Why is 3rd string G unstable?

Choice of classical guitar strings and technical issues connected with their use.
Chuah Hui Hsien
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Re: Why is 3rd string G unstable?

Post by Chuah Hui Hsien » Sun Jan 13, 2019 11:08 pm

Although the carbon 3rd can be a better substitution as it holds tune well,but it sounds bit brighter than B and E,not many fundamental guitarists can adjust to it.They would rather endure the tubbiness.Peter suggested a hybrid set to me,Dogal Diamente.I am still waiting for the strings to arrive to test on my 64cm guitar.

The nylon G is the thickest and it tuned lower than B and E,it feels slack from saddle to nut.It barely holds its pitch right from the begining.It gets worst when the guitar reacts to humidity swing and fingers static friction,not only G, the less noticeable ones also start to rebel,I am having hard time intonating the strings! The Yamaha came with intonated saddles on their guitars,quite good in terms of tuning G.

What I'd do is I'll give G a couple of more wraps on the barrel at the machine head,stretch and tune it much higher and leave it in the case overnite.It holds up a bit better but not a solution either.
2017 Karel Dedain Spruce/Maple (Torres) 64cm
1998 Yamaha GD 10, Spruce/IRW 65cm
1988 Alhambra AL 8, Cedar/IRW 65cm

Leo
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Location: Bay Area, California

Re: Why is 3rd string G unstable?

Post by Leo » Mon Jan 14, 2019 6:35 am

I don't like the tubbiness of most g strings on nylon sets, or the fact that they seem to go sharp faster than the b or e string, so I use a carbon g on the sets that I like.

Another alternative is Aquila's Rubino or Alchemia string sets that are very bright and in my opinion, do not have tubby g strings. They are not carbon or regular nylon sets, the Rubino's have a metal powder in the nylon core, and the Alchemia are a plastic made from sugar cane.
2012 Hippner, Spruce-birdseye maple
1985 Takamine C-132S
2002 Casa Montalvo, Spruce, Ziricote

malc laney
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Re: Why is 3rd string G unstable?

Post by malc laney » Mon Jan 14, 2019 9:11 am

This post must be so confusing for Seasick Steve!

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joachim33
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Re: Why is 3rd string G unstable?

Post by joachim33 » Mon Jan 14, 2019 11:23 am

guitarrista wrote:
Sun Jan 13, 2019 8:47 pm
joachim33 wrote:
Sun Jan 13, 2019 10:48 am
petermc61 wrote:
Sun Jan 13, 2019 8:56 am
Nylon strings tend to go sharp with playing but there is no real reason as far as I can see why your G should be less stable than the nylon b and e.
Trebles go sharp after starting to play and the G is the worst. I understand some of the cause is the actual bending of the string.
No, it is not from bending. Nylon strings get sharp when warmed up because they expand, just like anything other material. Except that with nylon extruded into a string, the string expands in the radial direction (wanting to get thicker) due to its molecular arrangement - causing its effective tension to be higher, hence going sharp.
I am not disagreeing with what you have written, it is my understanding that the flexing of the string under vibration is one of the contributing factors to it warming up (internal friction).

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guitarrista
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Re: Why is 3rd string G unstable?

Post by guitarrista » Mon Jan 14, 2019 4:32 pm

joachim33 wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 11:23 am
guitarrista wrote:
Sun Jan 13, 2019 8:47 pm
joachim33 wrote:
Sun Jan 13, 2019 10:48 am

Trebles go sharp after starting to play and the G is the worst. I understand some of the cause is the actual bending of the string.
No, it is not from bending. Nylon strings get sharp when warmed up because they expand, just like anything other material. Except that with nylon extruded into a string, the string expands in the radial direction (wanting to get thicker) due to its molecular arrangement - causing its effective tension to be higher, hence going sharp.
I am not disagreeing with what you have written, it is my understanding that the flexing of the string under vibration is one of the contributing factors to it warming up (internal friction).
OK, I wasn't sure. As part of your explanation (not quoted above, but same paragraph), you said "which makes the nylon contract" (it actually makes it expand) so I was confused as to what you thought contributes to what, and provided the correct explanation just in case.
Konstantin
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1982 Anselmo Solar Gonzalez

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