New from Southern California

ama760
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Aug 11, 2018 5:07 am

New from Southern California

Post by ama760 » Sun Aug 12, 2018 12:41 am

My name is Art. I started playing piano at six years old. I took lessons weekly until I was well into high school. I enjoyed it, but I had other priorities. In college I took a few classical guitar courses, and that is when I began my love affair with the classical guitar and it's music. I also took private lessons. After several years, I was playing at advanced levels and I was good. Then, I went to medical school. My private teacher at the time invested a lot of time and effort, pushing me to get better. I spent hours daily practicing. I loved it. When I told my maestro that I had decided to go to medical school, unlike my family who were thrilled, he was not so. I told him that I could do both. He was not happy, The first lesson I had after my first week of medical school, i went to my lesson totally unprepared. I had never done that before. He was a fairly well known Cuban born guitarist and composer; I will keep his name out of this. Well, he started yelling me at first in English, then it escalated into Spanish. When, I left that lesson, I put my 1977 Ramirez away, and I never touched it again because I knew that to play with the perfection demanded, I simply would not have time, So, I sacrificed something that I loved so passionately so that I could pursue what would be my life time profession. And the road required all of my time. I graduated in the top 5% of my medical school class, then went on to do a Surgery Residency (I've always been good with my hands), When I completed my residency, I felt that I had a little bit of time, so I got a piano. I don't care if I make mistakes on the piano. I never took it as seriously as I took the study of the classical guitar. Years, decades have passed. I still practice Medicine, I have not retired. I truly love my job. I could never see myself not doing what I do. It is who I am. However, I find myself not having to work the long hours that I used to, I've situated myself in such a way that I can still work, yet I have for time for other things. So a few months ago, I realized that I have the time now to play the guitar again. The more I thought about it, the more excited I became. I researced and I found someone I thought would be a good teacher for me, and I found a great teacher. He is a younger, dynamic and modern classical guitarist. Let me say this. Picking up the guitar after decades of not playing it is NOT like getting back on a bike. Any of you know that in order to really play the guitar well it takes daily practice. If you take a couple days off, you will not be able to play the piece you have bee practicing. So, if missing a couple days of practice has that much effect on the ability to play, imagine what it was like for me. Picking up the guitar for my first lesson was so awkward. I didn't know my way around the first position. So, I began from the beginning. I caught on quickly. My instructor assigned me some level one pieces. I did them, but I realized that was something I could not tolerate. So I started picking out a repertoire that was much more advanced and I was determined to learn it, coming through the back door. My teacher was a little apprehensive about this approach, but he has seen weekly that I can do it, so now he is picking pieces for me that I suspect maybe a little too difficult, but he says, "you can do this". I am now three or four months into it. It is hard for me to explain what this experience is like for me. it is like bumping into a dear friend who i thought had died, and seeing that person alive. When I put my guitar away all those years ago, there was grieving involved. I never thought i would play it again. This is like a dream for me. This is what I know. Anything of value in life, has value by virtue of the sacrifices that we make on its behalf. I sacrificed something I loved passionately for my career, which has immense value to me. But, now, the reward is amazing. So, I am here to squeeze as much knowledge as I can out of every resource I can get my hands on, I want to know the music. I want to know how the guitar is made and I want to know about the luthiers who make them. I want to know history and the cultures that goes along with the playing of this instrument. I want to study the classical guitar, every aspect, but mostly, I want to be able to play the music beautiful, because, for me, it is the music that my love affair with the guitar is all about. It has always been the music that drove me. Someone told me to go to Delchamps and I will find everything I am looking for there. I did not know that I would have introduce myself and he an active participant. In general, like being invisible, however, it seems that I have a lot of opinions (ask my wife) and I often have lots of questions.

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oski79
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Location: Sebastopol, California

Re: New from Southern California

Post by oski79 » Sun Aug 12, 2018 1:31 am

Welcome to Delcamp!

If you haven't already, please take a moment to read this page for a good rundown on how the forum works, rules, history, etc. You have found a great source of classical guitar knowledge, as we have a wide assortment of members, from beginners to performing artists, with a number of fine teachers, historians, and luthiers. So feel free to ask any questions you might have, but consider using the search function first, as many topics have already been discussed at length.

If you participate in other online forums, you might notice that things can occasionally get rather heated. We work hard to keep that from happening on Delcamp. Please read Mssr. Delcamp’s thoughts on the subject.

Please note that there is a requirement to post an average of once a month. Members not meeting this standard may have their memberships terminated.

Adding your location to your profile is a nice touch. Many of us have made new friends from doing just that.

Again, welcome to the forum!

Regards,

oski79
“People may say I can’t sing, but no one can ever say I didn’t sing.” --Florence Foster Jenkins

jazzbyproxy
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Aug 11, 2018 3:27 am

Re: New from Southern California

Post by jazzbyproxy » Sun Aug 12, 2018 5:25 am

Hello,

This was a very compelling story. I just put my intro post up last night. I am also in So Cal and am currently a medical student. I studied classical guitar in college and haven't played it for 6 years. Its amazing to think of all the time away you spent and how finite our lives are. I am glad you are finding time to pursue CG again. Wish me luck in trying to maintain guitar and medical education at the same time!

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lagartija
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Re: New from Southern California

Post by lagartija » Sun Aug 12, 2018 1:11 pm

Welcome to Delcamp, Art! We are glad you found us and decided to join. We look forward to your contributions to our conversations.
:bye:
When the sun shines, bask.
__/^^^^^o>
Classical Guitar forever!

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Rick Beauregard
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Joined: Thu Nov 06, 2014 5:23 am
Location: Blaine, WA

Re: New from Southern California

Post by Rick Beauregard » Sun Aug 12, 2018 3:26 pm

Welcome ama760. Your story expresses something familiar to many of us on this site, certainly for me and much better than I could have. I particularly love your analogy of finding a friend you thought had died. I know that friend.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

ama760
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Aug 11, 2018 5:07 am

Re: New from Southern California

Post by ama760 » Tue Aug 14, 2018 2:18 am

When I wrote my introduction, I thought that no one would read it, so, I was very pleasantly surprised to receive this reply from you. Please let me congratulate you on your pursuit of a medical education and your career in Medicine. . It is a great privilege to be presented with this body of knowledge that only physicians have access to it in it's entirety.

When you take on a new piece of music, it requires hours of practice. First you have to look at the whole piece, and break it down into it's musical components. You look at the key, then you have become intimate with the rhythm and you have to pick out the melody from the accompaniment. Then you have to examine all the ink, the fortes, the crescendos, the staccatos...all of that stuff. You have to practice the right hand, then the left hand, then you put it together and you practice it for hours. It takes a lot of repetition. You wouldn't dream of playing that piece for your next lesson unless you could play it perfectly, right?

Learning Medicine is no different.

"Perseverance of the righteous brings good fortune."----The I Ching

If there is anything that you need in the way of moral support or inspiration, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Thanks for responding to my introduction.

ART

ama760
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Aug 11, 2018 5:07 am

Re: New from Southern California

Post by ama760 » Tue Aug 14, 2018 2:36 am

Thank you so much, Rick. I'm pleased to know that what i wrote stuck a chord, so to speak. And, I am very happy to know that there are others who are experiencing bliss.

ART

“A Chinaman of the T'ang Dynasty—and, by which definition, a philosopher—dreamed he was a butterfly, and from that moment he was never quite sure that he was not a butterfly dreaming it was a Chinese philosopher. Envy him; in his two-fold security.”

Rosencranz and Guildenstern are Dead
Thomas Stoppard

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