Post one technique that changed your playing

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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Dirck Nagy
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Re: Post one technique that changed your playing

Post by Dirck Nagy » Sun Aug 05, 2018 5:57 pm

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Nikos_Greek
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Re: Post one technique that changed your playing

Post by Nikos_Greek » Sun Aug 05, 2018 7:53 pm

Cannot single out one technique only. Short nails, slow study, Giuliani 120 daily, focusing on tone and playing legato when playing scales. Above all possibly the way I shaped my nails, not filing vertically but at an angle thus allowing the string slip off the string rather than getting tangled in it.

Kevin L Benbow
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Re: Post one technique that changed your playing

Post by Kevin L Benbow » Mon Aug 06, 2018 12:49 am

dta721 wrote:
Sun Aug 05, 2018 1:44 pm
Kevin L Benbow wrote:
Sun Aug 05, 2018 2:15 am
Thinking of the right hand as though it is pushing, or rather poking the strings, instead of plucking them. The idea is to very, very briefly plan to them in that sweet spot between the nail and the flesh and then pushed down allowing the string to bounce out. This completely revolutionized my ability to produce tone.
+1
I can relate to this tone producing technique, which I recently saw in Dave Kear's tremolo video -which may not be the original intent for this tone production. Look at the timing between 1:00 to 1:16 when he talked about "planting":


Nail shaping in conjunction with this would complete the process!
That is it precisely. That is also a beautiful tremolo.
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guit-box
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Re: Post one technique that changed your playing

Post by guit-box » Mon Aug 06, 2018 1:16 am

Kevin L Benbow wrote:
Mon Aug 06, 2018 12:49 am
dta721 wrote:
Sun Aug 05, 2018 1:44 pm
Kevin L Benbow wrote:
Sun Aug 05, 2018 2:15 am
Thinking of the right hand as though it is pushing, or rather poking the strings, instead of plucking them. The idea is to very, very briefly plan to them in that sweet spot between the nail and the flesh and then pushed down allowing the string to bounce out. This completely revolutionized my ability to produce tone.
+1
I can relate to this tone producing technique, which I recently saw in Dave Kear's tremolo video -which may not be the original intent for this tone production. Look at the timing between 1:00 to 1:16 when he talked about "planting":


Nail shaping in conjunction with this would complete the process!
That is it precisely. That is also a beautiful tremolo.
It's interesting some post short nails as the thing that helped them the most, but I've always had bad nails that wore down short and they didn't work great for me that short. Now that I've reinforced them and grown them out longer 2-3 mm past flesh instead of the usual recommended even with the flesh or 1mm at the most, my playing has improved. Looking at Dave's excellent tremolo and nail length (which appears long-ish) I'd have to say this is a personal thing. Of course we all know that nail length is dependent on type of finger tip, but Dave's nail seem to extend past the finger tip at least 2-4 mm. Maybe he can comment about that and give us a look at his nails from the palm side of the hand.
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Kevin L Benbow
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Re: Post one technique that changed your playing

Post by Kevin L Benbow » Mon Aug 06, 2018 3:45 am

guit-box wrote:
Mon Aug 06, 2018 1:16 am
Kevin L Benbow wrote:
Mon Aug 06, 2018 12:49 am
dta721 wrote:
Sun Aug 05, 2018 1:44 pm


+1
I can relate to this tone producing technique, which I recently saw in Dave Kear's tremolo video -which may not be the original intent for this tone production. Look at the timing between 1:00 to 1:16 when he talked about "planting":


Nail shaping in conjunction with this would complete the process!
That is it precisely. That is also a beautiful tremolo.
It's interesting some post short nails as the thing that helped them the most, but I've always had bad nails that wore down short and they didn't work great for me that short. Now that I've reinforced them and grown them out longer 2-3 mm past flesh instead of the usual recommended even with the flesh or 1mm at the most, my playing has improved. Looking at Dave's excellent tremolo and nail length (which appears long-ish) I'd have to say this is a personal thing. Of course we all know that nail length is dependent on type of finger tip, but Dave's nail seem to extend past the finger tip at least 2-4 mm. Maybe he can comment about that and give us a look at his nails from the palm side of the hand.
My own nails are about 2mm above the finger. Sometimes longer. I know some who use longer still. This is more a matter of personal preference. My daughter plays on bare finger tips. :(
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Hunt-man
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Re: Post one technique that changed your playing

Post by Hunt-man » Mon Aug 06, 2018 5:41 pm

Good responses. A few I would have never guessed. :)

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eno
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Re: Post one technique that changed your playing

