Davidson wrote:
Mon Jul 09, 2018 11:59 pm
Depends on how well you want to play, doesn't it?
Hahaha ... true. Even with my current pieces I need to play through once to remind myself, then it's better on the second run through.
I have around an hour, with a bunch of others I can polish quite quickly ... but I'm not a performer.
I love that Groucho joke, thanks for making me laugh!

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TomPage
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Re: Maintaining repertoire volume

Post by TomPage » Sat Jul 14, 2018 1:58 pm

How much repertoire you can maintain is a function of how much time you have to practice. A rule of thumb is that you can maintain as much repertoire as you have hours of practice per day. I.e., if you practice an hour a day, you can maintain an hour of repertoire (while learning one new piece at a time). Obviously you can't practice every piece every day (but you don't need to for maintenance) and you must be very organized (use a practice schedule) so that you don't miss pieces for weeks and so that you don't spend too long per day on any one piece. Pieces you know well can be practiced only once every three - five days. Pieces you are still polishing should be practiced every other day. Difficult passages should be practiced outside the piece so that you spend your time on those passages and don't waste it on passages you have nailed.
Tom

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Charles Mokotoff
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Re: Maintaining repertoire volume

Post by Charles Mokotoff » Sat Jul 14, 2018 2:41 pm

I keep an hour memorized as my programs are typically that length.
If I had to play another hour I could just change some tunings, put on a capo on various frets and do the same hour, calling it all originals ;)
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prosopopeia
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Re: Maintaining repertoire volume

Post by prosopopeia » Fri Jul 20, 2018 8:07 pm

This has been really tough for me as well--as you learn newer pieces, you tend to drop (without realizing it) older pieces. Sadly, some of the pieces I've forgotten are among my favorites. I find that drop-D pieces are especially likely to fall away, since re-tuning is an extra step, and hence makes them a little less likely to be brought out. Very long pieces are also tough (Legnani 19, Soros Theme and Variations), because learning them tends to be the only thing you do for extended amounts of time. I find that at any given time, I have about an hour of material that I can play without many mistakes or needing sheet music, and I haven't really been able to make that budge. To perform in a coffee house or restaurant, or even just to play in public, you actually don't need more.

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