Post by eno » Mon Aug 06, 2018 7:47 pm

Kevin L Benbow wrote:
Sun Aug 05, 2018 2:15 am
Thinking of the right hand as though it is pushing, or rather poking the strings, instead of plucking them. The idea is to very, very briefly plan to them in that sweet spot between the nail and the flesh and then pushed down allowing the string to bounce out. This completely revolutionized my ability to produce tone.
+1, I was just going to write the same. Plus keeping the right hand at a lower angle with respect to the stings (previously I played closer to "Segovia" right-angle position). I learned these both techniques when I used to play lute and then brought them to CG which greatly improved the sound.
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Kevin L Benbow
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Re: Post one technique that changed your playing

Post by Kevin L Benbow » Tue Aug 07, 2018 1:26 am

eno wrote:
Mon Aug 06, 2018 7:47 pm
Kevin L Benbow wrote:
Sun Aug 05, 2018 2:15 am
Thinking of the right hand as though it is pushing, or rather poking the strings, instead of plucking them. The idea is to very, very briefly plan to them in that sweet spot between the nail and the flesh and then pushed down allowing the string to bounce out. This completely revolutionized my ability to produce tone.
+1, I was just going to write the same. Plus keeping the right hand at a lower angle with respect to the stings (previously I played closer to "Segovia" right-angle position). I learned these both techniques when I used to play lute and then brought them to CG which greatly improved the sound.
I have never understood the logic behind the "Segovia" Hand at an awkward downward angle technique. To me it looks like that over time it would raise the risk of injury to the right hand. I prefer to use a natural hand angle with a slight upward curve in my right wrist. The overall curve may change depending upon what I am doing.

About a year ago I went to a guitar society meeting where One person playing kept their forearm parallel to the ground and then sharply angled their hand downward over the strings. It caused me pain in my right wrist just to watch it.
Purnell #93
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eno
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Re: Post one technique that changed your playing

Post by eno » Tue Aug 07, 2018 7:01 pm

Kevin L Benbow wrote:
Tue Aug 07, 2018 1:26 am
I have never understood the logic behind the "Segovia" Hand at an awkward downward angle technique. To me it looks like that over time it would raise the risk of injury to the right hand. I prefer to use a natural hand angle with a slight upward curve in my right wrist. The overall curve may change depending upon what I am doing.

About a year ago I went to a guitar society meeting where One person playing kept their forearm parallel to the ground and then sharply angled their hand downward over the strings. It caused me pain in my right wrist just to watch it.
There've been a lot of discussions here and elsewhere on the pros and cons of "Segovia" vs "natural" right hand position. There are reasons why Segovia, Parkening and many others even these days used the "Segovia" position, it does have some benefits but also has some disadvantages. It's just a matter of personal choice. My choice is the "natural" position primarily for the reason of my tonal preferences, I much prefer deeper, more delicate and more mellow sound produced by the "tilted" position compared to brighter but punchy and sharper-sounding tone produced by "Segovia" position.
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Karen
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Re: Post one technique that changed your playing

Post by Karen » Thu Aug 09, 2018 2:08 pm

The use of anchoring for the right hand. I had kind of forgotten about this as I have been concentrating on bettering my left hand, but my teacher just assigned me a new piece (Allegro, Op.50, no.13, Mauro Giuliani). As I started learning it I rediscovered the various anchor techniques (or sometimes not) he taught me in the beginning are invaluable to playing this piece with security and better tone. Sometimes the way to improvement is looking backwards :) And probably why he gave me the piece in the first place.

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Re: Post one technique that changed your playing

Post by doug » Thu Aug 09, 2018 2:45 pm

Playing with a metronome. It forces me to keep the rhythm consistant. I have to work hard at it.
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Hunt-man
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Re: Post one technique that changed your playing

Post by Hunt-man » Thu Aug 09, 2018 3:34 pm

doug wrote:
Thu Aug 09, 2018 2:45 pm
Playing with a metronome. It forces me to keep the rhythm consistant. I have to work hard at it.
Thats a good one too but for me, only sometimes...

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Steve Ganz
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Re: Post one technique that changed your playing

Post by Steve Ganz » Thu Aug 09, 2018 6:56 pm

Accentuating dynamics is important for me. Only play loudly when required. It is ok to play really softly in addition to loudly. It helps the music expression.
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AgedAngel
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Re: Post one technique that changed your playing

Post by AgedAngel » Sat Aug 11, 2018 1:33 am

Using my "a" finger to start musical phrases. This has often allowed right hand fingering to fall nicely into place without strange string crossings.

I should mention that I have developed bone spurs in my right hand ring finger (a) that have locked the joint just behind the nail into a permanent 30 degree angle. The angle is fortuitous, because it doesn't impede plucking. This might have something to do with my "discovery".

I'm also fortunate that the bone spurs didn't occur in my *left* hand. That would be a disaster!

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PeteJ
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Re: Post one technique that changed your playing

Post by PeteJ » Sat Aug 11, 2018 12:28 pm

Practicing 'planting' has helped me a lot. At first I thought it was just a valuable technical exercise but I've come to realise that it's an important expressive tool allowing variations in articulation. Top of the list though, as it was for someone earlier in the thread, would be mediation.

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